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On a facebook group someone posted that they just got a pitbull. The dog is great with people, very friendly, pesters the cats but 'that's what dogs do' but they weren't sure how to see if the pitty was good with other dogs.

The advice given by a bunch of people? Let's all go to the dog park with our dogs to see if this dog is good with other dogs:doh: really? UGH!!!!

I responded that it might be a better idea to go for a leashed walk and see how the dog reacts to other dogs, or attend classes, same idea, vs. tossing the dog into a dog park full of new dogs off leash to see what goes on.

So, what's the worst dog advice you've heard?
 

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lol

Worst I ever heard was "if you don't socialize a dog properly as a puppy it will be aggressive"

the excuse for any kind of temperament issues seems to be lack of socializing when most (if not all of the time) its just bad genetics....
 

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Squirt lemon juice in the puppy's mouth to teach him not to bite.

Also, hit him on the nose to teach him not to bite.
 

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You need to hit a dog when it misbehaves. It's the only way it'll learn.

My dad has this philosophy. To his credit, all of his dogs have been well behaved. When he hits them, they really won't do that behavior again. What he doesn't care about (or actually, what I highly suspect he LIKES) is how they flinch if he raises his hand or stands up too fast. Ears go down, tails go between their legs, body hunkers down. Yeah, that's the kind of relationship I want with my dog.
 

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lol

Worst I ever heard was "if you don't socialize a dog properly as a puppy it will be aggressive"
the excuse for any kind of temperament issues seems to be lack of socializing when most (if not all of the time) its just bad genetics....
Sorry ... couldn't let this one go ...

Many (most?) middle-of-the-road, easy-going puppies are less in need of "extra" socialization. However:

Individuals prone to undo timidity, without proper, ongoing socialization, could easily grow to become "fear-biters". I won't argue if fear-biting is, or is not, aggression; but the act is certainly aggressive. Perhaps it can be argued that the initial timidity is a direct result of "bad genetics"; but even so, this can often be overcome through appropriate socializing.

There are also a number of breeds bred for, and purposefully possessed of a natural, (genetic) intense defence drive. Simply put, without proper socialization, puppies, which had never learned what is and what is not a real threat, will grow to be overly protective dogs. This "hyper-protectiveness" can, perhaps justifiably, be interpreted as aggression; this is not "bad genetics", but poor socialization.

In our neck of the woods, temperament issues are, most often, the direct result of poor socialization and inadequate training - in other words, not "bad genetics", but bad owners.

 

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Almost anything starting with the words: alpha, dominant, pack leader & the lIke :/
agreed...
lol

Worst I ever heard was "if you don't socialize a dog properly as a puppy it will be aggressive"

the excuse for any kind of temperament issues seems to be lack of socializing when most (if not all of the time) its just bad genetics....
really? wow.... im sorry you believe that....


hmmm worst advice.... oh my one dane is the "im staaarving" all the time dogs and will eat anything in sight. someone told me i need to feed her more (mind you right then she was even a little chunky... 5lbs over probably) she said "you need to feed her as much as she wants because shes obviously very hungry! youre starving her!" me reply? "yes, ill feed her a ton and let her get obese and have health issues... oh! and she can get bloat and die! but hey, she wont be hungry anymore!"
 

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I got told by the shelter I got Star from that I HAD to get one of their huge pinch collars (she was showing me one that would have easily fit a lab, for my then 25 lb 5 month old puppy) because other collars "break" and "teach them to pull," and that that was what she had been taught to walk on for the few months since she got there. (I wonder why Star has such a huge phobia of being led by her collar now that I can only use harnesses without a panic attack....)

Also of course family telling me to deal with her nipping by taking off my shoe and hitting her with it when she was a puppy.
 

