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No, not really. It's pretty easy to do. I have a lot of fun doing it.

The OP was unconcerned about the exercise requirements. He said that he was fine doing two long walks a day (plenty for a Great Dane) and has done his research on the breed. I have no reason to assume he's not responsible.
I thought the same thing about the OP.

You can't tell a good dog owner by solely (or even mostly) how long they can spend home with their dog. For a little anecdote, I know two bc owners. One has a yard and stays at home the other has no yard and works and goes to school. But the lady that stays at home with the yard keeps her dog outside and really does little with it even though she could. That dog is a mess. The girl that has the bc in an apartment and it's home alone 8-9 hours a day has a very well adjusted dog because she knows what that kind of dog needs and makes sure to spend her free time giving him what he needs.
 

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No, not really. It's pretty easy to do. I have a lot of fun doing it.
I give my dogs a one hour run before work and a one hour run after work. I too find this to be fun and easy. I sometimes wonder who looks forward more to this, me or the dogs.:D

You can't tell a good dog owner by solely (or even mostly) how long they can spend home with their dog.
You are right. But, there are situations that are more ideal for dogs then others. A person can work all day and then have commitment required to take care of the dog. Not all do. That is all that I am pointing out.

Its like going to the doctor and being perscribed a new drug. You would want to not only know how effective it will be, but all the possible side effects. Look at me as the possible side effects person.

The girl that has the bc in an apartment and it's home alone 8-9 hours a day has a very well adjusted dog because she knows what that kind of dog needs and makes sure to spend her free time giving him what he needs.
How did she know this? Someone either pointed it out to her or she did her homework. If another person tries the same thing with a "BC", without knowing all the requirements of the breed, it might not trun out well.
 

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I am a little hesitant to get a daily dog walker for the sake of security and cost too.

That's one thing I have considered... having more than 1 dog would take care of him/her being so alone for the 9 hours.

Anyway, chances are I will most likely hold off since I don't really like the idea of raising a god in the city. I feel so bad that dogs here don't even know to pee on grass, and just go where they please on the sidewalk or street (my old dog knew when i lived in a house with my parents). Not only that, then the pee moves on the conrete and often onto their feet. So gross!
No offense, but you live in New York City. Every big city is rife with dog walkers. Every single working person I know who owns a dog in Chicago and New York City has either a walker, or daycare.

There is almost no reason to be worried about security. Walkers are bonded and insured, not to mention that most walkers tend to be musicians, artists, creative types who wouldn't even consider stealing (I was a walker for a while).

If you can't stomach the cost of a walker (on average, $12 for half an hour), what are you going to do if you get hit with a big vet bill?

Nine hours is too long to leave a dog alone regularly.

Get the dog, don't worry about security and walkers (or lock up your valuable jewelry and what have you -- trust me, no walker is going to steal your television set), and enjoy your new companion.
 

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A healthy, adult dog should not have an issue holding their pee/poop for 9 hours.
Personally, I think there's more to it than just holding pee or poop. A large dog in a small NYC apartment for 9 hours alone for 5 days a week? I guess our opinions vary on what's acceptable, but for me, that would not be a comfortable situation.

I really don't understand why the OP doesn't hire a dog walker. That would basically resolve the issue. A good 20-30 minute romp with a walker to break up 9 hours alone in a small city apartment sounds like a wise choice.
 

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A good 20-30 minute romp with a walker to break up 9 hours alone in a small city apartment sounds like a wise choice.
Please stop, you are trying to use logic and trying to make sense. You will even be called a meanie!;)
 

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Personally, I think there's more to it than just holding pee or poop. A large dog in a small NYC apartment for 9 hours alone for 5 days a week? I guess our opinions vary on what's acceptable, but for me, that would not be a comfortable situation.

I really don't understand why the OP doesn't hire a dog walker. That would basically resolve the issue. A good 20-30 minute romp with a walker to break up 9 hours alone in a small city apartment sounds like a wise choice.
I agree about the dog walker. That would be ideal.

