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My boyfriend has a pit bull that's about two years old, I just got a doberman puppy and we're going to be moving in together, once I finish packing anyway. (Don't ask why I didn't wait to get the doberman until we moved in together when I'm getting ready to move, he was free and the lady couldn't have him anymore) Anyway, I was worried because both dogs can be quite dominant and protect their property and family. Do you think this would be a problem? The pitbull has also been around many other dogs and there was never a problem, I'm just a little worried. Both dogs are males and were both neutered. The pit lives with a Terrier Mix and another mixed dog, Im not sure what he is right now. Also, the Doberman is about 7 months old. We introduced the dogs once and they seemed to be ok. I just don't want to move them in together if theres a possibility they'll kill each other. I know someone who could take the Doberman. I just wanted to check to see if they'd be ok together before I gave him up.
 

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Are you both moving out of your current residences and into a new home together?? If so that can be a good thing as each dog will not have had a chance to claim the territory as their own.. Also if neither dog has shown aggression to one another or other dogs in the past you should be fine. Just take it slow and do not force anything. Make sure that you keep them separated, at least for a while, when you can't supervise the situation, make sure to monitor when high value treats/toys are present as well as feed seperately. Make sure to give equal amounts of together time and seperate time (training, playing, quality time with you and BF.) And enrolling the pup in some training courses may help ease any stress that may occur.
 

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it isn't the "breed" that will impact if they will get along but the individual dogs, how much training and socialization they have had and their personality.

if they have not met yet and your are moving to the boyfriend's current home, I would have them meet many times on neutral territory first. Go for walks together, parks, etc. just let them get to know one another first. If neither has a history of dog-aggression (biting) then relax about it.

remember they feel your tension so try to relax. loose leash (tight leash = tense dog = not good).
 

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It really does depend on the dogs. You have to separate them when you're not around. That's for every dog, every time. Even dogs who have gotten along great for years can suddenly get into a fight and if you're not there to break it up, you could have two dead dogs.

I would, at first, keep them separated using baby gates so they can see and smell each other but not interact too much. Let them interact for short periods of time supervised. Feed them in separate rooms with a door closed. Keep toys, rawhides, etc. off the floor when they're together. One of them may be inclined to resource guard from another dog and you don't want that, so just prevent it altogether.

Definitely introduce them on neutral territory and build up positive play and walking experiences prior to the move. Make sure you keep up with walking and training and playing with your dogs after the move so they aren't bored and filled with pent up energy, which could result in fights.
 

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I agree - it's the individuals. A well socialized Dobie and Pit with similar energy would have a grand time wrestling and tussling.

If the Dobie is lower energy, he may snark the Pit... and reactions from the Pit can vary.

In addition, even if they are fine together, you'll have to continue to watch the Dobie as he matures. He'll lose his "puppy license" around 10 mos, so the Pit might treat him more like an adult. And, as the Dobie fills out, up to 2 years, he may not let the Pit push him around... It's an age thing, not a breed thing.

My 65 lb dog used to play with a much smaller 25 lb cattle dog mix. When they both were about a year old, the cattle dog decided he had had enough and 'brutalized' my dog, out of the blue. Everyone was shocked, but we got the message - no more play time with him.
 

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It really shouldn't be too much of a problem. if you ever watch Dog Whisperer there are a lot of people who have two dogs that are aggressive/dominant towards each other in the same home and that's because the owners aren't being the leaders. Therefore, these dogs are fighting over the position to be the 'alpha' so to speak. Once the people start acting more confidently and gain trust and control of their dogs, there's no issue.
That was just an example, not saying that you're weak or lack leadership skills or anything, just saying that you might have some problems if you are.
 

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A lot of good advice above, but please don't model anything you do withthese two after Cesar Millan. It is important their early interactions are calm and pleasant. Dominance theory has been disproven long ago. If they don't get alomg, it has little to do with dominance and more to do with personality and socialization. If they have been together with no problems and you continue to give them each time and space to adjust, it should be fine. But, as others have said, be aware that their relationship could possibly change as the puppy matures.
 

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and there could be some spats here and there you need to supervise and Ive always taken my 2 dogs for walks together before trying to get them to get along in the house. It depends on the dog. I found introducing them on a walk or in a fun settings was nice. and a lot of dogs will still get into it once and awhile it happens. My Basset hound and Husky are like brothers but occasionally they will get on each others nerves and have an outburst its never serious but it sounds bad.

