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I was reading that you're supposed to walk your dog 1.5 hours a day, regardless of weather and such. I'm just curious as to why this is necessary?

I usually do 4x 15 minute walks a day with a few change ups here and there, anywhere from 1 hour to 3 hours/day.

Is it just to keep them tired out or something? Mental stimulation (why does this matter?)
 

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Well, have you ever exercised? I mean yourself that is, not your dog. After you did it, did you notice any special feeling? Sort of like lower stress, relaxation, etc?

Have you ever exercised a bunch of days in a row? Did you notice any special feeling, sort of like feeling stronger, more energetic maybe healthier?

Multiply that all by 10 and that's what it means to a dog. Dogs descend from wolves who don't work 9-5 doing telemarketing, they move around a lot from place to place, looking for food and stuff like that.
 

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Depending on breed, and age of dog. it would depend on how much excersise they need. some dogs, like mine, a 15 min leash walks 4 times a day would be a waste of time for us. He needs running and swimming to tire him out.

mental stimulation works to keep a dog happy. dogs were bred to work, and do different types of jobs. not just sit around and be pretty (well some WERE bred to be lap dogs)

Dogs who lack excersise, mental stimulation, and guidance become destructive, annoying, ill mannered and can lead to agression to other dogs, humans or both.
 

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what if i go biking for like 15 minutes and do like 2 miles in that time frame?

is it based on distance, time/intensity or what?

i.e. 1 hour of walking for about 6 miles or 30 minute intense 6 miles?
 

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Well, to answer your question, try withholding walks for a few days on end. Then you'll probably see why dogs need good long walks every day. You might have to buy a new couch though.

Seriously, though: dogs need to get out of the house to burn both physical and mental energy. Physical energy is the energy you burn when you go for a jog, or go to the gym. Even if you don't actively exercise, it's the energy you burn when you take the train to work. Energy that your dog can't burn if he spends the whole day indoors sleeping.

Then your dog needs to burn mental energy. This is the energy you burn while working in the office or even while going to the mall or watching a movie. It's what keeps you from being bored. He needs to take in new sights, sounds and smells, meet new people and new dogs, so he doesn't go stir-crazy at home looking at the same four walls.

Time, distance and intensity are all variables that affect the amount of energy burned... and the amount of energy your dog has to burn is dependent on his breed, his size, his age and of course his individual character.
 

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Dogs are born to run....well, actually trot.....over very long distances all day long. A sled dog team will average 100 miles a day....while pulling a sled. Granted, they're conditioned for that level of physically demanding work. The general guidelines for exercise are based on the energy level of the dog, ie; high energy dogs 'need' 12-15 miles of running/trotting/walking a day; medium energy dogs 6-10 miles and low energy dogs 1-5 miles.

Mental exercise (tricks, training, problem solving) can be just as tiring as physical activity. Dogs need both so, many folks alternate the daily activities/routines.
 

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Many of the more difficult dog behaviours to deal with nowadays can be directly related to lack of exercise/stimulation for the dog. We live in a technological society now and the days of inactivity that WE are used to means the dogs do not get the same exercise they did before we became sedentary.

Walking your dog is not JUST about exercise but also a chance for your dog to be stimulated and use his inborn senses and working characteristics to be mentally and physically healthy.

Running your dog on your bike is a good form of aerobic exercise, especially if you have a high energy breed, but still does not take into account his need for FREE running, scenting, play and other forms of stimulation. It's about balance.

Exercise releases endorphins in the brain and this stimulates serotonin as well, calming the dog in general.

There ARE people out there who's dogs only get out to do their "business"...and those dogs are, IMO, neglected. These are the dogs that experience excessive anxiety, destructive behaviours and an inability to learn in training.

Regular exercise is important for BOTH the human and the dog.
 

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Many of the more difficult dog behaviours to deal with nowadays can be directly related to lack of exercise/stimulation for the dog. We live in a technological society now and the days of inactivity that WE are used to means the dogs do not get the same exercise they did before we became sedentary.

Walking your dog is not JUST about exercise but also a chance for your dog to be stimulated and use his inborn senses and working characteristics to be mentally and physically healthy.

Running your dog on your bike is a good form of aerobic exercise, especially if you have a high energy breed, but still does not take into account his need for FREE running, scenting, play and other forms of stimulation. It's about balance.

Exercise releases endorphins in the brain and this stimulates serotonin as well, calming the dog in general.

