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She's a Belgian Malinois who's now 4 months. When I got her, she was almost 3 months.

She was a gift to me, so her previous owners said she's gotten her first 5in1 vaccine at 2 and a half months, which was pretty late. Her next vaccine was supposed to be 3 weeks later. She's been really active with a good appetite and everything. No skin problems or anything, just a healthy pup. A few days before her 2nd vaccination, she got a fever and her back legs wasn't working properly.I thought she may have had a tick disease since I did found a few ticks on her. She refused to eat or drink anything and was starting to feel dehydrated. I brought to the nearest vet, and was told she needed to be under IV fluids for 3 days. 300ml per day, and I was given 1ml of anti bacterial and 1ml of electrolyte, which I would have to inject into her IV fluids once a day. Her vet said she had a bacterial virus( never mentioned which) because her vaccines weren't updated. I thought it was a tick disease since her legs weren't working.

Also, vet never took any tests. Only took her temperature. I asked about her back legs, and she asked me if my puppy is loose around the house, then I said she is from the morning I wake up until I sleep(about 12AM). She sleeps on the sofa, but when she knows I'm about to sleep, she'll enter her crate. She also plays football(soccer) with my brothers. Then the vet said it's because a puppy shouldn't have much freedom and should be only in her cage. I, somewhat, won't agree for my puppy to be 24/7 locked up. It's actually the first time I've heard of it, and she says that's the reason why her legs was a little stiff.

Kaia is now doing well. Her energy is back to normal and so is her playfulness and nosiness to see what's on my phone or laptop, LOL. She's taking some supplements now and Doxycycline.

Her vet said, her first vaccination is 'useless' now, and her whole vaccination needs to start over again. I'd like to know if she would need now three 5in1 shots or continue her old shots and just two 5in1 shots?

Also, there's only 2 vets in our area, and I inquired about her vaccines.
First vet says, 3 5in1 shots and 1 rabies shot, every 2 weeks.
Second vet, 4 5in1 shots and 1 rabies shot every 2-3 weeks.

Which would you prefer? Every 2 or 3 weeks? Will I have to start her vaccines all over again? Do you think it's possible for a puppy to get a bacterial infection 3(or maybe 4 or 5, if her breeders never told the truth) weeks after a vaccine? Thanks in advanced.
 

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At her age (around 16 weeks now, if I'm reading it correctly?) she only needs 2 boosters of the combination, 3-4 weeks apart. The rabies can be given with either one or completely separately.
 

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I'm not a vet but Sass is. I do agree with her though from what my own vets have instructed me when we got foster puppies into rescue that had unknown vaccine status. The first vaccine at 6 or 8 weeks doesn't usually "take" anyway because the mom's antibodies are still present. That's the reason for multiple puppy vaccines several weeks apart; no real way to tell when the mom's antibodies will wear off in the puppy and you want to minimize the time frame between losing the maternal protection and gaining the protection from the vaccine.

One study showed that "at six weeks of age, 25% of the puppies could be immunized. At 9 weeks of age, 40% of the puppies were able to respond to the vaccine. The number increased to 60% by 16 weeks of age, and by 18 weeks, 95% of the puppies were protected by the vaccine."

As far as I know though, puppy vaccines wouldn't have much to do with preventing a bacterial infection or a bacterial virus (bacteriophage). The Lyme vaccine yes, but that's not a standard puppy vaccine unless you specifically ask for it in most places.

I would want a puppy loose or able to move around when I am home to watch it, gotta move around to build muscle and grow normally. I wouldn't want the puppy running on a leash or going on lengthy hikes, but certainly not crated all the time either.
 

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I can't even imagine worse advise than to keep a puppy crated ALL the time and not let them run around ever. Bodies need to be used to develop properly and those muscles, nerves, and other tissues need input and feedback for the puppy to even learn how her body works.

Plus, malinois. Crated all of the time? hahaaaaaaaaaaa no.
 

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I can't even imagine worse advise than to keep a puppy crated ALL the time and not let them run around ever. Bodies need to be used to develop properly and those muscles, nerves, and other tissues need input and feedback for the puppy to even learn how her body works.

Plus, malinois. Crated all of the time? hahaaaaaaaaaaa no.
Not if you'd like your mal to have teeth anyway.

Time for a new vet, OP!
 

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At this age, a one time vaccination for Parvo/Distemper is sufficient. No need to "boost" anything. You can titer at 1 year to make sure her anti-body levels are adequate.

Not sure what your laws are for rabies (we have no rabies requirement here) but I would hold off on that one for as long as you can, and definitely give it separately from the other vaccines.

http://drjeandoddspethealthresource.tumblr.com/post/66693331640/dodds-dog-vaccination-protocol-2013-2014#.Vd4rIrnbKCo
In the article you post, Dr. Dobbs actually recommends two jabs for the puppy (9-10 weeks and 14-16 weeks) and a booster at one year, titre may be substituted for the one year booster.
 

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Yep, the OP says the dog got her first shot at 8.5 weeks. She is now 16 weeks, so give the dog one more vaccination. At 12 months titer the dog, if the dog shows sufficient titer levels, no need to re-vaccinate at that time. Titers can be continued every 3 years following.
 

