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I'm looking for some ideas on what kind of dog to get. I live in a house with a small yard. The dog would have to be in the house when I'm not home. I would be away at work for 9.5 hours, 5 days a week and would take the dog for a walk/run before and after work. I'd like one where I can throw the ball/frisbee around.
I'd like the dog to be medium to large size. I've been looking at Australian Shepherds and Border Collies. But they are extremely hyper. Would 2x 1 hour walk/runs a day be enough with my living conditions. Also what about a Chesapeake Bay Retriever?
Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
 

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NOT and Aussie!!

I live with three of them (currently four) and I am Home almost ALL DAY. (I'm a college student off for the summer) and they STILL drive me insane sometimes, I take them usually for 1 or 2 hour long bike rides or walks a day, pluse some ball throwing for about 20 minutes, then another 20 minutes of swimming, and then we have about a half hour training session of eather obedience or agility. EACH DAY! and they still want more.
 

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I wish I could work from home so I could be with my dog all the time. But unfortunately I can't. Do you know of any dogs similar to Australian Shepherds but require less exercise. I'd take it out for at least 2 walk/runs a day, but it sounds like Aussies need much more then I can work into my schedule.
 

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All the herding breeds need baiscally the same amount of excersize so I would stay away from any herding breed.

I don;t feel comfortable telling you whats good for you, but I feel, when it comes to things I have a lot of experiance with, I can tell you what probably isn't good for you.

Sorry I can't be of more help.
 

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If you like the aussie/bc type but want something a little less intense, I would recommend a sheltie. Mine would definitely be good with 30 minutes of walking and some play time in the yard every day. They love to play ball and are easy to train...I also have a bc and an aussie and the shelties are similar in temperament but I'd say they're medium energy instead of high. Of all, my aussie is the most energetic. With all three breeds, you have to be ok with shedding and brushing a couple times a week.
 

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I think you'd do well with a whippet. They're surprisingly good 9 to 5 dogs. Let them have a good run in the morning and they're content to snuggle up and sleep until you get home in the evening.

The fact that they're not prone to many health problems is a great bonus as well.
 

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whippet and sheltie are both great suggestions i think
also american eskimo, puli, lab mix of sorts, fox terrier, poodle, or an airdale will have fun fetching. Actually i think my #1 pick for you would be a standard poodle. smart, low maintenance (if clipped short), clean, love to exercise, and a great athlete.
most of the herding dogs are going to be high maintenance. I have a border collie and until she was about 7 she needed all day work.

9.5 hours a day is not an unreasonable time to leave an adult dog, but you need to find something that's at least a year old.
 

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If you like the aussie/bc type but want something a little less intense, I would recommend a sheltie. Mine would definitely be good with 30 minutes of walking and some play time in the yard every day. They love to play ball and are easy to train...I also have a bc and an aussie and the shelties are similar in temperament but I'd say they're medium energy instead of high. Of all, my aussie is the most energetic. With all three breeds, you have to be ok with shedding and brushing a couple times a week.
Good suggestion. :)

Shelties are fabulous dogs and really an easy fit into a lot of lifestyles. They're mid energy and mine have all been very adaptable to different lifestyles. You can even get one in bi-black and it'll look a lot like a mini border collie. ;)

They shed a lot and bark a lot though.
 

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I agree with those who said a Sheltie would be a good fit with you! My hubby's parents have one and he is the perfect dog for them, and they have a schedule similar to yours. He only gets 1 walk/day though, but he seems fine with that and they play fetch with him a lot too and he loooves it!

I also like Standard Poodles like somebody else mentioned, my friend has one and I just adore it! I think that will be our next dog. She also has a schedule similar to yours, the dog gets walked once/day but she also does agility with her.
 

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whippet and sheltie are both great suggestions i think
also american eskimo
My Eskie hates fetch, but she is very low energy. She's an exception. They're supposed to be much higher energy than Sadie. But I think a couple walk/runs a day would do it for most.

They have a lot of temperament problems if you don't go to a good breeder though. Part of Sadie's problem is socialization, but she also is just SOO scared of everything.


Now. Are you sure that after working 8-9 hours you'll really want to go out for a run and play ball? If when you get home you're full of energy still, than okay, but if you get home now and you just want to watch TV...I'd start running and doing stuff and make sure you'll be ready, BEFORE you get the dog. Also there is day-camp and dog sitters you can use to tire the dog out during the day.

Honestly, I have seen a lot of shelties at work and none of them are like the BCs and Aussies. They're all timid and scared. Maybe just a bad sample. And they're smaller than what you wanted.
 

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Honestly, I have seen a lot of shelties at work and none of them are like the BCs and Aussies. They're all timid and scared. Maybe just a bad sample. And they're smaller than what you wanted.
I've met many Shelties through the Agility club I am a member of, and none of them are timid and scared. Most are extremely outgoing and have the same energy level as most of the BCs and Aussies in the bunch. They range in size from a petite 12 lbs. on up to about 25 lbs. I'd say that as with any dog, what you end up with is mostly in how they are raised.

