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Interesting indeed.

But brings up a question in my mind....

"Chicken by-products include head, feet, entrails, lungs, spleen, kidneys, brain, liver, stomach, bones, blood, intestines, and any other part of the carcass not fit for human consumption,"

But....if not mistaken, some of these things are actually "good" and desired in raw fed diets (liver/bones/even chicken feet), yes?

So are meat by products really *that bad*--or maybe I'm just totally missing the point.

Or is it the fact that in this article it can be dead/diseased/disabled etc animals that is the real problem? Not so much the products they are as the animals they may be coming from? Is that it?
 

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Or is it the fact that in this article it can be dead/diseased/disabled etc animals that is the real problem? Not so much the products they are as the animals they may be coming from? Is that it? yes that sounds about right euthanized dog yuck
 

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By-products are not as bad as people let on. AAFCO has strict definitions for 'chicken by-products' that are used in dog food. Blood is not included and the intestines are clean. The problem is most dog food companies that use by-products in their dog food are the brands that are chock full of dyes, preservatives, and fillers. However, there are some good dog foods that use by-products.
 

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"Chicken by-products include head, feet, entrails, lungs, spleen, kidneys, brain, liver, stomach, bones, blood, intestines, and any other part of the carcass not fit for human consumption,"

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/012647.html#ixzz1qwmBYEC1
The only bit of the above that my raw fed dog doesn't get is the intestines... so its really not that bad. The offal and bone is where most of the nutrients come from anyhow.

The possible ingredients in meat meal do have me concerned... why would you feed a diseased animal to another animal?
 

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I dont have a problem with feeding clearly labeled byproducts like kidney or liver, but if its something generic like poultry byproduct, you could be getting diseased parts, connective tissue, and other low quality leftovers that have little nutritional value. Also keep in mind that by-products are often denatured, or doused with harsh chemicals like kerosene, fuel oil and detergent to prevent it from getting back into human food chain.
 

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I actually feel guilty for feeding my pets human-food-quality meats. . .they SHOULD eat parts that humans don't want ("by-products"). But, as was said above, the main problem with foods that contain by-products is that they're usually very low-quality, with colors and sugar and weird grain derivatives. The commercial handling of by-products is sketchy at best. So, while I'd feed known by-products to my pets, no problem, I prefer not to buy commercial foods with by-products.
 

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My issue with by-product is that it has little, if any, meat. If there were 2 other meat sources listed before a byproduct I'd be ok with that. And typically, as already mentioned, the foods with byproduct are low-quality foods in general.
 

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It's also wise to avoid unnamed sources. "Meat meal," "bone meal," "animal fat," etc. don't say what animal they are from. That's how you get euthanized pets and roadkill put in.
 

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I dont have a problem with feeding clearly labeled byproducts like kidney or liver, but if its something generic like poultry byproduct, you could be getting diseased parts, connective tissue, and other low quality leftovers that have little nutritional value. Also keep in mind that by-products are often denatured, or doused with harsh chemicals like kerosene, fuel oil and detergent to prevent it from getting back into human food chain.
Keep in mind, the company chooses the quality of their by product meal. A high quality by-product meal can be more nutritious than a low quality chicken meal.
 

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Something that always bothered me about these types of articles. To a wild carnivore including feral dogs, a downer or almost-downer prey animal - be it from disease, old age, accident, or whatever - is a ringing dinner ball. An easy meal So where did the idea originate that food made from such animals is bad for dogs for that reason alone? Considering also that the food is well cooked before being sold which would kill any disease organisms. There must be somethimg else than just this factor involved, I think.
 

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Keep in mind, the company chooses the quality of their by product meal. A high quality by-product meal can be more nutritious than a low quality chicken meal.
but without clear labeling you have no idea what byproduct is being fed or its true nutritional value. At least with named meat meal, you know that all you're getting is bone with meat attached to it and you can sort of gauge the meat to bone ratio based on calcium/phos levels.
For example food contains meals should naturally be high in calcium, if calcium is added, theres probably not much meat meal in the food and its usually bulked up with plant protein.


One of the company that uses clearly labeled byproducts is back to basics

Duck and Chicken Giblets (Livers and Hearts) Duck Meal Chicken Meal Tapioca Peas Dried Whole Egg Pea Protein Duck Fat (Preserved with Mixed Tocopherols) Whole Flaxseed Natural Duck Flavor Pea Fiber Menhaden Fish Oil Sunflower Oil Salt Potassium Chloride Choline Chloride Zinc Proteinate Iron Proteinate Vitamin E Supplement L-Carnitine L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (Source of Vitamin C) Manganese Proteinate Biotin Copper Proteinate Niacin Calcium Pantothenate Sodium Selenite Vitamin A Supplement Riboflavin Supplement Vitamin D3 Supplement Thiamine Mononitrate Vitamin B12 Supplement Calcium Iodate Pyridoxine Hydrochloride Folic Acid

I have no problem with this food whatsoever. In fact I'll probably add it to my rotation.
 

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but without clear labeling you have no idea what byproduct is being fed or its true nutritional value. At least with named meat meal, you know that all you're getting is bone with meat attached to it and you can sort of gauge the meat to bone ratio based on calcium/phos levels.
For example food contains meals should naturally be high in calcium, if calcium is added, theres probably not much meat meal in the food and its usually bulked up with plant protein.


