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I grew up in a rural environment where there is a lot bush area (where wolves live).
Because most farmers don't bother to neuter and spay their dogs, wolf hybrids are not uncommon. My cousins and close family friends had some that I interacted with on a regular basis:
Random was/is the calmest "dog" I've ever met, and was always well behaved.
Hobo was hyper and very aggressive.
I'm not sure on the details, but I guess some law got passed that said people weren't allowed to own wolf hybrids (too many attacks).
Hobo was taken away (a neighbor reported that it was a wolf hybrid) and most likely euthanized.
Now I'm learning that people actively search out to buy wolf hybrids. I watched the CM episode about Wold hybrids and I can see how it's problematic.
What do you think?
Should wolf hybrids be legal or illegal? Are they dangerous?
 

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I don't think they should be intentionally bred, but I don't think they should be euthanized just because they are wolf-hybrids either.
I think it's situational for their dangerousness. Where the person lives is a factor, as well as what the person expects of the dog.
 

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Any large dog is a disaster waiting to happen in the right (wrong?) situation. The CM episode with "wolf-dogs" was a complete crock - most of the dogs were actually some type of husky or malamute cross without any trace of wolf in their behavior or conformation outside of the similarities that those two breeds have to wolves. The "expert" that they used, Jenny McCarthy, has absolutely no credentials that back up her claim as an expert in wolf-dogs (she's basically a private Hollywood dog trainer), most notably she has no formal training in either animal training or animal behavior.

My personal opinion is that people intentionally breeding them should be legislated/regulated (including ban), but I don't think the animals should be euthanized based solely on parentage, especially if there have been zero signs of unprovoked aggression.
 

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Well firstly, you need to ignore anything CM says. I doubt the man wipes his butt in the right direction.
Wait, he probably beats his dogs until they do it for him. lololo

I have no opinion on this. We have wolfdog owners here who have very nice wolfdogs and take very good care of them. Their animals aren't confused or ticking timebombs. Who am I to say they can't have one.
 

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I have many thoughts on this. Wolf dogs are legal in TX though some cities, counties and HOAs do not allow them. I have owned a mid content wolf dog and I presently own a low/no-content wolf dog. It is not uncommon here (and it is the same in many places) for people to advertise dogs as wolf dogs, even high content wolf dogs, when the dogs have no wolf parentage at all. Owning a high content, mid content and sometimes even low content wolf dog is not like owning a typical dog, even a northern breed dog. A dog that is "calm in the house" "gets along well with cats" "house broken" probably isn't a high content wolf dog. Yet I see them advertised daily on Craigslist 98% wolf hybrid puppy.

I am not explaining this well and I know we have a member here who owns two high content wolf dogs who does a better job at this. I have a friend who has two rescues, one is an actual wolf and one is a high content wolf dog. He is licensed and they are both animal ambassadors. His house looks like Fort Knox. We all enjoy spending time with his wolves and they are two of Remus's best buddies. Behavior wise they are not really like dogs. The issue with pretending that a dog like my girl Freyja is actually a high or even mid content wolf (and I don't tell people she is even partially wolf outside of family and places like here) is that people get to know dogs that act like dogs but are called wolves is that they get the wrong idea on how wolves look and behave. Then they go out and maybe buy a real wolf dog and wind up in trouble because their dog does not act like a husky/gsd mix. Then the dog either escapes (because the owner didn't have an enclosure for it) or turned over to a sanctuary or euthanized. Or the person is swindled by one of these CL breeders with a mix and get bored or still can't handle the dog (even huskies can be hard to handle) and insist the dog is a "wolf" so it can't be adopted out and it is euthanized. It is a constantly perpetuating problem. The woman who owns Freyja's mother truly believes she has a 98% wolf. She has CKC papers and a pedigree on both sides 4 generations back. Obviously pedigree only proves who the parents were not content but that is hard to explain. Her mother was mid content at best and her father was supposed to be an american bulldog/great dane mix.

Now as far as breeding, I love wolf dogs. Mali was the best dog I have ever owned. That is not exactly true, he was a terrible "dog" but he was a wonderful companion and I loved him very much. He will always be my heart. Some day when my children are grown I will consider owning another wolf dog, I love them. Like with any breed I am bothered by irresponsible breeders who let dogs fall into the hands of people who are unprepared for them. With this particular type of dog that is even more problematic. I am smitten right now with Blue Bay Shepherds.
 

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They shouldn't be euthinized unless dangerous. People continuing breeding them can be problematic,shelters do not take him and sanctuaries don't always have the space. So when people give them up they don't normally get a second chance,I mean they are more challenging than owning a dog. Being they tend to be more nervous than either dogs or wolves,escape artists to the highest degree,roamers,highly prey driven,stubborn as heck,not very social,impossible to potty train and if aggression kicks in than they can be a nightmare to own.
In Washington Wolf hybrids are legal to own for pretty much anyone,and to breed them to pretty much anything. I think it should be better regulated than it is.
 

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Well firstly, you need to ignore anything CM says. I doubt the man wipes his butt in the right direction.
Wait, he probably beats his dogs until they do it for him. lololo
LMAO.