That said, OP, does the dog you want have to be a purebred? I suggest you check out http://www.petfinder.com often. Also, no matter what breed or mix you decide upon, with your schedule, I would seriously consider getting a trained adult dog. If you are set on a purebred, you can even contact the breed club for rescue information and quality breeders for mature pet prospects.
 

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Honestly, I have seen a lot of shelties at work and none of them are like the BCs and Aussies. They're all timid and scared. Maybe just a bad sample. And they're smaller than what you wanted.
Shelties and other herders are not generally the most stranger-friendly dogs (as in they are not over exuberant like a lab). I think this gets them this reputation of being scared all the time. My sheltie will not greet a stranger, he wants nothing to do with them. He allows other people to pet him, but he doesn't enjoy it. He is not like that at all around his family and he is incredibly affectionate. The proper temperament is aloof with strangers, though many are big time lovebugs and very outgoing. My second sheltie girl was an attention wh*re and wanted everyone to meet her and dote on her. Aussies seem to be similar in that they're either in your face giving kisses or are highly protective and aloof.

I've always loved this saying about shelties. They view you as if you're guilty until you're proven innocent. It takes time to win them over but once you do, you will never have a more loyal friend.

All the herders have a tendency to become neurotic and shy and I often hear this stereotype about shelties. I really don't think I've seen anything worse than a bad bc, though, and on the bc board you see a LOT of people with dogs with temperament/biting problems. Herders (especially bcs)walk a very fine line between a lot of extremes, when something goes out of whack or a behavioral issue is allow to manifest, they can be a real handful.

As far as size goes, the collie family of dogs vary a LOT in size even within breeds. If you're talking show dogs, Aussies will be the biggest, then shelties will be the smallest. If you're talking the overall population, many shelties and border collies are very similar in size. It is not very hard to find a 35+ lb sheltie. I know shelties that are much bigger than some bcs I know. I also know shelties that are just barely over 10 lbs. They vary a lot more than most breeds, even in 'good' breeding programs because of how recently large breeds were added to the gene pool. I know a 19 lb bc and a 45 lb sheltie so you never know. If you want a bigger dog you won't have a problem finding one as they are much more prone to going oversized than undersized. My current dog is 18 lbs, but my other two were 25 lbs, and 35 lbs.
 

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They're both extreme.. but I think as a rule the working lines of any dog vary a lot in size, so that'd explain variation in the BC (though again 19 lbs is pretty freakin' small). And seeing as Shelties are popular targets for BYBs and Pet Stores.. I bet you wouldn't have to look too far to find an oversized one.
 

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Okay, but that's not the sizes they're SUPPOSED to be, right?
No, they're not supposed to be that size. The ideal is in the 20 lb range. However, you can go to a show breeder and find a dog that is 30 lbs easily. The fact that a dog is oversized has nothing to do with how responsible a breeder is in this breed. Appropriate sized dogs throw pups that are well oversized all the time and there is a tendency for dogs to go oversized. This is because collie was crossed into the original shelties (who were much more spitzy in the day) and those collie genes still pop up a lot.

Now, as for bcs, they are bred primarily to work so it doesn't really matter what size they are so long as they get the job done. Typically they seem to be 30-40 lbs but I know a lot that are in the 20-30 range, some even smaller. Since the breeders aren't adhering to a visual breed standard but rather a working one, there is much variation and none of it is considered 'wrong'. One of my friends runs a 16 inch bc in agility, that's smaller than my first sheltie.
 

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Awe, I wanna 16" BC! :)
 

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Might want to look for a border collie or aussie mix, with something like a lab or a golden retriever or some such retriever type.

I've owned one and known 3-4 other different border collie lab mixes and all were great medium sized dogs, all about 35-40lbs, and all were easily exercised with a good game of fetching ball and loved frisbee. None had issues being at home alone while masters worked.

I wouldn't necessarily shy away from a border collie either, if you have a good place to go play fetch where you can toss a frisbee a decent distance and the dog loves to do it you can give one all the exercise they need pretty easily and pretty quickly. Especially if you wear them out twice a day.

I know my BC mix would fetch until she dropped, and it was pretty easy to tire her out every fetching till she had had more than enough. And they typically learn amazingly quickly which can be good or bad depending on what they are learning. The key for me was a large enough open place to let her off leash where I could throw a frisbee or a ball as far as I could. I don't think walks would have done the job.
 

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Awe, I wanna 16" BC! :)
Lol, you and me both! I can't decide if I want another sheltie or a bc or an aussie this time around. I'll probably just find a mix of one of the above that fits my needs best.
 
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