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Discussion Starter #1
I've had her for about 2 months and I've basically let her pull me when we walk. I've briefly tried many times leash training her by stopping and turning around whenever she'd start pulling but I gave up in the past after 5 to 10 minutes of failure. I would really like to leash train her, but it's more for my own selfishness just because it can get annoying when she pulls on me. I kind of feel like it would be unfair to her to come up with new rules after 2 months of allowing her to pull and she'll get frustrated and I should have either done the training from the beginning or should not at all. What are your thoughts?
 

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Quite the opposite! I think people who do NOT leash train their dogs are more cruel. Having a dog drag you down the street is not pleasant for you. I suspect walks are either less frequent or shortened up because of that. I also think that it is not pleasant for the dog. This is obvious by the gagging and snorting as they try to breath with the collar tight across their airway. Teaching a dog to walk politely on leash can happen at any age. It takes some patience and time but it is well worth the effort. This does not mean that they can't go and sniff things on occasion. Teach them a release word so their are times they can go sniff and times they need to stay closer to you. Proper leash manners also might help to keep your dog safe on walks from traffic as well as other loose dogs. The out of control dog that drags it's owner down the street is more of a "target or threat" to neighborhood dogs. Not saying that loose dogs don't come after a well trained dog but it does seem they are more intent on the dog that is pulling/lunging more frequently. In my experience anyway. Good luck in your training, it will be well worth it. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Quite the opposite! I think people who do NOT leash train their dogs are more cruel. Having a dog drag you down the street is not pleasant for you. I suspect walks are either less frequent or shortened up because of that. I also think that it is not pleasant for the dog. This is obvious by the gagging and snorting as they try to breath with the collar tight across their airway. Teaching a dog to walk politely on leash can happen at any age. It takes some patience and time but it is well worth the effort. This does not mean that they can't go and sniff things on occasion. Teach them a release word so their are times they can go sniff and times they need to stay closer to you. Proper leash manners also might help to keep your dog safe on walks from traffic as well as other loose dogs. The out of control dog that drags it's owner down the street is more of a "target or threat" to neighborhood dogs. Not saying that loose dogs don't come after a well trained dog but it does seem they are more intent on the dog that is pulling/lunging more frequently. In my experience anyway. Good luck in your training, it will be well worth it. :)
Fair enough. I usually do cut the walks short because they aren't a lot of fun for me. She does also sometimes pull so hard that she starts choking (not always but occasionally).
One problem when leash training her is that when I would try to reward her for not pulling by saying something like "good girl" she'd get excited (I think because she loves hearing me praise her) and start running and pulling. So I'm not really sure how to praise her now.
 

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I saw Underdog to Wonderdog last night on AP. The dog that they had on the show was a PBT that was hit by a train and had his right front leg amputated. That dog would pull the trainer down the street on 3 legs.

What they did to get the dog to walk on a loose leash is they setup 2 cones. One twenty feet from the other. The trainer then walked the dog but if the dog pulled she would stop. When the dog stopped pulling and the leash was loose she would continue. If the dog pulled again she would repeat the process from where they were in the 20 foot section. When they finally made it down to the other cone she rewarded and praised at that time.

Funny thing is that this particular dog is not to far from me that was on the show. I do not know these people personally and do not even know if they are on DF but I am hoping to see that dog at the dog park that is near them one day. That would be cool to meet them and the dog.

You might want to try something similar. Don't think that because you don't have 2 cones that you can't try this way as you could always use something for the 20 foot spot such as garbage cans :cool:. Just make sure that if you use garbage cans that they do not have anything the dog would want in them. Otherwise they might just drag you the whole twenty feet :eek: :D
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks; I like the cone idea and I'll try using some similar kind of landmark.
 

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I know your woes of the pulling dog... I've been working on leash training since day 1, which was about 2 weeks ago. I first had just a normal collar, but I was constantly correcting and getting nowhere, I tried the stopping and waiting approach, he simply sat and waited, then resumed pulling the moment I started. I switched to a choker, with a nylon fabric weaved through it to help make it feel 'softer'. (I dunno if it made any difference)

This worked better then a normal collar, but I was still correcting much more then I should, it didn't always release. It made walks tiring and trying as well. I thought it was the way it needed to be for a while, until he broke the choker... snapped the ring that the choker feeds through. Either it was flawed or he's tougher then he looks, cause the choker was for a large-breed.

I took the broken choker back and got a refund (as it was only a week after I bought it) and picked up a collar identical to the one in the picture below. Apparently it's called a 'Gentle leader head leash.' Now, I'm not sure if there are any cons to this type of collar, besides your dog hating it for a few days. It's good to put it on him, give a treat, take it off and repeat for a couple days before trying to walk with it. Anyways... the difference on the first walk was night and day... corrections are almost gone, it's made the walks much more enjoyable for the both of us.

 

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It's never cruel to positively train a dog of any age! It gives them confidence, structure in their lives, and makes them more enjoyable to be around.

There's an excellent sticky post on the dog training forum posted by Curbside Prophet on how to train your dog to walk with a loose leash. Follow it - it will work, I promise you.

One thing you will need to start is a lot of patience. Our dog pulled like a freight train when she was younger but we used the methods described in the sticky note combined with an Easy Walk Harness and she was walking calmly by our side consistently (e.g. 99% of the time) within 3-4 weeks. Sorry, but 5-10 minutes is not going to cut it. The key was teaching her that pulling gets her absolutely nowhere. Period. There is no giving in on that because the act of pulling is reinforcing for the dog.

RE collars: This is just my opinion, but I would never use a choke collar on a dog that's pulling -- you're just begging for damage to the dog's throat with that. And I don't like halti head collars, either. I have seen them work. I knew a 90 lb woman who claimed she could only control her 150 lb rottie by using one. But I personally think that, long term, they are a crutch and a poor substitute for putting in the time to bring about real lasting change in the dog's behavior. And I've seen too many people jerking on their dogs' heads with the things to believe they're all that gentle. For extreme cases and in the right hands, they can be a good tool. But improperly used or when used without first trying a good loose leash training program, they can be punitive.

Stepping down off the soap box now.....ouch! Was a bit high that time....
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I saw Underdog to Wonderdog last night on AP. The dog that they had on the show was a PBT that was hit by a train and had his right front leg amputated. That dog would pull the trainer down the street on 3 legs.

What they did to get the dog to walk on a loose leash is they setup 2 cones. One twenty feet from the other. The trainer then walked the dog but if the dog pulled she would stop. When the dog stopped pulling and the leash was loose she would continue. If the dog pulled again she would repeat the process from where they were in the 20 foot section. When they finally made it down to the other cone she rewarded and praised at that time.

Funny thing is that this particular dog is not to far from me that was on the show. I do not know these people personally and do not even know if they are on DF but I am hoping to see that dog at the dog park that is near them one day. That would be cool to meet them and the dog.

You might want to try something similar. Don't think that because you don't have 2 cones that you can't try this way as you could always use something for the 20 foot spot such as garbage cans :cool:. Just make sure that if you use garbage cans that they do not have anything the dog would want in them. Otherwise they might just drag you the whole twenty feet :eek: :D
I did this for about 15 min yesterday and she made A LOT of progress. As she got better, I moved the cones farther and farther apart. I think 15 min a day of this will help her. Thanks so much! She's such a sweet girl who's always eager to do whatever I want her to. The trick is never motivating her to please me. It's just finding ways to teach her what I want her to do.
 
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