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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys i have a cute little gsd, his name is leo. He is 6 month old. From the start he had been too lazy. First i thought that’s because he is weak or something but even now when he is older he is still too lazy even when he has slept for several hours. I think he is naturally or genetically lazy. He finishes his food very fast but never plays with me, he is never excited to go out in park or play with other dogs too. I am a marathon runner myself so i needed a compatible dog but I’m too sad to see that leo will never be that kind of dog.
Guys is there any medical procedure i can follow which will help me find the real problem?
let me know. Thanks!
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Can you explain in more detail what you mean by 'too lazy'? Growing puppies sleep a lot naturally, but if he seems to be lethargic - rarely running or acting excited at all - or in pain - limping, for example - something could be medically wrong. Have you spoken to a vet about this?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Can you explain in more detail what you mean by 'too lazy'? Growing puppies sleep a lot naturally, but if he seems to be lethargic - rarely running or acting excited at all - or in pain - limping, for example - something could be medically wrong. Have you spoken to a vet about this?
From lazy i meant he rarely gets excited to play, and even if he starts to play with me he gets tired in 5 minutes or less. I consulted with a vet and he said that leo lacks calcium in his bones but i have been giving him proper nutrition and vitamin D supplements from the time he was just 1 momth old. And i still continue to give those supplements.
 

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If the vet found a calcium deficiency even with the current diet and supplements, it sounds like something isn't working for him. Did they offer any suggestions to fix the issue? I don't know what kinds of commercial diets and supplements are available in your region, but a local vet definitely should.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If the vet found a calcium deficiency even with the current diet and supplements, it sounds like something isn't working for him. Did they offer any suggestions to fix the issue? I don't know what kinds of commercial diets and supplements are available in your region, but a local vet definitely should.
I am only giving him the supplements suggested by vet himself. I mean anyone who sees leo will be surprised to hear that he lacks calcium with those heavy bones. Even i find it hard to believe now. So please let me know if there is anything called lazy genetics which is not fixable over time, because I don’t want to force leo, if he naturall Can’t.
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Your German Shepherd looks like a Show Line dog and their natural energy level is often different than a working line dog. If he is CONFIDENT when you do take him out around your then his temperament is likely adequate. At 6 mnonths old he won't be up for running with you and would not be ready to start that until at least 14 months old.

You have not detailed what you are feeding him or what his weight is at 6 months old. At this age their bones are still growing and they are teething (or just finished teething). Calcium supplementation is always dependent on what the dog is eating and MUST be balanced with phosphous. This is why commercial raw dog mixes include ground bone.. bone should have the correct Ca/P ratio. Supplementing with Vitamin D only can be tricky and can be toxic.. so be careful of that.

What you describe COULD be a relationship issue and the dog being unsure what you want. It could just as easily be a dietary issue OR even a more serious medical issue such as heart problems or even joint issues such as panosteitis which is an inflamation of the growth plates in the bones (also called growing pains) or dysoplastic hips.

Last, and not least, it could be temperament and LACK of confidence and the dog's default is to lie down. Some dogs will do this if you are not very clear and/or engaging.

If I were you I would be back at the vet and asking more questions. I would be considering a canine cardiologist work up to make sure your puppy does not have heart issues and I would look at his nutrition with someone who specializes in that aspect. I would also be talking to your breeder.
 

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I agree that going back to the vet - or getting a second opinion from a different vet or specialist - is a good idea if what the first vet suggested isn't changing anything. I'd expect even a show line German Shepherd to be playful as a puppy, and if he were mine I'd be looking for a more thorough check for problems like the ones 3GSD described. Talk to the breeder as well to see if this is how their puppies typically behave, because that will give you a better idea of how normal or abnormal this is.
 
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