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Yep, the OP says the dog got her first shot at 8.5 weeks. She is now 16 weeks, so give the dog one more vaccination. At 12 months titer the dog, if the dog shows sufficient titer levels, no need to re-vaccinate at that time. Titers can be continued every 3 years following.
OP isn't in North America or Western Europe. It may be quite difficult to find a vet that will even do titers, let alone at a reasonable cost. If there is a significent stray population or people who do not vaccinate their dogs, personally I would rather do two vaccinations at 16 weeks and say, 20 weeks rather than chance that the dog has coverage from just the 16 week vaccine until a year passes by and titers or a booster are done. Also since the age of the dog may be in question (based on the intro posts from OP) and if the dog is younger than 16 weeks or so, it can reduce the effectivity of the vaccine at that time.
 

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OP isn't in North America or Western Europe. It may be quite difficult to find a vet that will even do titers, let alone at a reasonable cost. If there is a significent stray population or people who do not vaccinate their dogs, personally I would rather do two vaccinations at 16 weeks and say, 20 weeks rather than chance that the dog has coverage from just the 16 week vaccine until a year passes by and titers or a booster are done. Also since the age of the dog may be in question (based on the intro posts from OP) and if the dog is younger than 16 weeks or so, it can reduce the effectivity of the vaccine at that time.
Agreed. Not everyone has the luxury of being more afraid of a vaccine than the disease it protects against.
 

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LOL calm down, I gave my opinion and what my OPINION was based on. The OP can take what she needs and leave what won't work for her.

There is definitely a theme of argue about who's right and who's wrong on this board, instead of give YOUR opinion and move on.

After having a dog 20 minutes from death, blood running from his nose and mouth, listless and barely breathing following a routine Rabies vaccine (taking a further 5 days of intensive care to recoup), I would say I am pretty conservative when it comes to vaccination. However, since you are making assumptions about what the OP does and does not have access to, which of course, according to you, they probably couldn't afford - let's go with your post ;)

( I have had 2 further very severe vaccine reactions with puppies from litters, one nearly dying as well, the other was not so bad. 2 different litters, with different genetics and 2 different companies vaccines).

I am not saying that I am fearful of vaccinating completely, just conservatively. But that is MY opinion, if it doesn't work for the OP, then it doesn't work.
 

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LOL calm down, I gave my opinion and what my OPINION was based on. The OP can take what she needs and leave what won't work for her.
QUOTE]

Sass and Shell were very respectful in their disagreement with you, I'd suggest you return the favour. The only one getting worked up here right now is you.

There is definitely a theme of argue about who's right and who's wrong on this board, instead of give YOUR opinion and move on.
This comment is rather ironic, given that you are currently doing exactly what you accuse the members of this board of doing.

Healthy debates are encouraged on this forum, disrespectful and rude behaviour isn't.
 

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Since when does "reasonable cost" translate to "probably couldn't afford"? Even around my area, titers are either unavailable or done by only a few offices at a cost many times higher than the vaccines themselves. Thus, not a reasonable cost in comparison to vet care in general.

"May not have access to" is in regard to the general region and is not an assumption but a potential status, especially in light of the unusual advice already given by the two vets referenced.

The risk from vaccines is very low so in areas where rabies for example is endemic, the risk to humans is unaccaptable to not vaccinate or significantly delay vaccines. In high parvo risk areas, while not a human health risk, the scales also strongly tilt towards two vaccines since a vaccine at 16 weeks leaves somewhere up to 40% of puppies unprotected and while waiting another couple weeks means more likely for a single vaccine to take hold, it also leaves the puppy more vulnerable for several more weeks and depending on area, that's a much bigger risk than a second vaccine. My vets office sees several parvo cases every week and that's just one clinic of maybe 2 dozen in the city

It is up to the OP to decide, but its not unreasonable to consider that risk factors vary widely by area too
 

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One study showed that "at six weeks of age, 25% of the puppies could be immunized. At 9 weeks of age, 40% of the puppies were able to respond to the vaccine. The number increased to 60% by 16 weeks of age, and by 18 weeks, 95% of the puppies were protected by the vaccine."
Legitimate question: why do two shots 3 to 4 weeks apart? Why not just said until 18 weeks and give vaccines then?
 

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Legitimate question: why do two shots 3 to 4 weeks apart? Why not just said until 18 weeks and give vaccines then?
Because the maternal antibodies (assuming the mom dog was vaccinated) wear off at an unknown time in each puppy. So in some puppies, they might lose maternal protection at 8 weeks and if you didn't vaccinate them until 18 weeks, they would have no protection against parvo or distemper for 10 full weeks. Which, in some areas might be an acceptable risk but in many areas, that would be a much bigger risk than an extra vaccine or two. The idea is to catch that window of time between losing maternal protection and the vaccine that will "take hold" and make it as small of time frame as possible.
since rabies isn't something a dog can catch by walking where a contagious dog peed or pooped like parvo, it is done once at a time when the pup is old enough that the chances are high it will be effective.

Sass might have more to add, I mostly have dealt with foster puppies and young adults with unknown or no vaccines and read up on what they would need
 

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Puppies get some immunity from the mother. That immunity protects the puppies but also blocks the vaccine from working. Maternal immunity for different diseases "wears off" at different times. Some immunity might be gone at 8 weeks, some might be gone at 10 weeks, etc. At 18 weeks, all of the maternal immunity should be gone. Thus, a vaccine at 18 weeks should be effective. However, what if the immunity for parvo wore off at 10 weeks? Then the pup would have 8 weeks of no protection before the 18 week vax. By doing 2-3 vaccinations 2-4 weeks apart, we are able to protect for diseases as the maternal antibodies decrease. Vaccines used to be at 8-12-16 weeks, (additional vax for some breeds up to 22 weeks). Now we typically only vax until just after 12 weeks, then every 1-3 years. The label on most vaccinations calls for at least 2 vaccinations initially.

You are right, that is a legit question.
 
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