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Discussion Starter #1
every since I can remember when dogs came into my presence that would put their tail between their legs and start peeing on them selves and cry/whine i guess.

I dont even have to look at the dog, one day i was walking in the park minding my business and i heard a pit bull whinning I looked and saw he was peeing on him self and had his tail down and he stoped and was looking at me the whole time i walked by, his master had to yell at him to get him moving again. this happens to just about any dog and every dog i encounter.

Just recently I began to wonder more about it because I was at 2 of my friend's houses and they both told me the same thing they never seen their dog react that way actually in both cases they attacked me which is very odd especially when I wasn't even looking at the dog.

variables include
1. dogs i know at friends houses.
2. dogs i dont know at new places I visit beit new friends or family, so in this case this is the first time their dog has ever seen me
3. dogs who I pass by in the street. in this case I have never interacted with this dog
4. they all do the same thing, cower/whine/pee/tail down between legs and they always do it in my presence.

side note
if u r going to be a jerk dont bother responding, if u r going to correct my grammer domt boter 2 resp0nD beause i dont care.

if u have a positive thought or have a question about me please do share or ask:)
 

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Dogs are all about body language. Do you carry yourself in an overly assertive manner? Are you big and tall, so that when they look up at you, it's intimidating? Do you stare them in the eyes? Do you move quickly and unpredictably? Next time, try squatting down to the dog's level and not making eye contact. Offer your hand and look away. The dog will probably come sniff your hand, and maybe decide you're not too bad. If you have a treat in that hand, that would work even better. But don't rush it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
i read about the body language thingy in other posts on this site and i am 5,11 i dont look a dog in the eye. in the case i mentioned about the pit bull that dog was over 30 feet away and we were walking parallel in opposite directions tho.. one case wherei was attacked/bitten the dog kept wedging himself between me and my friend barking at first, he ignored all of my friends commands finally he just bit both of my arms and i left. this last weekend i went to my friends house for the first time and we went outback yard i was behind my friend the dog was in the back yard protecting the 2 kids, he immeadiatly ran for me and ignored all of my friends commands to stop and attacked me. I defended my self well and ended up leaving because they couldnt control him. then 3 months ago i was was attacked again in my neighborhood walking, this dog was out with their kids and i had my 2 yr old on my shoulders at the time and defended my self again. I cant have a dog take my down because i had back surgery and cant afford to be knocked to the ground. I repeatedly told kids to controll their dog and they couldnt.

with my friends dog i did try to get down and let them sniff my hand stuff on both occasions prior to the attack. Can dogs sense things from 30 feet away?
 

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They might be sensing your apprehension. If you expect a dog to attack you, they'll pick up on it and become nervous. When you see them get nervous, you also become more alert and tense, and then everything spirals into a negative feedback loop.

If you really want to understand how your actions are perceived by a dog, there's a wonderful book by Patricia McConnell called 'The Other End of the Leash.' It's helped me immeasurably dealing with my own dogs, and helped me to regulate my own body language around them. You can get it for $12 on Amazon, which seems a small price to pay for your future safety.

I can't think of another reason why so many dogs would be scared of you.
 

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It sounds like you had a couple bad experiences with dogs and now generalize that all dogs hate you (which is silly). The pit bull likely had issues and probably does that frequently, I doubt it had anything to do with you specifically. Willowy gave you good advice. I suggest you find someone else who has a dog and practice using the appropriate body language.

Yes a dog can observe from 30 feet away. Like Willowy said they base everything on body language.
 

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My dog reacts to very few people and I have come to believe he can just sense something that reads "wrong" to him. From the end of your post and the bit of a rant about how people are going to attack your grammar, etc, I get the feeling that you may come off as a bit hostile, in a dog's eyes (and from my take on reading your post). Dogs can be way more perceptive than humans! I trust my dog's instincts. You may want to think about if you are walking around expecting trouble. You may not feel it and people may not notice it but, dogs don't miss much.
 

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It's as Willowy says - it's all about body language and facial expression. Dogs evolved primarily based on their ability to read human behavior, so the average dogs sees and interprets even the smallest details which we take for granted. As the owner of a reactive dog, I've become very finely attuned to how people carry themselves, and I'm still only notice a fraction of what the average dog looks for.

