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There is nothing I can offer her. There is no treat or toy more valuable to this dog than dragging me around the neighborhood. And she is reactive to other dogs on the leash (lunging/barking) despite being pretty polite off lead.

I finally gave up and use a head collar to walk her. She hates it, but now we can at least manage. I can't take her in public because she is still reactive and looks vicious. This isn't good for PR when you're a 80lb Pyr.

This dog is such a sweetheart, but she turns into a werewolf when we leave the threshold of my door. I'm sure there are a thousand and one things I'm doing wrong, but if anyone as insight on my issues I would appreciate your input.
 

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Sounds like you have your hands full - quite literally. Have you tried working on LLW in less distracting areas? Work in your living room, then in your backyard, then driveway, and slowly work your way up to walking in the neighborhood. Look up Choose to Heel and try that in an enclosed area or a safe environment with a long line. The idea is that the dog learns that being near you is rewarding; it's generally taught off leash so there's no leash pulling associated with the exercise.

If walking out your door causes such a big reaction, you might try working on being calm inside and, again slowly, work your way up to walking through the door. It might start with your moving your hand towards the doorknob and reinforcing her for being calm. Do that a few times, then quit. At your next session, start there and if she's still calm, put your hand on the doorknob. Reinforce calm and quit. Progress slowly.

In the meantime, can you keep her walks relatively calm? Just walk on your property or at times when she's less likely to encounter other dogs? Also, have you seen the Resources for Leash Reactive Dogs sticky at the top of this section?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That's a lot of great info. Thanks. I will check out the resources you provided. I can say we have worked extensively in the house. That's what seems so strange to me. Indoors she is always underfoot. Super relaxed, and very easy to lead on a leash. I guess we need more work on the transition to the yard. I would love to be able to go places with this dog. She is so great for me at home. It would be great if we could bring that behavior to the pet store and the park.
 

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I used front clip harnesses and a prong for a while on one of my dogs. He needed a chance to grow up, calm down, and develop some impulse control. Now I clip to the front of his harness occasionally, and I haven't used the prong for probably a year. So I don't have a problem with using tools to get through the tough times.
 

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How old is your dog, and how long have you been working on it? I have been working with my 1 year 5 month old dog on LLW since he was 5 months old, and he is just beginning to understand that UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES should he pull on the leash. He's just beginning to grow enough of a brain to control himself and not lunge at every piece of trash, bush, or person.

Like Cookieface said, look at the Reactive dog sticky at the top of the forum. It has a boat load of good information to help you!
 

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I just wanted to let you know you are definitely not alone. My guy is about 75-80 lbs, and has the full GSD look. He's also leash reactive because he's excited to see other dogs and gets frustrated he can't get to them. He seems like such a vicious dog when he's barking and lunging, but in truth he is the sweetest, most submissive to other dogs dog I've ever met. Off leash, he plays nicely with all dogs and adores people. It is hands down one of the most frustrating things I've ever dealt with.

I can't offer advice that hasn't been mentioned (we do impulse control all day, every day -- for his breakfast, for his tug toys, for his fetch, for going outside, etc and work on LLW in the house, and for the reactivity we've been working on a really strong "look at me" and lots of rewards for staying calm when dogs walk by) but wanted you to know you aren't alone! Just remember, sometimes rewards can be things you wouldn't think of (for example, the best "treats" for Quill are a game of tug and snow...SNOW! He loves it. The other day, two people and their dog walked right by and not once did he look away from me because I had a snowball in my hand) and it will get better. I can see small improvements in Quill, but it has been a long and bumpy road.
 

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what does this mean ?

This isn't good for PR when you're a 80lb Pyr.

I get PR could be public relations...... but am curious if Pyr means GP as in great pyrenees ?
 

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just saw another post of yours and it is a GP.... not the same type of dog... for what your doing in how they respond or lack of interest in training like other breeds of dogs are... It makes a lot of sense now,, they can be reactive, dog aggressive, they are not interested in being drilled in OB they are independent thinkers, need a job and a breed of many LGD's that are roamers and escape artist to be roamers by nature of their breed that need proper fencing..
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
just saw another post of yours and it is a GP.... not the same type of dog... for what your doing in how they respond or lack of interest in training like other breeds of dogs are... It makes a lot of sense now,, they can be reactive, dog aggressive, they are not interested in being drilled in OB they are independent thinkers, need a job and a breed of many LGD's that are roamers and escape artist to be roamers by nature of their breed that need proper fencing..
I did mean public relations.
She is a Pyrenees. I knew about their breed traits when I decided to keep her and in many ways she lives up to all of them. She has escaped the yard multiple times and now has to live pretty much inside all of the time. She doesn't seem to mind that as she is older and low energy in the house. I know they are stubborn creatures, but I have seen that they can be trained. I guess it will take a bigger person than me to do it. Bigger in both a physical and behavioral sense.
 

