Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 42 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)


Hi to all, I'm new to the group and would just like to get some stories about our hybrid friends. I know there are negative stories out there as well and I also know not everyone is capable of handling them which in my opinion is why we have negative stories, but that is strictly my opinion. I have had the honor of sharing my home, life and love with three of them, but I used to train dogs also. So if anyone has any stories I would love to hear from a fellow hybrid lover.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,779 Posts
Very old story, seen and heard through the eyes of a child (me).

We lived in Northern Ontario for a couple of years as my dad took a job there. Across the road in a subdivision of a small city (Northbay - in the 60s) was a wonderful lady who had taken in a dog that she claimed was a wolf hybrid. His name was Curly, and we called him King Curly cuz we thought that suited him. I would have to do a bunch of digging for photos that my dad has possession of, but I believe this guy DID look that part.

This neighbor, Adele, had lost both her children to cystic fibrosis, and had a void, so a family with six - mostly ADHD - attention seeking children across the road somehow looked inviting to her and she made a great effort to befriend our family. Her husband often worked away. We did lots with her and her dog, and our dogs, and Curly pulled sleds and carts and, by my memory, was totally trustable with us kids that were 5 and up. He was known as a cat killer, and as not trustable by those that kept rabbits in the area, and Adele had been warned by many that if he was ever found loose he would be shot. We often walked him for her as he was a dog that needed exercise and she was middle aged and arthritic.

We were sitting with him in our livingroom one night (dogsitting) while watching T.V. Anyone remember Bonanza? Anyway, at one point he sidled over to lay on the rug with his back to the sofa just under where my infant sister was sleeping on a blanket. I remember being startled as my mom snapped 'Curly what are you doing', and sure enough he had my sisters bare ankle in his mouth and looked to be giving it a pull like he was going to drag her somewhere.

Curly was then no longer babysat in our home. He still pulled us on sleds and in carts, but there was a tighter eye held.

SOB
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
689 Posts
I have never owned a hybrid (I don't know enough about them) but I would like to do rescue or foster work with them in the future if it's possible for me.

A while back when I was about 11 years old my mom, a few friends and I went on a mission trip to a Native American village in Northern Ontario. They have a lot of hybrids up there that roam the streets.
While I was there I made a point to make friends with some of the hybrids and by the time we left, I had a pack of 4 that would follow me around when ever I was outside. (I like to think that they just wanted to be with me but it probably had something to do with the treats in my pocket ;) )
I was able to pet and play with them after a few treats and sometimes I would throw sticks for them. I tried to convince my mom to bring them home with us but you can imagine what her answer was...