I actually adopted my pitbull because of a similar situation. The family had a rescue pit and then bought vader as a puppy. They were really good buddies up till Vader hit 6 months old and the other dog just went after him to the point they decided to rehome Vader for fear he would be seriously injured. They bought another male mastiff puppy soon after and both their dogs get along perfectly fine not one issue. It goes to show you that it really has to do with the individual dog.
 

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I don't think it's been said... and I saw a lot about how it depends on the dogs..

Here's your problem...
Pits, as from what I know, are known for dog aggression.
Dobermans are also known for same sex aggression, especially in males. This is not a small thing. No reputable doberman breeder or doberman rescue will place a male dog in a home with other male dogs because they are known for aggression. The problems usually start around maturity and, what you usually see, is two dogs (the other doesn't have to be a doberman) who LOVE each other and are the best of friends until the doberman hits maturity. One day they get into a nasty fight and then can never be in the same room again.


Honestly? This sucks to say, though you do seem to have prepared for this, but I think that you should rehome the doberman. Its the safest decision for all parties involved (both dogs, you, and your boyfriend).

Also, forget the Caesar Milan/Dog Whisper BS.
 

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Great opinions and all I can add is Dominance and Agression are related but entirely different behaviors,

Dominance is more of a social status between two individuals "dogs". Social status can be optained by just being a benevolent leader "fair". Example the queen of england walks into a room and ask people to sit and thousands sit "thats social status/hiearchy"

Agression is when a dog acts out "barking , growling ETC" for any emotional reason or the many types of aggression. As you mentioned protective/territorial...

Any way from my experience and studies some topics always come down to debates and opinions on both sides. I try and stay away from that and just train. In your case there are mixed reviews on the breed of same sex aggression from both sides "yes/no", science and research says it's rare if both males where neutered early, intact males yes they can show aggression to each other to compete and can also show up if neutered late.

So I think you'll never get a real true answer sometimes this happens in training and behavior of dogs. I say it comes down to the situation of the family, are they willing to put the time and effort to keep everyone SAFE no matter what happens down the line. If they get along or not are all family memebers prepared for the worse case scenerio.

General rule most trainers/vets/behavorist/PhD's will say when adding a second dog get opposite sex just to avoid the what if's.

In dog training if we look for the Why's / why my dog do this-we will come up with many many possible reasons its best to just train and pull out all our tools from toolbox to help the dog :)

good luck with your choice.
 

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It really shouldn't be too much of a problem. if you ever watch Dog Whisperer there are a lot of people who have two dogs that are aggressive/dominant towards each other in the same home and that's because the owners aren't being the leaders. Therefore, these dogs are fighting over the position to be the 'alpha' so to speak. Once the people start acting more confidently and gain trust and control of their dogs, there's no issue.
That was just an example, not saying that you're weak or lack leadership skills or anything, just saying that you might have some problems if you are.
I wouldn't model anything you see on DW, sure it works for him but not everyone has the time & commitment to make his overbesring method work: he thinks that dogs should never correct each other that thr human should be thr only one doing the correcting but here is thr deal... Humans aren't dog's & we will never have their timing, plus they know we aren't dogs, so correcting them in a dog's manner doesnt make sense to them.

FYI: humans are all ready 'dominant' in relation to dogs, think about it: food, play, access to thr out doors, water & everything else that dogs hold dear
 

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Pits, as from what I know, are known for dog aggression.
Dobermans are also known for same sex aggression, especially in males. .
This. On the pit forum I belong to there are many stories of dogs that are fine together, and one day the pit attacks the other dog, sometimes for no reason that is apparent. 100 years of selecting for dog fights has taken its toll, sadly, on this breed.

My pit mix is very very sweet with people, does 'drop it' and leave' really w/o any training (to my surprise) and had always allowed me to groom her daily from head to toe (we have ticks year-round here.) Be she is snarky with her non-related sibling, a rotti mix.

Over on this other forum they talk about 'separate, crate and rotate' meaning no dogs are left alone unattended. Some very experienced owners have even had problems when they are right there, on the sofa with their dogs.
 
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