First, I'm assuming you're a male - congratulations! While I do find the perks of our club are most enjoyable (quite amusing body noises, hair in fun places, writing your name in the snow), there are, sadly, some drawbacks. Namely, lower life expectancy, and an unfortunate tendency to frighten dogs for seemingly no reason.

There are a lot of theories on this, but the one that seems most plausible to me is the fact that men just look and act differntly from women - and those specific differences tend to be ones that put dogs on the defensive. To quote a blog post that paraphrases an article summarizing journal study:

A recent study reported in Scientific American Mind might have shed some light on this topic. (Actually, I read it and jumped up exclaiming OH WOW and then had to tell Willie that everything was alright.) Research published in Current Biology asked volunteers to guess the direction of motion of figures that were represented only by points of light placed at critical joints. (Similar to the motion capture process used to make movies like Avatar in which a real person moves around with points of light attached to hips, elbows, shoulders, knees etc, and a computer records the movement of the lights.)

When watching the points of light that represented a moving figure, the volunteers said that the figures made by men were approaching, while the figures made by woman were retreating. I haven’t read the study yet, and am a bit confused by the report in Sci Amer that “neutral and masculine gaits” were perceived as coming closer, while “feminine walks” were perceived as moving away. What is a “neutral” walk? Did they not use men and woman walking normally, but asked them to exaggerate how they “thought” men and woman walk?

All this can be answered when we get the study, but assuming the methods were sound, what an interesting piece of information for us. If the critical points of men are seen as coming closer at higher rates or stronger intensity than women, no wonder dogs are more afraid of males than females. Fearful dogs are ALWAYS more afraid of something coming at them than they are at approaching something themselves.
My guess is that two things are happening. First, your own natural movements tend to exaggerate the 'aggressive' interpretation dogs see in us. It's hard to do, but try to examine your own behaviors - when you sit, stand, walk, etc. Try to notice things like your posture, where your shoulders are, whether your muscles tend to be tight or relaxed.

Next, try to feel your facial expressions. A mirror won't work because your expression changes when you're actively looking for something, but a digital camera might. What you're tying to determine is which facial muscles are tensing - specifically the ones around the eyes and the mouth. There is a 'hard' look which some people naturally have, and which my own dog reacts very strongly to.

The other thing is, I'm betting there's a feedback loop going on here. You likely had some bad experiences with dogs early on, and now instinctively tense up around them. Dogs, in turn, will recognize this immediately and react even more - which, in turn, increases you anxiety even more. Since it's awful hard to explain things like this to a dog, you'll have to be the one to take the initiative.

The next time you interact with a friend's dog, do it in a neutral environment, and not their home. Start by having your back turned, either standing or sitting motionless in a relaxed posture. Let the dog approach slowly from behind, and make sure you ignore the dog. It also helps to have treats for the dog to create a positive association with you, but you want to be careful about how you feed the dog - no sudden or aggressive movements, as it'll only set you back even further. ONLY if you're comfortable with it, you can let the dog eat gently out of your hand, being careful not to make eye contact or spook the dog.

The most important thing is to stay relaxed the entire time this happens - chances are, the dog will notice you tensing up even before you do. If you're not calm and relaxed, the situation will only get worse. Go slowly - it's better to not make progress than it is to screw up and have to start over from the beginning. I'm making a point of this because 90% of this is going to be your personal state of mind during interactions - if you honestly don't think you can remain calm, then it'll be better to just avoid the dogs in the first place.
 

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... they all do the same thing, cower/whine/pee/tail down between legs and they always do it in my presence.
Assuming for a moment that you're for real:

It's a very good idea (for you!) to figure out why this is happening.
Whatever "vibes" you're emitting,
or body language you're displaying
would seem to be quite intimidating to insecure dogs.

However, there are many which are not insecure.
There are many dogs which will not be intimidated.
If and when you encounter such a dog,
the result will be quite different!
 