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lol

Worst I ever heard was "if you don't socialize a dog properly as a puppy it will be aggressive"

the excuse for any kind of temperament issues seems to be lack of socializing when most (if not all of the time) its just bad genetics....
That sounds like some of the worst advice I've heard. . ."training means nothing, it's all genetics! If he's badly behaved it can't be helped, kill him and start over". Yeah, lots of people believe that and it makes for a lot of dead dogs. Dogs who could have been trained properly if their owners didn't believe it was all in the genes.
 

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Sorry ... couldn't let this one go ...

Many (most?) middle-of-the-road, easy-going puppies are less in need of "extra" socialization. However:

Individuals prone to undo timidity, without proper, ongoing socialization, could easily grow to become "fear-biters". I won't argue if fear-biting is, or is not, aggression; but the act is certainly aggressive. Perhaps it can be argued that the initial timidity is a direct result of "bad genetics"; but even so, this can often be overcome through appropriate socializing.

There are also a number of breeds bred for, and purposefully possessed of a natural, (genetic) intense defence drive. Simply put, without proper socialization, puppies, which had never learned what is and what is not a real threat, will grow to be overly protective dogs. This "hyper-protectiveness" can, perhaps justifiably, be interpreted as aggression; this is not "bad genetics", but poor socialization.

In our neck of the woods, temperament issues are, most often, the direct result of poor socialization and inadequate training - in other words, not "bad genetics", but bad owners.

I have seen lots of dogs that lived in kennels their entire life only to be pulled out once and a while and are perfectly "socialized" and act appropriately for the breed.

I see what some label and socializing more as desensitizing or exposing a dog to certain things so that the dogs knows how to react or can learn the proper way to react. A dog can only move within its genetic temperament slide and you can't make an anxious fearful dog into a good guard dog... socializing is great for dogs who already have temperament flaws such as fear biters but it's not required across the board and its certainly not required for dogs who already have solid genetic temperaments.

Socializing is not taking your dog to the dog park, its not doggy play dates, its not doggy day care or exposing your dog to as many people as possible and forcing your dog to accept them.

I just think a lot of bad genetic temperament traits get the label of "lack of socializing" when really its in the dogs gene's and no matter what you do that particular dog will be dog aggressive, a fear biter, nervous around strangers ect ect.

I 100% agree with the training part of it though, all of these issues IMO can be fixed with good and solid OB which is what should be the main focus instead of letting your dog play with others....

Bottom line is a good dog is not easily ruined.
 

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That sounds like some of the worst advice I've heard. . ."training means nothing, it's all genetics! If he's badly behaved it can't be helped, kill him and start over". Yeah, lots of people believe that and it makes for a lot of dead dogs. Dogs who could have been trained properly if their owners didn't believe it was all in the genes.
Temperament is proven to be genetic and I can't believe that some still think that the environment can play a bigger role here then genetics.

I didn't say that training means nothing, socializing is not training. Not believing that temperament is mainly genetic gets a lot of children and people bit by dogs. Until the public starts demanding better temperaments from breeders instead of blaming the owners for improper socialization the cycle will continue... we should demand solid temperaments and temperament testing on breeding stock just as we demand health testing, because its just as if not more important IMO.
 

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Temperament may be driven by genetics but I believe that behavior is driven primarily by training and environment.
 

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Temperament may be driven by genetics but I believe that behavior is driven primarily by training and environment.
I agree with this. . .let's use the example of a human, who may be genetically outgoing. But if he's kept locked away with no human contact, you can't bring him out of confinement and send him to a party and expect that he'll know how to behave around other humans, no matter how naturally outgoing he may be. Same with a dog--if he's never been around other dogs, he won't know how to behave around other dogs, no matter how great his parents were. There are studies showing that brain chemistry changes based on early experiences. It's not all genetic.
 

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I have seen lots of dogs that lived in kennels their entire life only to be pulled out once and a while and are perfectly "socialized" and act appropriately for the breed.
Agree have seen many. Does not mean it's the best of lives but with some dogs not a problem.
 
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