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Hi,
When you observe your dog's heart beat rhythm, is it kind of irregular? My dog (2 year old collie mix) sounds like he has a strange heart rhythm. I've observed it for some time, but never commented on it with the vet. He's perfectly healthy, so I'm not concerned. And all the times he's been looked at by vets (annual physicals and stuff), no vet has commented on it, so I assumed that's just how dogs are?

But if that's just the way they are, why? Is it common in the animal world? Are humans weird for having such a regular rhythm?

I'm only making the observations while the dog is still of course.
 

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Apparently they are as regular as human rhythms. One of my dogs was diagnosed with a heart murmur which lead to a cardiologist and documenting several valves of her heart not closing properly. Apparently she is good to go until she isn't any more. Its pretty sad.
 

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I've noticed my dog having a weird heart beat as well. His will go like:

boom boom....boom boom....boom boom boom....boom boom....boom boom

My vet said that there's nothing wrong with him either. He's healthy enough and runs like a horse! Very strong and never seems to fade or get frail. *shrugs*
 

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Yes, it is common. Don't worry about it :)
Hi,
When you observe your dog's heart beat rhythm, is it kind of irregular? My dog (2 year old collie mix) sounds like he has a strange heart rhythm. I've observed it for some time, but never commented on it with the vet. He's perfectly healthy, so I'm not concerned. And all the times he's been looked at by vets (annual physicals and stuff), no vet has commented on it, so I assumed that's just how dogs are?

But if that's just the way they are, why? Is it common in the animal world? Are humans weird for having such a regular rhythm?

I'm only making the observations while the dog is still of course.
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That's called a sinus arrhythmia, and it is normal in dogs (but abnormal in people). When the dog breathes in, the heart tends to beat a bit faster and when the dog breathes out, it tends to slow down. It tends to be most noticeable at rest and disappears as the overall heart rate goes up.
 

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Dogs can develop heart problems/murmurs - they don't have to be born with them. My dog was diagnosed at 7 years old and he lived till he was 13 1/2. It is always progressive unfortunately. Our doc said it eventually turns into congestive heart failure, as with humans, the heart just cannot keep up with demand for oxygen enriched blood. My Simon developed an enlarged heart from severe arrhythmia in both chambers. He developed a 'choking' response from his big heart pressing on his trachea, and physical activity would trigger it. We carried him up the stairs so he would not be stressed, but he was not heavy, it was never a problem. There are meds that can help. Good luck.
 

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That's called a sinus arrhythmia, and it is normal in dogs (but abnormal in people). When the dog breathes in, the heart tends to beat a bit faster and when the dog breathes out, it tends to slow down. It tends to be most noticeable at rest and disappears as the overall heart rate goes up.
I know this is an old post, but I hadn't seen it before and I'm glad it got brought up. I've noticed this with George and it's good to know it's normal.. very interesting!
 

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That's called a sinus arrhythmia, and it is normal in dogs (but abnormal in people). When the dog breathes in, the heart tends to beat a bit faster and when the dog breathes out, it tends to slow down. It tends to be most noticeable at rest and disappears as the overall heart rate goes up.
Took the words out of my mouth! It's normal and I've observed it on both of mine :)
 
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