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I just bought a prong collar a couple days ago. I fit it to his neck then tried it out today. When we were walking he pulled on it one time and he yelped. I bought a Herm Sprenger from Amazon. He is a blue heeler mix and I bought a 20 inch collar then took a couple prongs off so now it fits not too tight or too loose. But I don’t know why he yelps.
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Prong Collar = Pinch Collar

He is yelping because it is pinching him, as it’s designed to do.

I use one for my Dogo Argentino, so no judgement here, but never thought about using it for either of my other dogs, as they are easily controlled via harnesses
 

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Because it hurts. I'd strongly suggest you ditch the prong & teach him to walk politely on just a flat collar or a harness that won't cause him pain during the learning process (I assume you're using it because he was pulling?) If you describe your problem/s, I'm sure someone will be able to chime in with some tips & training suggestions...
 

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Yes, prong collars work to reduce pulling and correct behavior by being uncomfortable, even painful for some dogs. While some dogs can tolerate this kind of tool fine, others may find it distressing and even start associating the pinch with their surroundings, aggravating or causing fear and reactivity issues. Eg. the dog sees another dog down the street, pulls, feels the pinch, and now believes that other dogs cause the pinching, rather than their pulling.

Some members with more prong experience may be able to speak to things like proper fit, but I'd be very wary about using a prong collar on a dog that finds it so painful they yelp when it's used. There could be a lot of behavioral fallout by using that level of pain in everyday walking or training scenarios.
 

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I just bought a prong collar a couple days ago. I fit it to his neck then tried it out today. When we were walking he pulled on it one time and he yelped. I bought a Herm Sprenger from Amazon. He is a blue heeler mix and I bought a 20 inch collar then took a couple prongs off so now it fits not too tight or too loose. But I don’t know why he yelps. View attachment 264062 View attachment 264063
Well, he does have metal poking into his sensitive neck area any time he pulls, I'd probably yelp if someone did that to me. Your dog would probably do better on a front clip harness. They still help a bit with pulling (though not a substitute for training, of course) and are safer for dogs with sensitive necks.
 
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It's pretty clear that your do does not respond well to a prong. I would find another tool and/or method to use. In general, if you are going to use a prong, you use it, and then take it off when you're done. You don't keep a prong on a dog all the time.
 

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try joining "prong collar advice and training" on Facebook, nobody is going to help you here.

It may be a training issue on your end (throwing it on and expecting your dog to be fine).. or its much too aversive (your dog is too soft for the tool), and its best you find a different tool to train your dog. A front clip, a head harness, a martingale, etc.
 

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try joining "prong collar advice and training" on Facebook, nobody is going to help you here.

It may be a training issue on your end (throwing it on and expecting your dog to be fine).. or its much too aversive (your dog is too soft for the tool), and its best you find a different tool to train your dog. A front clip, a head harness, a martingale, etc.
Au contraire. I think, for the most part, people on this forum are very helpful. It's just that the 'help' generally doesn't include advice on how to use a pain-inducing tool "properly", but on how to utilize more humane (and in the long run, more effective) training methods.
 

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Your dog is speaking to you.

He is saying emphatically "please, don't do that".


Honestly though, I find it difficult to comprehend that some people are so detached they even find it necessary to ask this question. And if, on the other hand, it's due to an extreme level of inexperience while handling dogs... well, in that case ... therein lies your answer.
 

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A prong collar is a corrective device. When used as you are using it, the dog bangs the end of the leash and it hurts. A LOT of people use it this way to reduce pulling. I get a lot of flack for saying this, but the prong collar is designed not to be used with a steady pull as much as it is to be used with a sharp tug. The dog will eventually become habituated to a steady pull but the sharp tug which needs to be "enough but not too much" is not a thing dogs typically become habituated too unless the sharp tug is done very lightly.. at which point the correction is ineffectual. I do use a prong collar at times but not for pulling.

Back to your dog. IF your dog is a puller, there are a lot of things to work on first before resorting to a prong collar.

While the prong collar works, it must be worn every walk because it only teaches the dog not to pull when the collar is on. It does not teach the dog not to pull.

There are many ways to work on not pulling. The first thing you need to do is to teach the dog to pay attention to you. Focus on you when you ask for it and release to the environment when you give the release word will go a LONG way toward training your dog in everything, including polite on leash walking. If you ask for focus the dog should look at you and move closer to you (putting slack in the leash). There is a whole realm of training you can do once you have focus and that discussion should be another entire thread.

