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Discussion Starter #1
How do wolves in the wild keep from getting mats? I was wondering that the other day, and then a couple of my kids asked me about that.

I've seen a lot of before pictures of collies posted on rescue websites, and many of them are horribly matted and have to be shaved to the skin. Plus mats are painful.

I have never seen a wolf IRL, but I've seen plenty of photographs of them and they don't look like matted wrecks -- far from it.
 

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They don't have Collie-ish fur. Their fur is more like a Husky's. And while Huskies can get kind of thatchy fur, they don't really mat up.
 

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Breeds with harsher, oilier coats tend not to mat, whereas breeds with soft fine coats mat quite easily. I've noticed that the only place that Basil gets mats is behind his ears, and that's where his fur is the most fine and soft.
 

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I have two high content wolfdogs and like wolves, they do not matt and they only lose they're coats only once a year (thank goodness)
Here's two pics that I took back in May when they lost they're coats of my female before I gave her a good brushing. It just fell right off in clumps, I almost didnt even have to use a brush.


 

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Wow, Cindy, that is interesting. Great pictures, beautiful wolfdog. I'll show my kids this, for sure. It almost looks like she's molting.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Breeds with harsher, oilier coats tend not to mat, whereas breeds with soft fine coats mat quite easily.
Aidan has soft, fine hair. It tangles easily and gets tiny little mats in it, even though I comb through every bit of it every day.
 

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Domesticated dogs are essentially "screwed up"... they cannot meet their own basic needs like wolves can... wild dogs have shorter fur for the most part and shed in spring, bulk in winter... they don't mind matting (and yes once in a while they will be due to circumstances out of their control... like high mud season, etc) but in Spring their fur sheds down and they brush their bodies against trees, shrubs...etc... to remove the matts and irritations. They also maintain their teeth and nails. I have a thing for learning useless facts about animals LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Domesticated dogs are essentially "screwed up"... they cannot meet their own basic needs like wolves can...
I actually have to spell this out, chapter and verse, for some people who have told me that pet dogs can manage on their own. Sure they can, which is why shelters are full stray dogs who desperately need food, veterinary care, and grooming.
 

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I think people have a hard time seeing the big picture... a wolf has evolved into the beautiful creature it is... humans have turned a feral animal into a domesticated one over 1000s of years... we've made them big, small, long legs, short legs, pushed in faces, long snouts, skinny to run, solid to fight... they've been overbred and inbred... there's NO WAY that you can stick a dog out into the wild and it will still have the instinct of it's ancestors... sure some dogs may survive BETTER than others... depending on their breed, temperment... but most... no way. Stay warm, find water (esp. in the dead of winter), kill animals for food, self groom, mate...etc... they'd walk until their last step was taken looking for a doorstep to scratch on.
 

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Wow, Cindy, that is interesting. Great pictures, beautiful wolfdog. I'll show my kids this, for sure. It almost looks like she's molting.
Thats exactly what they're doing ;) It starts mid May and is finished by the end of the month every year like clock work for my two.
 

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I disagree that no domestic dog can survive in the wild. The Dingo was born from escaped domestic pet dogs brought to australia, they thrived and bred to create their own "species" some scientists disagree that the dingo is even a different species yet and some say it is just a breed of dog.
 
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