Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am looking for a pure bred pug as a pet. The local shelters only have older pugs. The shelters in other states that have baby pugs charge $400 for them. The price and the travel distance make adopting a rescued pug not an option for me. I suppose the shelters, like pet shops, charge what the market will bare. I'll probably buy a pure bred pug from a local breeder and pay $1000. I never thought I'd spend that much for a pet dog (never owned a pet), but I guess I'll be living with my pug for the next ten years or so; I guess it's a good investment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,131 Posts
Pugs are ripe with health problems so just make sure you get one from someone who does health checks on their dogs. Otherwise you'll be forking out even more money later on for vet bills.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,773 Posts
pug puppies are harder to find in rescue .....because they are so cute and they are a small popular breed...they often don't go to the shelter till ether the owner gets over the cute factor or wont deal with the dogs health problems :(

If you go to a breeder please do your research....a higher price tag does not always a good puppy make :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,296 Posts
Puppies are high-maintenance; $400 is not excessive. Most rescues in my area charge $250 - $300 for an adult; puppies typically cost an additional $100 due to the medical expenses and care.

I apologize for intruding, but if this is your first pet, is there a particular reason you want a pug puppy? As Keechak stated, Pugs are especially prone to health problems; a good breeder will improve your odds, but a lot of the problems are inherent to the breed. Their short faces cause breathing and heat dissipation problems (which is usually rare for a small breed). Their large, round eyes make them prone to infections and ocular proptosis (a condition where the eye falls out of the skull due to shallow eye sockets). If you're concerned now with the immediate cost of purchasing one, you should prepare for the possible long-term costs of maintaining one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
691 Posts
I have a pug, and bought her from a very reputable breeder (health tests, shows, etc). She has had persistant nail bed infections her whole life and has had numerous trials of medicines, food elimination, you name it. We can't figure out the cause. Many health issues can come up no matter where you get your dog from. Treating these issues are NOT cheap, so please do tons of research before deciding on this breed.

Pugs in rescue are not cheap because they mostly come from puppymills so they can have numerous health issues that the rescue must treat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,213 Posts
Rescues have a lot of expenses, especially with puppies. that is why they ask for the higher adoption fee in order to help keep the rescue organization running and offset all of the medical fees to raising the puppies.

the thing you should keep in mind is a dog is more expensive than just the initial adoption fee or breeder fee. many dogs require more than just one vet visit a year and treats, toys, food, heartworm/tick prevention, boarding, training all add ton to the cost of dog ownership.
for my two dogs just food and vet bills alone cost me around $3500 a year.

good luck with your search and i hope you find the right dog for you! i think it doesn't matter what breed of dog one chooses to have as long as research and thought is done thoroughly... all dogs have health issues or accidents may happen, just prepare to spend more than you figure it would cost...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,072 Posts
As much as Petfinder is generally a good place to look for a pet, I would be suspicious and ask some serious questions about where any rescue purebred puppies came from. There's some groups on there that are basically brokers for puppy mills - they 'rescue' puppies that didn't sell (with money- I wouldn't call that rescuing) and then 'adopt' them out wiht no vet work for very large adoption fees (I would call that selling). Any group with multiple purebred puppies over an extended period of time that is NOT directly involved in puppy mill seizures (especially if they have more than one breed or more than one litter at a time!) needs to be scrutinized carefully.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,837 Posts
I think $400 for a puppy, pure bred or otherwise, is quite reasonable. Though, I've never flinched at rescue prices at all, even for adult dogs. My mutt was $15 at an animal control, but I drove 9 hours round trip to get her, and her subsequent care was thousands of dollars (not a great example. I knew she would need extensive care when I picked her up) My other two were both adults, one surprisingly came with AKC papers, but they were $250 and fully vaccinated and altered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,773 Posts
Don't get the wrong idea ....pugs are great dogs :)....you just have to be prepared for the worst and hope for the best.

I got my pug for a breeder that I found was very reputable and I have had my girl for 4 years now with no problems at all besides having to get her teeth cleaned by the vet....which sometimes needs to be done with many breeds.....you just need to know what your getting into with a pug and be ready if something were to go wrong.....honestly I think its a good idea for any dog owner to be prepared for an emergency or health issue should it arise:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Responsible breeders spend a LOT of time and money on vet care, genetic/health testing for the parents, training, socialization, diet, and supplies to make sure that they are producing high quality, healthy, happy puppies from exceptionally healthy parents, born and raised in a good home. It costs a lot of money to be a good breeder!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
I would like to add that puppies at rescues are rare. Before I decided on a breeder, the BF and I considered getting a puppy from a rescue. We contacted lots of samoyed rescues to find out what chances we had of getting a purebred sammy puppy.

They said slim to none. Then, I got bitten by the "show" bug, much like my mom did at my age, and decided to go ahead and go with a good breeder and just get a performance dog.

So, that's why they're expensive. Most of the time you'll find adults in rescue. Some will be healthier then others.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top