Just know this: A dog that is paying attention to the handler is not pulling the leash, reacting to other dogs, trying to chase people or jump on them and that focused dog is ready to do whatever your next command cue is. Get that focus and everything else become a lot easier.
 

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Maybe I'm the only one, but I can't help but wonder if the OP isn't pulling the Forum's collective leg. It doesn't seem possible to me that anyone can look at a prong collar and wonder why a dog would yelp when pulling on it. If that was an honest question, I'd suggest the OP put the prong collar around his/her own neck, have someone hold the leash, and pull with the same vigor as the dog.
 

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If you feel that your dog can't thrive with positive approaches, that's fine. I think @Deacon.dog mentioned this. But if you have properly introduced it, and are using it properly, and he still yelps, it is not the right tool for your dog. While I would still encourage you to use an approach that doesn't involve any kind of tool (even a fluffy little gentle "positive tool"), if that hasn't worked- you know your dog- you should probably look into a different tool. A martingale, a front-clip harness, something like, that maybe even a head collar (though those are very difficult to use safely). Just steer clear of choke-chains, they can be dangerous, even fatal.
 
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I hope you are also aware of the more subtle signs of dog stress as well. Almost all dogs I've seen on a prong have displayed at least one of these signs: Signs Your Dog is Stressed and How to Relieve It. You shouldn't have to wait until your dog yelps to know if he is stressed or in pain.
 
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I'd suggest the OP put the prong collar around his/her own neck, have someone hold the leash, and pull with the same vigor as the dog.

I've yanked myself on the prong, my sisters arms and their necks, etc. It doesn't hurt, just mild discomfort. The same mild discomfort a dog recieves when they pull on say.. a no pull harness. Plus, you can skim through Punkassdogtrainer on tic tok, he's posted several videos of himself wearing a prong (halarious videos, btw).

I don't know why a honest question to you is a "hoax".. is it because it doesn't line up with your morals? If this was a hoax, why aren't they entertaining with follow up posts? mhm..
 

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A dog's skin is more sensitive then a human’s.
 

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I don't know why a honest question to you is a "hoax".. is it because it doesn't line up with your morals? If this was a hoax, why aren't they entertaining with follow up posts? mhm..
My morals have nothing to do with it. You're too sensitive on this subject, although I've seen you ganged up on over it and understand the reason for that sensitivity. I've used a prong in the past and will again if I need to. My suspicion is simply because I can't imagine how anyone can look at a prong, think about what happens when a dog pulls, and not understand why one would yelp.

I will say, unlike you, I believe a prong is more than mildly uncomfortable when it engages and know it can damn well hurt if a dog hits it hard - you know, like when pulling - or if the person jerks - and I also doubt whatever test you did on yourself consisted of pulling as hard as a dog does. For Pete's sake, unless we're talking miniature somethings, which from the pictures we aren't, I have necklaces that would hurt if I pulled against them as hard as dogs not leash trained pull.

Notice this post - which you liked - from another person who uses a prong but doesn't pretend it's other than it is:
A prong collar is a corrective device. When used as you are using it, the dog bangs the end of the leash and it hurts.
 

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I meant to add, it does hurt of course when the dog hits the end of the lead, but mild corrections don't hurt. I should have been more specific.
 

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I meant to add, it does hurt of course when the dog hits the end of the lead, but mild corrections don't hurt. I should have been more specific.
OK, but here's the thing - Once a dog has received a painful 'correction' on the prong, whether he hit the end on his own, or because the handler yanked on it, he knows how painful the device can be. So, when it's on (even if you're only giving tiny, little 'tugs' or whatever) there is always the threat of real pain hanging over his head. THAT is the reason he complies when you give that little, non-painful "communication" to him - he knows what's coming if he doesn't.

It could be compared to a parent who disciplines his children by hitting them with a belt when they don't do what they're told. The next time all he has to do is remove his belt, or hold up a belt to get compliance, right? Because you know what's coming if you don't. But just because you didn't actually get hit the second time (thus no actual pain) it's that fear of pain, the threat of pain, that gets you moving. Not very nice, right? Not an appropriate way to parent, right?