There ARE people out there who's dogs only get out to do their "business"...and those dogs are, IMO, neglected. These are the dogs that experience excessive anxiety, destructive behaviours and an inability to learn in training.

Regular exercise is important for BOTH the human and the dog.
i never thought about why my grandma's weiner dog was so unwilling to learn and listen. now i know! she only let's her out to go potty. sometimes if the weather is nice she will tie her up out back but she doesn't have tons of room to run or walk around. she just lays there. when i watched her we went for a long walk down a path by a pond and she LOVED it. she came home, drank water, and fell asleep. lol.

my question:

how old must you wait before you can take them on walks? my dog is 3/4 cocker spaniel and 1/4 lab. she is too young to be walked now but is the rule of thumb that after she has all her vaccinations she can start walking? and how can i play with her outside without walking that will tire her enough to sleep well that night?
 

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A client of mine has a separate room in their house for their dog... In the center of a room is a treadmill... lol! You see where I'm going with this don'tcha'?? lol! Whenever the dog starts acting hyperactive, they put him on the treadmill and run him for 15-20. (Not run him into the ground, but he alternates from running, to trotting, to walking, then back up again...)

It's not a great alternative, but both of that dog's owners are too lazy to walk with their dog, lol! But it does seem to work for a bit, like I said- It's not a recommendation, and it's not a great alternative either...
 

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my question:
how old must you wait before you can take them on walks? my dog is 3/4 cocker spaniel and 1/4 lab. she is too young to be walked now but is the rule of thumb that after she has all her vaccinations she can start walking? and how can i play with her outside without walking that will tire her enough to sleep well that night?
I'm going to copy and paste the answer to this (as related to a housebreaking thread post I literally typed a minute or two ago...) and then add some points particular to your question.

About going outside:

Take him outside. Find a spot outside and use it. By being fearful of exposing him to disease before he has had all his shots not only are setting his housebreaking back big time but you are also losing out on his socialization window. A puppies most important socialization happens during 7-14 weeks. Anything he has not been positively exposed to during this period can become a long term fear. Years ago vets told people not to risk it but then realized that the long term effects of improper (or lack of ) socialization in puppies had greater adverse effects (behaviourally and physically) long term than the small risk of infection.
Don't go to areas where a lot of dogs congregate (like dog parks) and avoid feces if it is on the area you are in. But you NEED, in fact it is IMPERATIVE, that you introduce your puppy to the world. People of all shapes sizes and descriptions (in hats, tall, short, all races, wearing sunglasses, with umbrellas, with beards, with crutches, wheelchairs, children, cars, sounds, statues, concrete, grass, sidewalk grates, sounds etc etc etc). Service dogs start their socialization with the world as young as 8 weeks and prior to that are exposed to heat, cold, being tipped head down, being touched, different smells and different noises, substrates etc. This is what helps make them "bombproof" as trainees and adults.
Check out the other housetraining threads for the exact ways to teach your puppy to go outside and to reward.
__________________

In addition to the info above...any sort of stimulation (exposure to new things) regardless of the amount of ACTUAL physical exercise given will help to tire the pup. Dogs need both physical and mental stimulation. Short (less than five minutes) clicker training sessions several times a day helps as well. It is never to early to work on training, only too early for Expectations as to how well your pup will do..lol.
 

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I'll admit that Donatello doesn't really get the amount of physical activity he should get... He "appears" fine with it of course, he's a lazy-bum like me! : P

When I can I either take him to the dog park for a couple hours, or the last couple weeks I've taken him over to my father's house where he romps with three other dogs who are healthy as horses!

I don't take him for long walks for several reasons; 1) Being that there are hundreds of dogs here at my apartment complex, Donatello has already gotten worms twice, and is now on preventative treatment until farther notice. 2) There are many many dogs that get loose, or are strays, that find their way here into my complex; They look disoreinted, frightened and stressed; Donatello is a little pea-brain compared to these dogs and I'm terrified of having to break up a dog fight between a cocky-s*** and a crazed Pit-Bull. 3) It's not safe to wander around my apartment complex; There are shoot-outs, which have decreased since an officer has moved in, but there have been stabbings, shoot-outs, and weird creepy people offering my sisters "rides".

Now, I'm sure many of you will think those are just excuses, but c'mon, I'm not going to risk my life and my dog's life, risk the chance he could be infected by a stray cat that charges him...