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My dog reacts to very few people and I have come to believe he can just sense something that reads "wrong" to him. From the end of your post and the bit of a rant about how people are going to attack your grammar, etc, I get the feeling that you may come off as a bit hostile, in a dog's eyes (and from my take on reading your post). Dogs can be way more perceptive than humans! I trust my dog's instincts. You may want to think about if you are walking around expecting trouble. You may not feel it and people may not notice it but, dogs don't miss much.
I wasn't going to say anything, but that was my very first thought after reading your post.

They might be sensing your apprehension. If you expect a dog to attack you, they'll pick up on it and become nervous. When you see them get nervous, you also become more alert and tense, and then everything spirals into a negative feedback loop.

If you really want to understand how your actions are perceived by a dog, there's a wonderful book by Patricia McConnell called 'The Other End of the Leash.' It's helped me immeasurably dealing with my own dogs, and helped me to regulate my own body language around them. You can get it for $12 on Amazon, which seems a small price to pay for your future safety.
This is also good advice. Excellent book!

It sounds like you had a couple bad experiences with dogs and now generalize that all dogs hate you (which is silly). The pit bull likely had issues and probably does that frequently, I doubt it had anything to do with you specifically. Willowy gave you good advice. I suggest you find someone else who has a dog and practice using the appropriate body language.

Yes a dog can observe from 30 feet away. Like Willowy said they base everything on body language.
Really get in touch with yourself to see if something inside of YOU can be controlled. Dogs don't base their reactions on "I just don't like you". There is a reason for it. Or maybe it's all just a strange coincidence!?

Hope you get it resolved, though. Maybe one day you'll meet your furry best friend =)
 

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On the opposite side of this, I have seen, with both of the guide pups I've raised, that they can pick a dog-loving person out of a crowd. We can be standing amongst many people and my dog will focus on one person, and get all happy, tail wagging, play posture, etc. I'll look at the person and they'll start a conversation about how much they love dogs. The dog can tell.

This may sound nuts, but do you usually wear a baseball cap? Some dogs are threatened by that.
or sunglasses?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
thanks for everyones responses,

lisak_87 - yes its sad but i want to meet ur dog to :) as long as its in a controlled environment and everything is video tapped so we can figure out whats up. jk

prntmkr - I believe u r right, the next time I am unjustly attacked by a dog that i deem a huge threat and if i am with my children i will not hesitate to use my firearm and call the authorities. As i said had back surgery "artificial disk" and i cant afford to be knocked to the ground and or killed by a dog that his master is unable to control. I mind my business when i go walking with my kids in the neighborhood, i am not looking for trouble


I really like dogs and mean them no harm to them and i want to get one for my 2 kids so they can grow up with one but i have to figure out the problem first i would hate to get a dog and discover is just wouldn't work out.


funny story.. i was lost in the woods when i was 15 and the local sherrif was going to let a German Shepard go loose in the woods to find me, he was given the command to apprehend me and bark, thank goodness it rained and he never picked up on my scent. i have seen videos of what these dogs can do.
 

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thanks for everyones responses,

lisak_87 - yes its sad but i want to meet ur dog to :) as long as its in a controlled environment and everything is video tapped so we can figure out whats up. jk

prntmkr - I believe u r right, the next time I am unjustly attacked by a dog that i deem a huge threat and if i am with my children i will not hesitate to use my firearm and call the authorities. As i said had back surgery "artificial disk" and i cant afford to be knocked to the ground and or killed by a dog that his master is unable to control. I mind my business when i go walking with my kids in the neighborhood, i am not looking for trouble


I really like dogs and mean them no harm to them and i want to get one for my 2 kids so they can grow up with one but i have to figure out the problem first i would hate to get a dog and discover is just wouldn't work out.


funny story.. i was lost in the woods when i was 15 and the local sherrif was going to let a German Shepard go loose in the woods to find me, he was given the command to apprehend me and bark, thank goodness it rained and he never picked up on my scent. i have seen videos of what these dogs can do.
In what state do you live?

I'd be very apprehensive about using a firearm against someone else's dog, especially if it's on a leash, for a few reasons.

First of all, if someone pulled a gun on my dog, I'd shoot them faster than they could think and I'd shoot until they were dead (I carry, too). You may not be the only one with a gun and if you're with your children, do you really want to put them in harm's way? You'd be aiming for the dog and I'd be aiming for you, so you'd be in a very bad situation.