So why would anyone think this is an appropriate way to train a dog?
 

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If you feel that your dog can't thrive with positive approaches, that's fine. I think @Deacon.dog mentioned this. But if you have properly introduced it, and are using it properly, and he still yelps, it is not the right tool for your dog. While I would still encourage you to use an approach that doesn't involve any kind of tool (even a fluffy little gentle "positive tool"), if that hasn't worked- you know your dog- you should probably look into a different tool. A martingale, a front-clip harness, something like, that maybe even a head collar (though those are very difficult to use safely). Just steer clear of choke-chains, they can be dangerous, even fatal.
If the dog yelps it is not necessarily the wrong tool for the dog. It is the wrong amount of correction. It is too much correction. A correction should be like a tap.. and enough of a tap to get attention (depending on drive level and sensitivity of the dog). As drive goes up sensitivity goes down.

A prong collar is not my first "go to" tool and is not always a tool that needs to be used.

I am entirely against any front clip harness. It actually can really hurt a dog in ways that are not readily apparent. It is an aversive tool as are head halters. Both can do more damage to the dog than a prong collar. Front clip harnesses and head halters tell me the owner either does not know how to train the dog or is too lazy to train the dog.

I hope you are also aware of the more subtle signs of dog stress as well. Almost all dogs I've seen on a prong have displayed at least one of these signs: Signs Your Dog is Stressed and How to Relieve It. You shouldn't have to wait until your dog yelps to know if he is stressed or in pain.
I have used a prong collar in all three phases (Tracking, obedience and protection). A dog in drive does not display stress. The correction must be FAIR and sufficient, but not too much. A dog NOT in drive will exhibit stress signs if the dog has been unfairly corrected and is not in drive. A flat collar can cause a dog to exhibit stress as can a harness or any tool used incorrectly or unfairly.

I have also seen a prong collar used to INCREASE drive when done correctly.

This discussion should be moved to another thread. It should not move to the level of argument IF someone is brave enough to initiate the discussion.

OK, but here's the thing - Once a dog has received a painful 'correction' on the prong, whether he hit the end on his own, or because the handler yanked on it, he knows how painful the device can be. So, when it's on (even if you're only giving tiny, little 'tugs' or whatever) there is always the threat of real pain hanging over his head. THAT is the reason he complies when you give that little, non-painful "communication" to him - he knows what's coming if he doesn't.

It could be compared to a parent who disciplines his children by hitting them with a belt when they don't do what they're told. The next time all he has to do is remove his belt, or hold up a belt to get compliance, right? Because you know what's coming if you don't. But just because you didn't actually get hit the second time (thus no actual pain) it's that fear of pain, the threat of pain, that gets you moving. Not very nice, right? Not an appropriate way to parent, right?

So why would anyone think this is an appropriate way to train a dog?
I agree. A dog KNOWS when that prong collar is on and will certainly behave accordingly but not necessarily show outward stress. If used correctly (and therein lies the rub) the dog will most often simply seem to say, "I best do what is asked." If that correct behavior is repeated (even without corrections) and is appropriately rewarded the Prong can often be faded as you build muscle memory with repetition of the correct behavior and rewards for the correct behavior.
I am not a fan of the prong collar is many situations simply because the correction, (which is NOT a pull but a quick snap of a loose leash and then a return to a loose leash) is personal. In SOME dogs it needs to be personal (again, think dog in DRIVE) and they really respect that. A dog in high drive has much less impulse control. Some dogs do not want to disappoint their handler. Others.. not so much. I have seen a dog work right through an e collar as if it was not even there and then really pay attention to a prong correction NOT because one is more or less of a correction but because one is impersonal and the other is not.

I will add that I know you personally are against any form of corrective device. This is a discussion of the device and its use and what experiences I have had and not whether you or anyone should use corrective devices.
 

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It's interesting to me that a simple (probably naïve) question: "Why does my dog yelp when he pulls on the prong collar?" requires so much vitriol, debate and even speculation about the OP's motives in posting. The question can be (and was) answered with three words.

Let's assume that Lexibenton's question was an honest one because speculation to the contrary is to be left to the moderators. (We could use another moderator, if you think that would be fun.) I wonder how many new members with simple questions have been frightened off when their thread goes completely off the rails.

I remember the good old days when it took a mention of Cesar Millan to create so much controversy.
 
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