I feel the same way about wolf hybrids as I do about a lot of different normal dog breeds; only people who are knowledgeable and willing to put in the time and effort to own them should have them.
 

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Some "wolfdogs" have little-to-no actual wolf in them. They're dogs. The higher content wolf hybrids are not dogs. If their owners understand this, I feel the same as with any wild animal kept as a pet: the owners need to understand and meet their unique requirements, and protect their neighbors from whatever possible consequences may come from a wild animal in the neighborhood.

To that end, and I know this is unpopular with exotic animal owners, I do want well-enforced regulations about how they are kept, at least with animals large enough to hurt me. I do not want my neighbors to allow a high-content wolfdog (or cougar or tiger or etc.) to run loose, I want somebody who knows what's required to inspect their enclosures regularly, I want somebody making sure they are properly fed. I do not want people like the typical dog owner keeping large wild animals.
 

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The CM episode with "wolf-dogs" was a complete crock - most of the dogs were actually some type of husky or malamute cross without any trace of wolf in their behavior or conformation outside of the similarities that those two breeds have to wolves.
For the most part, I agree that the wolf dog episode was a crock....but, one good message that it did send: wolf dogs aren't for everyone and shouldn't be taken lightly. Whether the dogs were or weren't wolf mix (I vote weren't....and if they were it was WAAAAAAYY back in their lineage), the message was a good one to get through to the people that take his word for gospel.
 

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The vast majority of so-called "wolf hybrids," I think, are actually Siberian husky or German shepherd mixes with no wolf at all.

I do not agree with purposely breeding wolf hybrids and do not think the average pet owner has any business owning one. That said, I definitely feel that great, responsible homes for these animals DO exist and support those individuals' ownership of their hybrids.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I have many thoughts on this. Wolf dogs are legal in TX though some cities, counties and HOAs do not allow them. I have owned a mid content wolf dog and I presently own a low/no-content wolf dog. It is not uncommon here (and it is the same in many places) for people to advertise dogs as wolf dogs, even high content wolf dogs, when the dogs have no wolf parentage at all. Owning a high content, mid content and sometimes even low content wolf dog is not like owning a typical dog, even a northern breed dog. A dog that is "calm in the house" "gets along well with cats" "house broken" probably isn't a high content wolf dog. Yet I see them advertised daily on Craigslist 98% wolf hybrid puppy.

I am not explaining this well and I know we have a member here who owns two high content wolf dogs who does a better job at this. I have a friend who has two rescues, one is an actual wolf and one is a high content wolf dog. He is licensed and they are both animal ambassadors. His house looks like Fort Knox. We all enjoy spending time with his wolves and they are two of Remus's best buddies. Behavior wise they are not really like dogs. The issue with pretending that a dog like my girl Freyja is actually a high or even mid content wolf (and I don't tell people she is even partially wolf outside of family and places like here) is that people get to know dogs that act like dogs but are called wolves is that they get the wrong idea on how wolves look and behave. Then they go out and maybe buy a real wolf dog and wind up in trouble because their dog does not act like a husky/gsd mix. Then the dog either escapes (because the owner didn't have an enclosure for it) or turned over to a sanctuary or euthanized. Or the person is swindled by one of these CL breeders with a mix and get bored or still can't handle the dog (even huskies can be hard to handle) and insist the dog is a "wolf" so it can't be adopted out and it is euthanized. It is a constantly perpetuating problem. The woman who owns Freyja's mother truly believes she has a 98% wolf. She has CKC papers and a pedigree on both sides 4 generations back. Obviously pedigree only proves who the parents were not content but that is hard to explain. Her mother was mid content at best and her father was supposed to be an american bulldog/great dane mix.

Now as far as breeding, I love wolf dogs. Mali was the best dog I have ever owned. That is not exactly true, he was a terrible "dog" but he was a wonderful companion and I loved him very much. He will always be my heart. Some day when my children are grown I will consider owning another wolf dog, I love them. Like with any breed I am bothered by irresponsible breeders who let dogs fall into the hands of people who are unprepared for them. With this particular type of dog that is even more problematic. I am smitten right now with Blue Bay Shepherds.
A very low percentage of the farmers in the area I grew-up in have in door pets. Especially dogs. People use to think my immediate family was strange for allowing cats in the house.
So all the wolf dogs were always outdoor only. So they had free range of the farm and bush area, as well the opportunity to hunt actual wildlife.
Which is probably why I never heard any complaints about them.
I think the only reasons they kept coming back was the food source :p haha.
It makes you wonder where these so-called breeders get these "wolves" to make their crosses. haha

Any large dog is a disaster waiting to happen in the right (wrong?) situation. The CM episode with "wolf-dogs" was a complete crock - most of the dogs were actually some type of husky or malamute cross without any trace of wolf in their behavior or conformation outside of the similarities that those two breeds have to wolves. The "expert" that they used, Jenny McCarthy, has absolutely no credentials that back up her claim as an expert in wolf-dogs (she's basically a private Hollywood dog trainer), most notably she has no formal training in either animal training or animal behavior.
I never knew that, good to know though. Thanks :)
 

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Are you sure about the farm dogs who were supposedly wolf hybrids? I've heard that naturally-occurring wolf hybrids are extremely rare because dogs and wolves do not have the same mating cycles. I also can't imagine farmers allowing high-content wolf hybrids around their livestock, but that could be a local thing. Around here, any animal that looks even sort of like a wolf gets shot the second it steps off its owner's property.
 