Perhaps though some time alone during the day spent snoozing in a comfy chair may be preferable to that of one in a shelter?
 

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Please stop, you are trying to use logic and trying to make sense. You will even be called a meanie!;)
She's taking an equation of 73+84+2+23+2+700=884

and breaking it down to 2+2=4.

Logical, in that specific context, yes. But completely oblivious to every other factor in the scenarios.

It's well known that dogs, in the wild and at home, sleep 16 hours a day. They are generally only awake during the early morning and the evening. They sleep at night when it's dark and during the day when it's hot out.

So you can ignore all the reason if you want, but fact is, your dog is sleeping 16 hours, on average. If it's not during the 8 hours that you are home, then it must be at night, and during the day while you're at work.

Dogs are not humans. Humans only need 8 hours of sleep to be fine. Dogs need more.
 

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Health Issue?

I am no expert on great Danes by any means. But, don't these and other super-size dogs have more health problems then "normal" size dogs. If I remember correctly, some of the health issues with really big dogs have to do with joints. Isn't moderate exercise considered beneficial for this? Then wouldn't it be harmful for such a dog to remain motionless for long periods of time? Wouldn't a dog walker help this?
 

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Health Issue?

I am no expert on great Danes by any means. But, don't these and other super-size dogs have more health problems then "normal" size dogs. If I remember correctly, some of the health issues with really big dogs have to do with joints. Isn't moderate exercise considered beneficial for this? Then wouldn't it be harmful for such a dog to remain motionless for long periods of time? Wouldn't a dog walker help this?
No, again, they sleep 16 hours a day. That's healthy for them to do.
 

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Perhaps though some time alone during the day spent snoozing in a comfy chair may be preferable to that of one in a shelter?
That's true -- I can't argue with that!! Hopefully the dog doesn't end up back at the shelter if the OP finds out, in fact, due to the dog's personality or past experience, he can't be left alone for 9 hours. Each dog is different.

But you're right. I always say, a small city apartment is bigger than the cage a homeless dog is living in now.

I'm a rescue dog owner myself.
 

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No, again, they sleep 16 hours a day. That's healthy for them to do.
Thanks for the info. Like I said, I am no Great Dane expert, so you helped clear that. The dog that you have pictured on this forum dosen't look like a Great Dane at all.
 

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She's taking an equation of 73+84+2+23+2+700=884

and breaking it down to 2+2=4.

Logical, in that specific context, yes. But completely oblivious to every other factor in the scenarios.

It's well known that dogs, in the wild and at home, sleep 16 hours a day. They are generally only awake during the early morning and the evening. They sleep at night when it's dark and during the day when it's hot out.

So you can ignore all the reason if you want, but fact is, your dog is sleeping 16 hours, on average. If it's not during the 8 hours that you are home, then it must be at night, and during the day while you're at work.

Dogs are not humans. Humans only need 8 hours of sleep to be fine. Dogs need more.
I enjoy your posts and respect your opinion, so I'm not going to argue with you because what we each fundamentally believe about dogs is so clearly different, there's no real meeting point. For example, I don't subscribe to the belief that we can compare dogs that have been domesticated for thousands of years to wild dogs.

While I do agree that dogs sleep more than 12 hours a day, my preference would be for my dog to be engaged during the day as much as possible with naps in between and sleeping at night while I'm sleeping. This is obviously my preference and I don't expect everyone else to adhere to it... especially because I work only part-time from home. I realize this isn't everyone's situation.

I think everyone on this forum loves dogs so much, and are such great dog owners themselves (hence us spending hours here, talking about our pets), we tend to forget that not everyone is. There are a lot of "returns," when a new owner finds out a dog isn't what he thought it would be, or a dog won't conform to is schedule.

The big red flag for me is that the OP doesn't want a dog walker due to "security and cost." Any reasonable person living in any big city, whether it's Los Angeles, Chicago, or New York City who has done the most basic research into dog care would realize (a) there's no reason to be concerned about security with dog walkers (b) pretty much everyone has one (c) it's a necessary cost for big dogs in small apartments without backyards.

