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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Everybody;

Once more I appeal to the knowledge of you canine experts.

I have a Malinois 16 months old.

My objective is to be able to let it free (without a leash) at the beach, etc.

For this I need a solid recall. So far I have trained him for a vocal recall using a long leash. I must say that he is 85% reliable.

My next step is to substitute the vocal recall by a whistle recall.

For this I plan to train him by 1) Whistle command (4 short beeps) followed by the vocal command. Later I will only do the whistle command.

Does this sound right to you. Is there any advice?

Thanks for the feed back
 

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I would switch the order and give the verbal command first, and as he's running back to you give the whistle cue. He will associate the whistle sound with him running back.

I would start at home by pairing the whistle with treats, kind of like you would load a clicker. Just walk around and randomly give your whistle cue, then reward when he looks at you.

What type of whistle are you planning to use? I have a spaniel whistle that many hunters use and I really like it.

If you're interested, you can train other cues to the whistle as well that are useful when your dog is off leash. Most hunters train a sit cue and a wait/stay/whoa cue.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I would switch the order and give the verbal command first, and as he's running back to you give the whistle cue. He will associate the whistle sound with him running back.

I would start at home by pairing the whistle with treats, kind of like you would load a clicker. Just walk around and randomly give your whistle cue, then reward when he looks at you.

What type of whistle are you planning to use? I have a spaniel whistle that many hunters use and I really like it.

If you're interested, you can train other cues to the whistle as well that are useful when your dog is off leash. Most hunters train a sit cue and a wait/stay/whoa cue.
Thank for the answer.

I was not sure about what order to give first, whistle and then verbal or vice versa.

I will use the ACME 210.5
 

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Thank for the answer.

I was not sure about what order to give first, whistle and then verbal or vice versa.

I will use the ACME 210.5
That's the same one I use :)

Yeah, start with the verbal recall first for a bit. If you whistle first and he ignores it (which he will because he doesn't know what it means yet) then he's just learning to ignore it. Once you've been doing verbal first and whistle when he's already coming, then try whistle first and see if he responds.

In the house with low distraction when you're whistling and treating you won't need the verbal recall. He'll probably pick up very quickly that it's paired with food and it's a novel enough sound that he'll be interested in it anyway.
 

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That's the same one I use :)

Yeah, start with the verbal recall first for a bit. If you whistle first and he ignores it (which he will because he doesn't know what it means yet) then he's just learning to ignore it. Once you've been doing verbal first and whistle when he's already coming, then try whistle first and see if he responds.

In the house with low distraction when you're whistling and treating you won't need the verbal recall. He'll probably pick up very quickly that it's paired with food and it's a novel enough sound that he'll be interested in it anyway.
I ll try that. I am eager to be able to let it run widely with a reliable recall.
 

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I haven't used the whistle in a while with Watson but you've inspired me to take it back out. A lot of times we're sloppy with our recall cues (at least I am), where we'll just call the dog's name, or come'ere, or whatever. The whistle is super clear and definite, and I think it breaks into their brain better than our aimless chattering when they're really distracted by something.
 

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I had a lab that was whistle-trained. He could be 100 yards away and we come running the instant he heard the whistle.

When he got older, and his eyesight started to fade (but not his hearing) I would blow the whistle and the wave my arm so he could spot me from a distance.

I can't tell you how I trained him, though. He came to us that way - which I discovered during our first whistle-training session. (Either that, or he was a lot smarter than I gave him credit for.)

The whistle failed exactly once in the ten years we had him. He was rolling in a rotten carp on a river bank and when I blew the whistler, he looked up at me as if to say, "I'll be with you in a minute. I'm almost done here." It was too late, anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I had a lab that was whistle-trained. He could be 100 yards away and we come running the instant he heard the whistle.

When he got older, and his eyesight started to fade (but not his hearing) I would blow the whistle and the wave my arm so he could spot me from a distance.

I can't tell you how I trained him, though. He came to us that way - which I discovered during our first whistle-training session. (Either that, or he was a lot smarter than I gave him credit for.)

The whistle failed exactly once in the ten years we had him. He was rolling in a rotten carp on a river bank and when I blew the whistler, he looked up at me as if to say, "I'll be with you in a minute. I'm almost done here." It was too late, anyway.
Funny story, thanks for sharing.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hello All;

I got in the mail the ACME 210 1/2 that I ordered and today is gonna be my first recall session.

So my dog does already a good vocal recall so now I want to transfer it to a whistle recall.

1) I don´t want to loose the voice recall ability. Can he respond to voice and whistle recall?

2) How short should my training sessions for recall be? I heard somewhere that they should be pretty short...

Thanks
 

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You can certainly use both a verbal and a whistle recall.

Initial training session should be kept short so the dog doesn't get bored or tired. However with recall training, I usually incorporate it into our daily walks or any time we're outdoors (once inside has been mastered).
 

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Discussion Starter #13
You can certainly use both a verbal and a whistle recall.