Aside from that, that's all I got pertaining to hybrids. :)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Well I appreciate the story and I'm sure everyone knows there is an exception to every breed, actually we can assume what curly was about to do but we will never know. He may have been a higher wolf content than mine which saber was 75%, I say was because I lost him in 2006 due to oral cancer he was 12. Lakota is also 75% and I don't know about chase because I rescued him at 6 months of age. I trained all three of them and had many comments to the affect, "That dog minds better than most kids." Now I don't know about curly but Saber was laying in the floor and a friends 18 month old son was walking around Saber with big handfuls of hair, for balance lol, and Saber did absolutely nothing. I however got the baby because it wouldn't have been fair no matter the breed. Chase was Being fed green beans by hand from a two year old. The toddler would pic up a green bean, insert it into his mouth, naturally his whole hand would disappeare and when it reappeared the only thing missing was the green bean. Now I never left them unsupervised but I have been like that with all my dogs not just the hybrids but to tell the truth, the hybrids were more trustworthy than the husky. Thanks again for your story but like I said I'm looking for happy stories from fellow hybrid lovers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,131 Posts
toripoad Your dogs are cute but I don't see any wolf at all in the 1st and last one. The middle one is iffy to me. A member here has wolfdogs some who are 50% wolf(one wolf parent) and they even look WAY more wolfish than your three.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Oh to be able to live with that many animals, Heaven, I don't have the space. Now as far as fostering hybrids, I don't recommend it and here's why. Hybrids aren't exactly like normal dogs. It not only takes a certain personality, if they aren't raised with that many animals it would be very hard to get them used to each other and someone would end up getting hurt, not necessarily you. Even if you didn't have all the animals, I would research them well, only take on young ones, and even then there is no promise you wouldn't get hurt. Like I said before, it takes a certain personality.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Lol, I have had people say that and I have also had people flat out tell me they could tell there was wolf in my dogs. The first dog was registered as were his parents so I know the third one, his son, was as well. Now the second being a rescue, there is no way I can know 100% sure but I asked my vet who works with exotics and she said she would bet money. Now before I got saber I did a lot of research and found out that no matter what the percentage as long as there is any dog in the mix you can have pups that look full wolf, pups that look full dog, and some that look mixed. That is true with any two dogs that are a mix.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
689 Posts
Oh to be able to live with that many animals, Heaven, I don't have the space. Now as far as fostering hybrids, I don't recommend it and here's why. Hybrids aren't exactly like normal dogs. It not only takes a certain personality, if they aren't raised with that many animals it would be very hard to get them used to each other and someone would end up getting hurt, not necessarily you. Even if you didn't have all the animals, I would research them well, only take on young ones, and even then there is no promise you wouldn't get hurt. Like I said before, it takes a certain personality.
Yes, I know. ;) No hybrid is going to come in my door with out me going to a hybrid sanctuary/rescue and working under someone for a while who has experience with them. This is not something I'm doing tomorrow...maybe years from now if I have the time and space...maybe. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,766 Posts
Lol, I have had people say that and I have also had people flat out tell me they could tell there was wolf in my dogs. The first dog was registered as were his parents so I know the third one, his son, was as well.
Registered as what? Do they have a wolfdog registry? How do they prove percentages and actual wolf heritage?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,145 Posts
I was hoping nekomi and/or Cindy would chime in, because they are both very good at explaining exactly what features to look for in wolfdogs. I know enough to say I don't think there's much, if any, wolf in those dogs based on their features but I can't really articulate the points well.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
The most reputable registry I know of is the UCA. If the parents are registered then it is the same as registering a purebred. If not then as far as I remember they have to be a year of age, bloodtyped and a recent photo submitted. I never did it because I had no desire for papers, just companions. Now all I was looking for with this forum was to hear some cute stories, I'm not trying to breed or sell my boys so I'm not sure why your so concerned with whether they are or aren't part wolf. If your friends are knowledgeable about hybrids then they know a litter can have several looks, they don't always all look Wolfy or like dogs. Sometimes yes sometimes no. I don't know how I did it but I'm sorry I've rustled your feathers._
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,412 Posts
Now all I was looking for with this forum was to hear some cute stories, I'm not trying to breed or sell my boys so I'm not sure why your so concerned with whether they are or aren't part wolf.
I think people are concerned because there are a lot of people out there who claim to have high-content wolfdogs, but really just have huskies, malamutes or mixes. They go around telling everyone that their well-behaved, friendly dogs are high-content wolfdogs, and then other people get the impression that wolfdogs make great, easy-to-own pets. Those people go out and find themselves an actual high-content wolfdog and are woefully unprepared for what happens next. Our friends on this forum help rescue wolfdogs that people like that couldn't handle, and they know a ton about them. :)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
It is very hard to tell from just a picture. The people across the street used to call Lakota wolf dog until we met and I told them his name so I guess he looks the part in person, that or maybe its the constant howling. I called the people at wolf park up in Ind and they were nice enough to let me bring Saber up and evaluate him because even though his dad looked 100% his mom looked 0% to me. That is where I found out about having different looks in one litter. I think they would be qualified to tell, plus he never barked a day in his 12 years, just howled. I gotta ask, why are you so concerned with proving my dogs aren't hybrids?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,195 Posts
I think people are concerned because there are a lot of people out there who claim to have high-content wolfdogs, but really just have huskies, malamutes or mixes. They go around telling everyone that their well-behaved, friendly dogs are high-content wolfdogs, and then other people get the impression that wolfdogs make great, easy-to-own pets. Those people go out and find themselves an actual high-content wolfdog and are woefully unprepared for what happens next. Our friends on this forum help rescue wolfdogs that people like that couldn't handle, and they know a ton about them. :)
Where is the "like" button when you need one???
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
To start with I have mentioned several times that it takes a certain personality to raise them and if you read the advise I gave to musherchic, I recommended against it. I only mentioned the percentages afterwards, and in many places have made sure to let people know they aren't for everyone and that I used to train dogs. I even tried to get across in the very first statement that they aren't for everyone.
 
1 - 20 of 42 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top