Secondly, there will be a court case against you for animal cruelty and an investigation will take place if you shoot a dog. Your claim will of course be personal defense, or defense of your children, but there will be witnesses who will testify against you because you will be the "bad guy" who shot a dog. You will lose your license to carry your firearm if you live in certain states, and you will be spending time in court and maybe jail. The case will most likely go against you unless the dog has a bite history, in which case you may win.

Instead of immediately resorting to violence, if you see someone with a large and out of control dog, why not just walk the other way? Or, if you really care that much, even though you don't own a dog, you can contact a behaviorist and see if they'll work with YOU and some dogs in order to assess the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
so to illustrate my issue the 5 dog attacks prior to the 3 were up from behind by surprise, i didn't see the dog but it charged at him and started barking, therefore i didn't have the opportunity to avoid him and call animal control this was back between 2005-2007. The owners were no where to be found, the dogs were out loose, no leash

the law would be on my side because I live in arizona
http://www.azleg.gov/ars/13/03107.htm
section 9

9. In self-defense or defense of another person against an animal attack if a reasonable person would believe that deadly physical force against the animal is immediately necessary and reasonable under the circumstances to protect oneself or the other person.


if u were to shoot me and kill me for defending my self because ur dog bit me u would land in jail. I would think twice about discharging a firearm near my kids anyway because they would no doubt go deaf.

if ur dog attacked a cop and he pulled his gun out to take him down would you just shoot a cop with out thinking? You dont know who anyone is on the street.
 

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so to illustrate my issue the 5 dog attacks prior to the 3 were up from behind by surprise, i didn't see the dog but it charged at him and started barking, therefore i didn't have the opportunity to avoid him and call animal control this was back between 2005-2007. The owners

the law would be on my side because I live in arizona
http://www.azleg.gov/ars/13/03107.htm
section 9

9. In self-defense or defense of another person against an animal attack if a reasonable person would believe that deadly physical force against the animal is immediately necessary and reasonable under the circumstances to protect oneself or the other person.


if u were to shoot me and kill me for defending my self because ur dog bit me u would land in jail. I would think twice about discharging a firearm near my kids anyway because they would no doubt go deaf.

if ur dog attacked a cop and he pulled his gun out to take him down would you just shoot a cop with out thinking? You dont know who anyone is on the street.
I really don't want to get into the politics of it, but the argument against you would be that you're a large man and it's a dog, so deadly force wouldn't have been necessary.

If I shot you and killed you, you wouldn't be alive to testify against me. End of story. That's why, in my CPL, CWL and self defense classes, I was always taught to shoot to kill.

Anyways, I don't know why you'd sign onto a dog forum, full of dog lovers, and start here by saying you're going to shoot a dog on the street. Not a good way to start on the right foot.
 

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This guy is my uncle. Sydney is terrified of him and I pretty much just can't bring her to family functions if he's going to be there because she flips out. Idk, do you see any similarity in the way he holds himself to the way you do? He's never done anything to her and actually has never come in close contact with her, but the second he walks into a room she growls and whines and wants to get AWAY. It's very strange. I'd assume if was the mustache except my boyfriend has a big 'ol beard and that doesn't bother her. He's also quite tall.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
dmickle1 -- ur response is quit negative and unlawful i was simply replying to -prntmkr-- where he insinuated I would be in trouble if I were attacked by a deadly large dog not a small puppy. you are just trying to make me look like a dog killer which I'm not I have been unfairly attacked over 20 times in my life and I have NEVER started or stirred the aggressiveness out of a dog, please dont respond to this forum any more if u plan on talking about violence, I would like to learn away from that topic and get back to the science to why dogs react the way they do to me so I can reverse it. please no more gun talk

kafkabeetle -- interestingly I have his facial expressions and build minus the mustash and glasses that look just like ur uncle. ive been told by multple people my whole life that I always look like I am upset and have a grin on my face. not sure why, but this couldnt explain the attacks from behind where the dog hasnt seen my face can it? do you think its the build? in most cases the dogs pee and bark or attack if the master is not around.
 
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