There are other things you can do... I do them. I take him to a dog park, where I'm hoping it'll be a *little* cleaner than my complex, and where it's 100% safer than my complex... I make Donatello go through his list of tricks two, three times a day... I try to compensate for the list of excuses I've made above.
 

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I'm going to copy and paste the answer to this (as related to a housebreaking thread post I literally typed a minute or two ago...) and then add some points particular to your question.

About going outside:

Take him outside. Find a spot outside and use it. By being fearful of exposing him to disease before he has had all his shots not only are setting his housebreaking back big time but you are also losing out on his socialization window. A puppies most important socialization happens during 7-14 weeks. Anything he has not been positively exposed to during this period can become a long term fear. Years ago vets told people not to risk it but then realized that the long term effects of improper (or lack of ) socialization in puppies had greater adverse effects (behaviourally and physically) long term than the small risk of infection.
Don't go to areas where a lot of dogs congregate (like dog parks) and avoid feces if it is on the area you are in. But you NEED, in fact it is IMPERATIVE, that you introduce your puppy to the world. People of all shapes sizes and descriptions (in hats, tall, short, all races, wearing sunglasses, with umbrellas, with beards, with crutches, wheelchairs, children, cars, sounds, statues, concrete, grass, sidewalk grates, sounds etc etc etc). Service dogs start their socialization with the world as young as 8 weeks and prior to that are exposed to heat, cold, being tipped head down, being touched, different smells and different noises, substrates etc. This is what helps make them "bombproof" as trainees and adults.
Check out the other housetraining threads for the exact ways to teach your puppy to go outside and to reward.
__________________

In addition to the info above...any sort of stimulation (exposure to new things) regardless of the amount of ACTUAL physical exercise given will help to tire the pup. Dogs need both physical and mental stimulation. Short (less than five minutes) clicker training sessions several times a day helps as well. It is never to early to work on training, only too early for Expectations as to how well your pup will do..lol.
Thank you so much for your help! I agree that people focus too much on the fact that outside can be dangerous for a pup to get disease, but literally we just play in our backyard and although our neighbor has a big dog, it doesn't go out back. It goes out front. She likes laying in the grass and chasing leaves. lol. AND chasing me of course. I think the problem is that she doesn't sleep well at night yet so my BF is up with her half the night and then during the day they both want to sleep. And all the while I'm at work and I'm not able to play with her until I get home. And then she's tuckered out by 7-8 and then wants to be up at 9-10 when it's bedtime! GRR! I know it's hard for the BF but I think he needs to grin and bear it a few days and play with her a lot instead of napping.

(She's only 5 1/2 weeks old. It's a long story but it was either she was going to be taken to the pound (not by us) or we had to take her early.)

P.S.-If I had known you had just posted that somewhere else I wouldn't have asked here. lol. :p

I'll admit that Donatello doesn't really get the amount of physical activity he should get... He "appears" fine with it of course, he's a lazy-bum like me! : P

When I can I either take him to the dog park for a couple hours, or the last couple weeks I've taken him over to my father's house where he romps with three other dogs who are healthy as horses!

I don't take him for long walks for several reasons; 1) Being that there are hundreds of dogs here at my apartment complex, Donatello has already gotten worms twice, and is now on preventative treatment until farther notice. 2) There are many many dogs that get loose, or are strays, that find their way here into my complex; They look disoreinted, frightened and stressed; Donatello is a little pea-brain compared to these dogs and I'm terrified of having to break up a dog fight between a cocky-s*** and a crazed Pit-Bull. 3) It's not safe to wander around my apartment complex; There are shoot-outs, which have decreased since an officer has moved in, but there have been stabbings, shoot-outs, and weird creepy people offering my sisters "rides".

Now, I'm sure many of you will think those are just excuses, but c'mon, I'm not going to risk my life and my dog's life, risk the chance he could be infected by a stray cat that charges him...

There are other things you can do... I do them. I take him to a dog park, where I'm hoping it'll be a *little* cleaner than my complex, and where it's 100% safer than my complex... I make Donatello go through his list of tricks two, three times a day... I try to compensate for the list of excuses I've made above.
I don't think it sounds like you're making excuses. It sounds like you are playing it safe and still going out of your way to entertain him and keep him happy and healthy.

Glad that cop moved in! Phew. :)
 

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I don't think it sounds like you're making excuses. It sounds like you are playing it safe and still going out of your way to entertain him and keep him happy and healthy.

