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Hi, I wanna train my dog myself. Kindly help me to choose the best breed that is easy to train.
 

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A lot of breeds can be considered easy to train. I'd start by narrowing down other criteria.

What size fits your preferences and lifestyle? Don't forget to take into account apartment size restrictions if that might be relevant, and remember giant breeds cost more in just about every way. How much coat care are you willing to do? Big difference in managing a smooth-coated breed vs. a fluffy double-coated dog that will shed like crazy vs. a curly-coated breed that will need regular grooming, either at home or professionally. What kind of activities and training are you hoping to do with the dog? That includes what kind of exercise and stimulation they'd get, as different breeds have different energy levels. What kind of temperament would you prefer? Are there any behaviors or traits that are absolute deal-breakers (IE excessive barking, drooling, too big to lift on your own in an emergency, etc.). There's also looks, which is lower priority but still something to consider.

If you give us a few more details about your lifestyle, wants, and needs, we can more easily suggest breeds that would be suitable for your home.
 

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Agree with the above comment - it would be helpful to know more about what you're looking for. What does your lifestyle look like? Any size preference? What kind of training are you hoping to do? And have you ever trained a dog before?
 

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All dogs are trainable. Some just make you work smarter and harder to achieve results.

As mentioned above, a lot more goes into selecting a dog than just getting one of a bred that is "easy to train". The rest of the dog needs to fit your lifestyle, as well. Size, grooming considerations, and energy level are important factors as well. Maybe even more so than being "easy to train".

Also, what kind of training are you wanting to do? Well mannered pet? Competitive obedience? Agility? Bite sports? Scent sports, like tracking or nosework? Working gun dog? Herding?
 

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Hi, I wanna train my dog myself. Kindly help me to choose the best breed that is easy to train.
I would seriously consider obtaining some assistance from a reputable trainer, if possible and if warranted. Sure, dogs can be trained by their owners, exclusively. But guidance from a professional will make the process much easier for you and your dog. That's just my general recommendation.


That said, here is an excerpt (containing a random dog obedience judge's quotation) from Stanley Coren's book, "The Intelligence of Dogs" ...

One judge told me, "A lot has to do with the person training the dog. You can start with a dumb breed and make them really quite clever if you are a good enough trainer". What this judge was actually describing was manifest intelligence -- that is, the sum total of all the dimensions of intelligence that any dog displays.
As noted in bold, a person's training skills are of paramount importance to the relative ease and speed with which training occurs. And thus, success. It really has little if anything to do with the particular breed.
 

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The easily "trainable" dogs will be the breeds with the highest intelligence. Although, these high IQ dogs do tend to have a stubborn streak and are easily bored. They will seek to entertain themselves. These dogs will learn a command in few repetitions. Generally, less than 5 repetitions a Border Collie or Poodle will learn a command

The least "trainable" dogs will be breeds with the lowest intelligence. These dogs will require many sessions to learn a command. Generally, 80-100 repetitions for a Basenji or Afghan Hound to learn a command.

Go onto the internet to search for "dog intelligence". This will produce several sights with lists showing relative intelligence of a dog. Take it with a grain of salt. My MiniS, is typically ranked in the top 15 for intelligent breeds. But I've been working with him for almost 2 years on the "Down" command. He knows the command, but resists executing. Other commands, he has learned in just a few sessions. After he has learned the command, then it is a matter of practice to reinforce the learned command.

Key factors in training is the person doing the training and the energy level of the dog during training.
 

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Some years ago I read The Intelligence of Dogs by Stanley Coren. What I remember is him saying that what we consider intelligence is really trainability. Back then I was heavily involved with horses and didn't really do a lot of training with my dogs, but I do now. A friend who also trains and competes with her dogs refers to it as whether or not the dog is biddable.

So just from what I've seen, there are dogs who are quite smart but not biddable. They can, for instance, figure out how to open doors and do other things that entertain or benefit them, but they aren't keen on doing things they consider stupid just because some human wants them to. I'd put the Akitas I had in that category. I wasn't doing any real training back then, but I still smile remembering the one, who when called from a distance would not just ignore me, but would stop and look back over her shoulder as if to say, "Yeah, I hear you, but I'm not coming, so stop wasting your breath."

Other dogs aren't actually that smart, but they're very biddable. They're easier to live with because they couldn't figure out how to open a door or get into other kinds of trouble to save themselves, but they're quite willing to repeat some obedience command 50 times in a row if it pleases their person and/or results in a food reward.

And of course some dogs are both smart and biddable. But in choosing what's right for you, you also have to consider other traits. For instance, my Rotties are very biddable, but one of them is also very high prey drive (not uncommon in the breed) and very motion reactive, not a good choice for most people as a first dog to train. Some others from highly trainable breeds are so high energy they'd be difficult for a lot of us to live with.

Here in Colorado I'd guess the most numerous breed in the obedience rings is Golden Retriever, but there's also always a good representation of Labs, German Shepherds, Rotties, Aussies, Border Collies, and Shelties. Some Poodles, Corgis, French Bulldogs, Bernese Mountain Dogs, Newfies, German Shepherds. Of the terriers, Border Terriers seem to be the choice of many.

There are always fun and interesting surprises. At the last show I went to, I talked to a girl with a Swedish Danish Farm Dog. I once saw a Miniature Dachshund knock everyone's socks off in Rally.
 

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I kinda agree with storyist above, but I would shorten the list to three breeds, unless you can provide more information about your desires.

1. Golden Retriever - Easy to train, Loves [and needs] to be around people. Learns very quickly.
2. Labrador Retriever - A 3-5yo Lab, especially from a rescue that will try to match your personality may be ideal.
3. German Shepherd - Easy to train, needs lots of socializing. If you don't train him, he will train you!

Other dogs may be easier to train, but may be a challenge for a new owner.
 
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