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@Lillith
I found Hime on the side of the road about a year ago, so exact age is up in the air. The vet thinks 6 years or up. So she is experienced to say the least. I don't think she is a senior yet because of how spry she is, but I'm no professional.
 

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I used front clip harnesses and a prong for a while on one of my dogs. He needed a chance to grow up, calm down, and develop some impulse control. Now I clip to the front of his harness occasionally, and I haven't used the prong for probably a year. So I don't have a problem with using tools to get through the tough times.
We have tried just about every product you can imagine. I can give detailed reviews after all my struggles. I appreciate your understanding. Let's hope these though times don't last forever.
 

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My guy is the same type of breed.. They not stubborn, they just not interested or easily amused. so it's not a refusal it's just not important to expend energy. Some individuals in the breed are better suited to be pets and do not make good workers, and others in the breed are better suited to be workers and don't make good pets So you have to take it by individual. What do you need to fix your fence?
 

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My guy is the same type of breed.. They not stubborn, they just not interested or easily amused. so it's not a refusal it's just not important to expend energy. Some individuals in the breed are better suited to be pets and do not make good workers, and others in the breed are better suited to be workers and don't make good pets So you have to take it by individual. What do you need to fix your fence?
I need it to be about three feet taller. Of the five dogs that live here, Hime and my chi mix are the escape artists. The chi climbs and she just leaps over in a bound. It's been about two years since her last attempt, but this latest time she escaped she got into some trouble. So now I let her back there only when I can supervises constantly. I don't think she was ever a working dog. Livestock freaks her out actually. She is very relaxed indoors and low energy. Really only gets riled when bicycles, trucks, and strange dogs are concerned.
 

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I need it to be about three feet taller. Of the five dogs that live here, Hime and my chi mix are the escape artists. The chi climbs and she just leaps over in a bound. It's been about two years since her last attempt, but this latest time she escaped she got into some trouble. So now I let her back there only when I can supervises constantly. I don't think she was ever a working dog. Livestock freaks her out actually. She is very relaxed indoors and low energy. Really only gets riled when bicycles, trucks, and strange dogs are concerned.

They are a very calm still breed. Coming from high prey breeds it's been interesting being around the LGD's you almost want to walk over and check to see if they still breathing for not moving for hours... lol lol ... Many people use the underground invisible fencing system, they are an explosive type dog when they engage on changes like the bikes, trucks and other dogs am not surprised in that area, but at the same time they can be sensitive that the collar match with an invisible fencing system works placed before people's actual fence. something to look into.
 

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They are a very calm still breed. Coming from high prey breeds it's been interesting being around the LGD's you almost want to walk over and check to see if they still breathing for not moving for hours... lol lol ... Many people use the underground invisible fencing system, they are an explosive type dog when they engage on changes like the bikes, trucks and other dogs am not surprised in that area, but at the same time they can be sensitive that the collar match with an invisible fencing system works placed before people's actual fence. something to look into.
I always thought she would just barrel through, but you've convinced me to give it a try. Thanks.
 

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I always thought she would just barrel through, but you've convinced me to give it a try. Thanks.
never used one and would not trust one as a stand alone fencing system. Lots of farmers use hot wire on their standing fencing system, and I hear them talk about the invisible fencing system again added before to an already standing fence. So all the training with the dog , that needs to be done for this type of fence needs to be done. My thought is if they don't go to the fence then jumping over it doesn't happen.

for my guys I have 5ft and 6ft fencing and when my guy was younger he only left the property when he was staying with one of the animals that he was bonded with that left the property, doing his guard work when the neighbors were baiting him thinking they were safe to tease him that he couldn't get out of the fence and when the first time as a younger pup that he experienced the ranchers bringing in open range cattle that he wanted to go stay with them. It was part of his training to walk all the fence lines teaching boundaries and maturity kicks ins.

They are different dogs when they engage in their jobs. Best wishes...
 
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