Glad that cop moved in! Phew. :)
Thanks, lol! I'm glad he moved in too!

I'm not going to risk my life and his just to make sure he gets his daily exercise in, lol! Sorry, not gonna happen! He's had no complaints thus-far either, so I must be doing something right!
 

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Think of it this way: imagine you were kept in a locked room 24 hours a day, with no books, TV, music, or internet, and had to interact with the same annoying people every day. Not fun, eh?

Now imagine you were, say, a Labrador Retriever. Your body was designed to dive into the icy Newfoundland waters, swim a hundred yards, grab a downed duck, swim back - then do it again. Your brain was bred to meet & love any and every person & dog in the whole world. Every fiber of your being is screaming to get out there and do something, meet someone. Instead you're stuck in the same house, the same yard, all day, every day. How sane do you think you would be?

Most dogs are descendants of working breeds, and carry a lot of the same needs & behaviors. Honestly, I wonder if the hours of walk, play, & training I do are enough for my dog to be truly happy, as opposed to merely not-insane from boredom.
 

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I was reading that you're supposed to walk your dog 1.5 hours a day, regardless of weather and such. I'm just curious as to why this is necessary?

I usually do 4x 15 minute walks a day with a few change ups here and there, anywhere from 1 hour to 3 hours/day.

Is it just to keep them tired out or something? Mental stimulation (why does this matter?)
1 1/2 hours a day? That's it?

Well, Wally's about done for the day then - just got back in from a 60 minute walk as well as some clicker training and some sniff-around time.

He's currently knocked out dead-dog sleep.

Wally gets about 3 hours of walks every day, sometimes 4 hours, depending on weather, etc, and 30 minutes of training/mental exercises every day. He probably could go longer (he doesn't show he's tired very often unless I've totally wiped him out), but when done - he drinks some water and hits the sack.

Works really well to keep him sleep all night. It's about the only time, sans an occasional nap, he gets any major sleep. Rest of the time he's walking, playing, training, or just following me around like a stalker.

It also helps with the socialization, even in an "older" dog. Wally missed that 'socialization window' by a mile, but he's still socializing to things and gotten FAR better (makes me doubt the 'window' theory but instead think socialization is a constant, ever-changing, process), a lot of that, imo, is him being out in the world 20+ hours a week.
 

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I was reading that you're supposed to walk your dog 1.5 hours a day, regardless of weather and such. I'm just curious as to why this is necessary?
I believe it comes from the tired old story that dogs descended from wolves, and the generalization that wolves travel large distances to survive...except that's not the whole story, and completely inaccurate if resources are plentiful. This is even more of an exception for feral dogs. They, being mostly scavengers, take from a location and invest most of their energy into hazard avoidance, not traveling. Don't get me wrong, exercise is great, but in moderation. What I believe to be more important than exercise is enrichment...the dog using his mental faculties in new, controlled, and dog-ed ways.
 

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Why get a dog if you do not want or do not care about the dog's needs? They NEED exercise! (How much depends of course on the breed .)
As a dog owner you have a responsibility to ensure that your dog feels as good as possible, ensure that it receives a rich life, by going walking at least 3-5 days a week, and make sure that the dog will be activated mentally every now and then. If you think that just being out in the garden all day long is enough for a dog, maybe you should get a teddy bear instead, they requires nothing ;):D
 

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My dogs get walked for 20-30 minutes a day or every other day. Sometimes they get walked an hour. It all depends on what I have time for. If I walked my dogs for 3-4 hours a day I would have no time to do anything else. If I got up early and walked the dog for an hour I would still get home at 5:30 and end up walking the dogs until 8:30 and then I'd only have a few hours to keep up with housework, errands and all the normal stuff to keep the house running. My dogs do fine with the walks I give them.
 

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I think it depends on the breed, the neighborhood, the dogs personality, and their health. To say that all dogs need to be walked 1.5 miles a day is too general I think.
 

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As your German Shepherd paces back and forth and around over there and back again.. wearing a path in the rug, poking the cats with her nose and annoying you because it has been pouring rain for 4 days straight... and you HAVE walked but only 2 miles each day.. and you HAVE clicker trained for 2 half hour sessions...

..that is when you will know why you need to walk your dog so long.

Hulk is right.. you might never have time for a lot of other things.. :p
 
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