One of the company that uses clearly labeled byproducts is back to basics

Duck and Chicken Giblets (Livers and Hearts) Duck Meal Chicken Meal Tapioca Peas Dried Whole Egg Pea Protein Duck Fat (Preserved with Mixed Tocopherols) Whole Flaxseed Natural Duck Flavor Pea Fiber Menhaden Fish Oil Sunflower Oil Salt Potassium Chloride Choline Chloride Zinc Proteinate Iron Proteinate Vitamin E Supplement L-Carnitine L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (Source of Vitamin C) Manganese Proteinate Biotin Copper Proteinate Niacin Calcium Pantothenate Sodium Selenite Vitamin A Supplement Riboflavin Supplement Vitamin D3 Supplement Thiamine Mononitrate Vitamin B12 Supplement Calcium Iodate Pyridoxine Hydrochloride Folic Acid

I have no problem with this food whatsoever. In fact I'll probably add it to my rotation.
Most 'holistic' dog foods do not even list their phosphorus levels. Ash levels need to be taken into account. The more bone the meal contains, the lower quality, and the high the calcium/phosphorus will be. High calcium is not necessarily a good thing. Chicken meal, lamb meal, etc is also not labeled as far as quality goes. All things included in by-product meal are valuable sources. None of them have no nutritional value.
 

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Something that always bothered me about these types of articles. To a wild carnivore including feral dogs, a downer or almost-downer prey animal - be it from disease, old age, accident, or whatever - is a ringing dinner ball. An easy meal So where did the idea originate that food made from such animals is bad for dogs for that reason alone? Considering also that the food is well cooked before being sold which would kill any disease organisms. There must be somethimg else than just this factor involved, I think.
Downer cows aren't suppposed to be used in the human food supply because of Mad Cow. Probably the same for dogs. If you knew why the cow was down--bad knee or hip, etc.--that would be fine but in the general supply there's no way to know. And Mad Cow prions aren't killed by heat.
 

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Oh my word articles like this irritate the holy piss out of me. The majority of dog and cat processing plants in the US (those that you should be buying anyways!!) have regulations that are equal to those of plants that process for human consumption. The main reason they actually do this is a little gross, but it because people do eat dog and cat food and those companies don't want to get sued for making humans sick. Sounds stupid I know but you can sue for anything these days.

Willowy is right, if an animal cannot get off the trailer by itself at a processing plant it cannot be slaughtered. Period. they stick it back on the truck and dispose of it through incineration or other means. Not into anyones food supply, human or animal. Do they honestly thing that roadkill can be used in a processing plant? Those plants have to be inspected just like human grade processing plants.

Read this please and calm down. This as almost as bad as the "pink slime" debacle

http://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/Products/AnimalFoodFeeds/PetFood/ucm2006475.htm
 

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if an animal cannot get off the trailer by itself at a processing plant it cannot be slaughtered. Period. they stick it back on the truck and it normally goes to a rendering plant where ie becomes meat and bone meal or a number of other options. Not into anyones food supply, human or animal.
Umm. . .? "Meat and bone meal" IS used in pet foods and livestock feed. I would say that's in the food supply.
 

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I said that in error and I fixed it after I looked into it further. Obama passed the downer cattle law in 2008 and since then no down animal can be used in the food supply whatsoever. Animal or not. I apologize for posting before I finished looking that up. I got antsy.
 

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I am from England, and my father actually transports the meats they use in dog foods, I am not sure which brands but I know that it is not pleasant smelling when he comes home! All sorts of dead animal meats go into what they call "quality dog food". I would stick to fresh and butchered meats for all my dogs!
 

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Downer cows aren't suppposed to be used in the human food supply because of Mad Cow. Probably the same for dogs. If you knew why the cow was down--bad knee or hip, etc.--that would be fine but in the general supply there's no way to know. And Mad Cow prions aren't killed by heat.
Sorry - that isn't relevant.

1. Downer animals other than beef animals CAN be slaughtered acording to the USDA. Only downer beef is prohibited. And minimally ambulatory, 'almost-downer' animals of any kind - including beef animals - can be slaughtered without restrictions. So chances are that even the 'human-grade' meat in your supermarket meat case may contain them.

2. There is no scientific evidence to date that dogs can or ever have contracted Mad Cow Disease.


So I am still curious as to why a food element that would be an important part of a wild carnivore diet is considered unacceptable in a cooked and processed dog food.

Finally, the whole meat-and-bone meal issue may soon become OBE. As bio-diesel and alternate energy sources become more popular, MBM may be diverted from the food chain. In that case, the dog food manufacturers who want to continue to use meat and meat meals will be almost forced to use slaughtered meat anyway. This has already happened in some parts of the world where almost all the MBM is used as a fuel source. Of course, the cost of your average dog food is going to go up significantly when that happens.
 

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Any cattle that are over the age of 32 months are slaughtered and then have their spines removed during processing to eliminate the chance of BSE (mad cow.) While cats could possibly contract BSE, called FSE in this case, there has never been a reported case in the US. Dogs are incapable of contracting mad cow disease. It is not transferable to them, in the same way that a dog with a cold cannot transmit that cold to their human.

The majority of poultry-by-product is from male chicks of egg laying birds, and spent hens. The males of that genetic strain have absolutely no value to the market or really to anyone. You don't need a rooster for a hen to produce an egg, most commercial egg layers go their whole lives without seeing a male bird. They get sexed the day they are born and the males are macerated to instantly kill them.
Spent hens are egg laying hens that are no longer useful for production. They may still lay eggs, but not of the quality and frequency the American public demands.

As a side note: This is only the US perspective, I only have a very basic understanding of other standards outside the US.
 
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