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I found this at another forum and since I find the information important I figured I share with all dog people I know.

Research primarily at Purdue University by Dr. Larry Glickman, VMD, Ph.D, (an AKC Excellence in Canine Research Award winner), and Dr. Malathi Raghavan, DVM, Ph.D. has identified a number of feeding management and dietary factors that increase the risk of GDV. These include eating only one meal a day, feeding only dry dog food, feeding food with only small particles, and feeding a large volume of food per meal. Other feeding factors found to increase the risk of GDV were eating rapidly, increased physical activity before and eating, restricting a dog's water intake before and after eating, moistening dry food before feeding, and eating from a raised feeding bowl. Thus, some of the recommendations commonly made to prevent GDV were shown by the research to actually increase the risk of GDV. In the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association.Vol. 17, No. 10, Glickman wrote, "In addition, in univariate analysises, many of the recommendations commonly made to prevent GDV, such as raising the food bowl, moistening dry food prior to feeding, and restricting water intake before and after feeding, were associated with a significantly increased risk of GDV." Recent research, not yet published, has shown an increased risk of GDV in dogs who consumed dry foods containing fat among the first four ingredients, and an increased risk in dogs who consumed dry foods listing citric acid as a preservative - with this risk rising when foods with citric acid were moistened. Although not statistically significant, researchers found that a modest increase in risk of GDV was seen with the consumption of dry foods that listed more than one corn ingredient among the first four label ingredients, while in contrast, a pattern was observed of decreased GDV risk with an increasing number of protein ingredients of animal origin, including beef, poultry,lamb, and fish among the first four ingredients.

STUDY RECOMMENDATIONS * Feed two or more meals a day * Feed no more than one cup per 33 pounds of body weight per meal when feeding two meals a day * Feed an energy-dense diet, to reduce volume, but avoid a diet where a high amount of calories are from fats. * Feed a variety of different food types regularly. The inclusion of human foods in a primarily dry dog food diet was associated with a 59 percent decreased risk of GDV while inclusion of canned pet foods was associated with a 28 percent decreased risk * When feeding dry food, also include foods with sufficient amounts of meats and meat meals, for example: beef, lamb, poultry, and fish. * Feed a food with larger particles, and include larger pieces of meat to the diet. * Avoid moistening dry foods
Avoid moistening dry foods
• If your dog eats rapidly, find ways to try to reduce his speed of eating * Avoid raising the food bowl - place it at ground level * Try to minimize stress for your dog. Stressful events have been reported to be precipitating factors in GDV occurrence. * Restrict vigorous exercise one hour before and two hours after meals. * When you are not in close proximity to your dog, use a baby monitor to alert you if your dog is in distress. * Learn to recognize signs of GDV, which include pacing and restlessness, head turning to look at the abdomen, distention of the abdomen, rapid shallow breathing, nonproductive attempts at vomiting, and salivation. These symptoms can progress rapidly to shock and death. Get to your veterinarian or emergency hospital the moment you suspect GDV
Information from:
Emily K. Hamlyn, Boston University School of Medicine
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And you can find people that will say the complete opposite. My old male has been eating out of a raised dish since he was a young dog, so probably almost 10 years and not a single case of bloat.
 

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... but this is not "what people say". This is a scientific study, published in a veterinary journal.
 

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At the end of the day - no one can pin point with certainty what causes bloat. I feed Loki with a raised feeder because it just seems more comfortable for him.
 

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... but this is not "what people say". This is a scientific study, published in a veterinary journal.
I would like to see the tests and trials they used, how they proceed with those tests and the actual findings. I want to see what the hypothesis was before they did the tests and then the results. (As the hypothesis can often affect the results.)

I want to see why the tests were done and who funded these tests. What breeds were used and how many of each breed?

I don't care who says it, vet or otherwise. I want the information before I go using its ideas on my animals. But I always have my "crap detector" on, especially with "scientific studies".
 

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... but this is not "what people say". This is a scientific study, published in a veterinary journal.
I have been doing all the above things that they say to do to avoid bloat.....with the exception of one. I moisten the dry food.........hmmmmm? Something to seriously think about though since Abbylynn's mix of breeds are prone to bloat. I use real meat added to the dry kibble and some of the meat juice almost daily.......along with fish oil and Vitamin E every other day..............I wonder if the small amount of liquid I use would be considered harmful?.................
 

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Years ago we raised Rhodesian Ridgebacks, Greyhounds and had other large dogs. I can quite honestly say I had never heard of bloat at that time. I am quite sure we did lots of the things you are not "supposed" to do like feeding and going for a run, etc. I helped at kennels with large dogs and was involved in showing, training, etc. so you would have thought at some point I would have heard of bloat.

Of course, at that time we did not have the benefit of Computers and I know how much more you can look up on them now. We did feed more of a meat diet, not all kibble like now so maybe that made a difference.
 

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I would like to see the tests and trials they used, how they proceed with those tests and the actual findings. I want to see what the hypothesis was before they did the tests and then the results. (As the hypothesis can often affect the results.)

I want to see why the tests were done and who funded these tests. What breeds were used and how many of each breed?

I don't care who says it, vet or otherwise. I want the information before I go using its ideas on my animals. But I always have my "crap detector" on, especially with "scientific studies".
These are really interesting findings but I agree with this. I used to think science was the one unbiased subject out there but unfortunately this is untrue.
I'd be interested to read this article in its entirety, because I found two more articles that were against raised food bowls, but the first was citing the second.... So I'm wondering what tests they did to prove this or if this paper is also an accumulation of other studies.

Some of the points, like avoiding stress, avoiding gulping food, and avoiding heavy exercise after eating are what I like to believe to be common sense that applies to people as well... Who wants to go for a run after eating? :D

Still, I think it's worth sharing this information (thanks hast!). Some people might not have known what GDV is and they will have learned something.
 
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