I certainly respect your right to disagree, and that's fine. But I just wanted to explain my point of view, in case the OP is listening. :)
 

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I'm not comparing them to wild dogs. I said both domesticated and wild dogs sleep 16 hours a day.

Your preference that dogs get breaks for play and then nap times is a human preference, not a dog preference. If that's what you think should happen, then that's your own thing. But it doesn't make it humane, or better. Dogs have always been the type to sleep during the daytime and be active in the mornings and evenings.

That they do adapt to our lifestyle is just that, adapting. Dogs are forced to adapt to our way of life. They are forced to adapt to your preference of being active for a few hours then napping during the day. They are forced to adapt to other people's preference of being active in the morning before work, then crated during the day, then active in the evening.

The latter more closely mimics what dogs would do, if they had the choice. But in both scenarios, they are forced to adapt to our lifestyles. So your choice is no better than those who crate their dogs.

It's also not a necessary cost. A dog walker is a luxury, not a right, for dogs. Big dogs are less active than small dogs, for that matter.

http://www.kingdomofpets.com/dogobediencetraining/dogbreeds/great-dane.php

Apparently some great Dane experts seem to think that this breed requires at least some exercise every day.
Which the OP already said he'd provide.

From your link:

This large dog does need a lot of exercise, and will enjoy a long daily walk. However, be careful not to overdo the exercise due to its susceptibility to heart disease.
The OP said he'd give two long walks a day. Guess he's doing far more than the minimum they recommend!
 

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It's also not a necessary cost. A dog walker is a luxury, not a right, for dogs. Big dogs are less active than small dogs, for that matter.
I also think dogs are a luxury, not a right, for humans.

By the way, I think your sweeping generalization about big dogs being less active than small dogs incredibly inaccurate. A Rhodesian Ridgeback is probably not less active than a shitzsu. Not to mention that the amount of exercise needed to wear out a big dog is considerably more than a small dog.

But again, we pretty much disagree about everything. It takes all kinds to make the world go around. The difference is that I can acknowledge we disagree on fundamental issues without there being a clear right and wrong. On the other hand, you seem to either directly or indirectly insist that only your view point is correct by speaking from a point of authority rather than opinion.

Just like there's more than one way to raise a child, there's more than one way to raise a dog.
 

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On the other hand, you seem to either directly or indirectly insist that only your view point is correct.
There was a study done on humans several years ago. They concluded the more a person claims to know the less they actually do. Some people do not even know enough to know when they are wrong. On a math test given to subjects, the testers that expressed some doubts about how they did outscored the ones that bragged the test was easy.

It is sort of like the guy who thinks his jokes are funny, but he doesn't know enough to realize they aren't.
 

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Okey dokey, time to define what I mean by big dog. By big dog, I'm talking about dogs like the English Mastiff, Great Dane, and so on. I'm not talking about dogs in the 40-80 pound range, which most working dogs are.

And I never commented on whether dogs are a luxury or a right for people. Your opinion is that the fact he doesn't want to pay for a dog walker being a red flag is far more a criticism than anything I've ever said. So let's not try to point fingers at who is more critical than the other, and who is just stating opinions, etc.

Large dogs like Great Danes and Mastiffs sleep and rest far more than the average dog. It's a must, to take care of their joints. Any large dog owner would tell you that. As such, they need a dog walker even less than the average dog.

There was a study done on humans several years ago. They concluded the more a person claims to know the less they actually do. Some people do not even know enough to know when they are wrong. On a math test given to subjects, the testers that expressed some doubts about how they did outscored the ones that bragged the test was easy.

It is sort of like the guy who thinks his jokes are funny, but he doesn't know enough to realize they aren't.
You do realize that I could turn that around right back at you, right? Alas, when in doubt, attack the person's credibility!
 
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