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My wife absolutely is letting my one dog do the wrong thing too often. In fact, she often encourages it, but then gets angry when the dog goes too far.

I am constantly, and i mean constantly telling her that the dog is getting mixed messages, and we need to be as one..... and she admits that she does this, but never stops making these same mistakes over and over.

Suggestions on if there is anything I can do, short of shooting my my wife.
 

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I'm having the same issues with an 11 year old boy and an 8 year old girl. I eventually had to ban them from the dog. Not sure that you could do that with your wife though.
 

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MY hubby does that too, but I don't have any issues with it. It just means that they generally don't listen to him (well, Pixie does because she's naturally obedient, but Obi doesn't), and I just train them consistently. So they listen to me and they experience being right more often than they are wrong.
 

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My husband doesn't follow through either, so the dogs have gotten to where they'll obey me, but not always him. Tell your wife to quit complaining when the dogs don't obey her, since she won't follow the training protocol.
 

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I think that would make an excellent book... How to stop Other People from Fouling up your Dog Training!
Other people are no problem but a book about explaining to your wife about messing up the dog would be a best seller. (actually explaining anything to a wife)
 

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I have the same problem with my husband. If only Ian Dunbar would start a site on how to train your spouse... :p
Amen!! Mine is generally good in using the proper word to correct Molly but he's not helpful on walks when I'm trying to work with her leash pulling problem, which is frustrating so I definitely do feel everyone's pain, LOL.
 

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Other people are no problem but a book about explaining to your wife about messing up the dog would be a best seller. (actually explaining anything to a wife)
Wives? We're easy. Yesterday, my husband couldn't find the frozen corn. It was only the first thing anyone could possibly see in the freezer, where we have kept frozen things since ever.

As to the OP, some people just aren't good at figuring out that doing the same thing over and over again never yields different results.
 

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Well, here is an example..... this dog is naturally very mouthy. She doesn't mean to harm anybody.... she's a lovebug, albeit a 45 pound lovebug with very sharp teeth..... I am trying to stop the dog from being mouthy at all... so here it what my wife does.... she spins her hands around the dogs snout over and over, and then the dog playfully responds with using her teeth.... but then as it goes on longer, the dog gets more excited, and the teeth on her hands eventually lead to her yelling "No!".

That's just one thing, but that's the thing that happens an awful lot.
 

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What are the "mistakes" that she is making? And when you got the dog, did you sit down and agree on a training program that you are both comfortable with? If you didn't do that, and she disagrees with something, but is saying she will do it just to make you happy, no WONDER you are having issues!

So many times I have seen a couple get a dog, not talk about training at all, and then get into fights because they are not being consistent and the dog isn't behaving as a result. Bear in mind that although you may think that you know exactly what is "right", the dog belongs to both of you, and she needs a say in training too.

Rather than just TELLING her what to do, have you sat down and asked her WHY she is doing something? And be specific - don't say "why are you always giving the dog mixed messages and not doing what I say?". Instead, ask "at breakfast, you didn't wait for the dog to become calm before allowing him his food - why didn't you wait?". You should get a much clearer answer, and then be able to start a discussion. In that instance, maybe she was in a rush, and then you can talk about getting the dog up a little earlier to combat that, or maybe she is getting really frustrated with waiting, and needs some reassurance and help with being patient. Maybe she just doesn't understand WHY it is a good idea to calm the dog down, and you can talk about why you both think the way you do about feeding, and come to an agreement about what is ok.

Essentially, consistency is probably the most important part of training, and you'll probably get a more obedient dog if you both do the same thing, even if it isn't exactly what YOU would do, rather than have you do what is "right", and your wife do what she thinks is "right".
 

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I call my husband the "untrainer". But my dogs are smart enough (and trained enough - by me) to know my rules vs. his lack of rules. If it was an issue for me (it isn't) I would consider taking a class that we both go to so he could hear it from someone other than his spouse. When the spouse says it, it becomes nagging. When an accredited stranger says it, it is valued information.
 

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Well, here is an example..... this dog is naturally very mouthy. She doesn't mean to harm anybody.... she's a lovebug, albeit a 45 pound lovebug with very sharp teeth..... I am trying to stop the dog from being mouthy at all... so here it what my wife does.... she spins her hands around the dogs snout over and over, and then the dog playfully responds with using her teeth.... but then as it goes on longer, the dog gets more excited, and the teeth on her hands eventually lead to her yelling "No!".

That's just one thing, but that's the thing that happens an awful lot.
My boyfriend does something similar. He plays with her with his hands so much that now Wicket sees hands as toys. She doesn't bite down that hard, but when she's jumping at you and moving around those teeth scratch and dig in and it really hurts! I wanted to nick the behavior in the butt early when she was puppy, but my boyfriend said it's fine and she'll out grow it. Little less than a year later, she hasn't stopped and is getting more vicious with her mouthing. I know it's normal for dogs to play with their mouths, but not everyone likes a dog start out biting them when they first say "Hello". When she gets into the mode, my boyfriend just yells at her and smacks her away. She's not going to get that she's being too forceful or that he wants her to stop, Wicket thinks it's ALL play and keeps on jumping and trying to bite. He loves that she bites and that she jumps and dismisses it as "okay" since she's little and cute and that HE is able to get her to stop (fat chance), but because of that I have not been able to stop her biting or jumping at the slightest. What bothers me the most is that she's transferred the behavior outside of play and onto every time she is excited, including greeting new and old people. She has jumped on and bitten children before too. I tell them to wait for her to calm down while I hold her while they pet her, this usually helps, but you know how kids are and they get over excited which transfers to her. Even worst is when kids swarm Wicket and pet her without permission or when I say "no" and try to walk away. Result is Wicket jumping all over them and mouthing them. It's never hard biting and most kids shriek with enjoyment thinking it's funny, but some run away scared. I see the liability, my boyfriend doesn't. If a big dog cannot get away with that behavior, why should a little dog?
 

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I had the same problem, I just used the same deep stern voice and said enough! When she asked "why are you talking to me like a dog?", I calmly told her its because she was acting like a bitch.. ;)
 

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I "play fight" with my dog and have a "stop" command which means "stop biting/being crazy now!" and it works like a charm. She also never starts up unless I rile her up first, but I think that's more due to her age and settling down.
 

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I "play fight" with my dog and have a "stop" command which means "stop biting/being crazy now!" and it works like a charm. She also never starts up unless I rile her up first, but I think that's more due to her age and settling down.
I just tell mine to "be nice", works pretty well if you you let them know what expectable behavior if first. I did by saying "ouch" real loud when mine bites, then quit playing with him all together and if that didn't do it (which in most cases it did) I fish hooked his bottom jaw and told him "be nice"!
 
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