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dont think it's right intentionally, neighbor up the road from us was breeding wolf/GSD (lets mention they were also running a drug house) and calling themselves a hybrid wolf sanctuary. The dogs were hideous mixture, when they did get loose they would not come to the owners, yet they could not leave the area. Very mixed up traits, as well as not worked with. The only other hybrid was one of the gals that I worked with , great dog until 11/2 or 2 years old started not responding to what she had taught him , that he had been doing really well OB wise, getting out of his kennel and running the livestock in the neighborhood.. She was considering turning him over since he was in a kennel that was reinforced on all sides and that was it. Just don't think wolves and dogs area a hybrid that is meant to be.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Are you sure about the farm dogs who were supposedly wolf hybrids? I've heard that naturally-occurring wolf hybrids are extremely rare because dogs and wolves do not have the same mating cycles. I also can't imagine farmers allowing high-content wolf hybrids around their livestock, but that could be a local thing. Around here, any animal that looks even sort of like a wolf gets shot the second it steps off its owner's property.
No I'm not sure, this is just what I've been told by the owners. Wolves are apparently not a huge concern in the area. Everyone seemed more concerned about the coyotes and foxes killing livestock and cougars attacking people.
Perhaps it happens because we have a shorter warm season where I live. Sometimes it snows on my birthday (May 19th) where I live . haha
You never got runaway dogs just randomly start living at your farm?
We got that all the time. Nobody shot them. We only shot coyotes on sight (from what I remember).
 

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No, farmers here don't like loose dogs. A few will keep dogs who show up but most won't :(. The one guy I knew who kept every dog who showed up ended up with 10+ dogs which is what happens when word gets around. I have never lived out of town, but I just bought an acreage. . .hope not too many animals show up.

My cousins' Husky got shot by their neighbor and he was all "look at the wolf I shot!!1!". I've also known GSD mixes who met the same end.
 

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No, farmers here don't like loose dogs. A few will keep dogs who show up but most won't :(. The one guy I knew who kept every dog who showed up ended up with 10+ dogs which is what happens when word gets around. I have never lived out of town, but I just bought an acreage. . .hope not too many animals show up.

My cousins' Husky got shot by their neighbor and he was all "look at the wolf I shot!!1!". I've also known GSD mixes who met the same end.
That's really unfortunate.
Hopefully people won't lose too many pets like that.

Good luck with your acreage though,
animals typically show up if there's a food source.
 

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Animals typically show up when people dump them too :/. I'm afraid that's going to be a problem.

There was a guy in the area who had an African lion, and the mail carrier claimed he saw him out of his enclosure fairly frequently . While nothing ever happened because of that particular lion, that's exactly what I don't want my neighbors to do, whether big cats or wolves/wolf hybrids. There really isn't a lot of regulation, and what rules exist are not well enforced.
 

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My cousins' Husky got shot by their neighbor and he was all "look at the wolf I shot!!1!". I've also known GSD mixes who met the same end.
My landlord shot at my solid white, pink nosed, blue eyed husky. Said he thought she was a wolf.
She's not much bigger than a beagle. About 30 pounds with a tail that lays flat against her back.
He's not the only one to think that.

People easily assume certain breeds or mixes are wolves based on ears and coat color. Mostly because movies and TV use dogs like these or low content wolfdogs. Teaches people the opposite of what a wolf looks like.
 

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I had two, while growing up in the 90's. They were a father and son, and they were the real deal with a very high concentration. I want to say the son was around 75% - 80% timber wolf. The dogs belonged to my step dad at the time, who had previously lived....somewhere. lol can't recall the exact area, but it was a place with a wolf population.

Anyways, the dogs were timber wolf/Alaskan malamute crosses, and as wild as wild could be. They were incredibly intelligent, insane, escape artists, and were nervous of people they didn't know. There were only 3 people on this planet they liked. My step dad, my mom, and myself. Everyone else freaked them out. They were far from easy to keep... Their existance was something that never should have happened to begin with. But they were great dogs, who I loved and still think about to this day.

I should write a book about the experience sometime.
 

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I also don't agree with intentionally breeding them and think there needs to be more regulation in keeping wild animals in general.

I follow Big Cat Rescue (check them out on youtube/facebook if you haven't already) and the living situations (if you can call them that) that they rescue the big cats from are just... horrific. The worst part being that according to the law, the so called 'owners' aren't doing anything wrong. It's literally okay to keep a tiger in a cage with nothing but bare concrete floor for them to pace back and forth all day, every day.

I think too many people expect to just get a 'cool pet' and are in no way prepared for the responsibility and dedication having a wild (or semi-wild) animal takes.
 
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