Initial training session should be kept short so the dog doesn't get bored or tired. However with recall training, I usually incorporate it into our daily walks or any time we're outdoors (once inside has been mastered).
Thanks;

Did my first training and the whistle certainly get his attention. I use boiled chicken pieces as treats and I do 4 recalls. I ll keep it like that for a week or so
 

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Thanks;

Did my first training and the whistle certainly get his attention. I use boiled chicken pieces as treats and I do 4 recalls. I ll keep it like that for a week or so
You can do short sessions like that multiple times per day as well.
 

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Hello All;

I got in the mail the ACME 210 1/2 that I ordered and today is gonna be my first recall session.

So my dog does already a good vocal recall so now I want to transfer it to a whistle recall.

1) I don´t want to loose the voice recall ability. Can he respond to voice and whistle recall?

2) How short should my training sessions for recall be? I heard somewhere that they should be pretty short...

Thanks
My video post didn't get approved, but there is a really good video on youtube I'd like you to watch. Search three point whistle recall.
 

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Agreeing with elrohwen... Teach it from scratch with the whistle as the cue and start in a low distraction area where you know he will come. I would start by just pairing the whistling with high reward treats when he is right in front of me.
I think 80% of good recall training is knowing when not to call your dog. Beyond that, regardless of what cue you pick the methods are the same.
 

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I use my whistle recall a lot nowadays. She comes verbally as well, it's just a lot easier if she gets farther away at the farm, mulling around with the farm dog, to pip the whistle twice and have her appear from wherever rather than calmly-shouting her name haha.

To train it, I used it similarly to when you load a clicker. Started really close to her where she was paying attention, I'd blow the whistles twice and give her high value treats immediately. Then I did it when she wasn't paying attention and across the backyard, blew the whistle she'd come running for treats.
Then I started applying it to off leash at the farm (familiar off leash area, very high value treats) and she'd turn on a dime to come back for treats, then transitioned it to off leash on our trails, and now it's pretty much good to go everywhere, I still always bring treats. I want her to know that coming back to me is ALWAYS a good thing.

Also, a good point from Canyx. When training in the beginning, do not blow the whistle if you think the dog is beyond distracted. You want the dog to come to the whistle every time. Don't blow it, if think you're not going to get the correct response, or the whistle may lose its power. Kind of like if you yell, "Come!" 8 times before the dog actually listens to you, the command loses it's urgency and you may have to call repeatedly before they listen in the future too. I remember when I first started using the whistle off leash at the farm, I timed the recalls just as she was moving on from something she was interested in, so I was almost guaranteed the correct response. Of course there will be times that you time it wrong, but make that as infrequent as you can.
Now I can blow it whenever/wherever and she comes, but when you're training it, you want to set them up for success.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I use my whistle recall a lot nowadays. She comes verbally as well, it's just a lot easier if she gets farther away at the farm, mulling around with the farm dog, to pip the whistle twice and have her appear from wherever rather than calmly-shouting her name haha.

To train it, I used it similarly to when you load a clicker. Started really close to her where she was paying attention, I'd blow the whistles twice and give her high value treats immediately. Then I did it when she wasn't paying attention and across the backyard, blew the whistle she'd come running for treats.
Then I started applying it to off leash at the farm (familiar off leash area, very high value treats) and she'd turn on a dime to come back for treats, then transitioned it to off leash on our trails, and now it's pretty much good to go everywhere, I still always bring treats. I want her to know that coming back to me is ALWAYS a good thing.

Also, a good point from Canyx. When training in the beginning, do not blow the whistle if you think the dog is beyond distracted. You want the dog to come to the whistle every time. Don't blow it, if think you're not going to get the correct response, or the whistle may lose its power. Kind of like if you yell, "Come!" 8 times before the dog actually listens to you, the command loses it's urgency and you may have to call repeatedly before they listen in the future too. I remember when I first started using the whistle off leash at the farm, I timed the recalls just as she was moving on from something she was interested in, so I was almost guaranteed the correct response. Of course there will be times that you time it wrong, but make that as infrequent as you can.
Now I can blow it whenever/wherever and she comes, but when you're training it, you want to set them up for success.
I think I have succeeded in the transition from voice to whistle recall. I used boild chicken as a treat.

I try not to overdo it. So I ll do 3 recalls a day one of which will be the local recall.

When I whistle he runs back to me so fast that he literally bumps into my legs!!!!

Thank you all for your help
 

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I think I have succeeded in the transition from voice to whistle recall. I used boild chicken as a treat.

I try not to overdo it. So I ll do 3 recalls a day one of which will be the local recall.

When I whistle he runs back to me so fast that he literally bumps into my legs!!!!

Thank you all for your help
Of course move at your and his own pace, but you can definitely do it more than three times a day. You can incorporate it into any training you do too!
The point of limiting, that might have been miscommunicated, is to limit the times you do it to times that you know you'll get the correct response. At least in the beginning. Obviously if he's losing interest in training at that time stop for a while, but I'm sure you'll figure it out as you go.

It already sounds like the foundation is coming along lovely! Great job!
 
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