Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

My Labrador Retriever/German Shepherd mix is 13 weeks old. He has done a Petco Zoom class, and also has done a puppy socialization class that had some basic commands in there (sit, come, down, etc). I was wondering when the best time to do a boarding/training session would be? Is it better to do sooner rather than later?
Any insight is great! Thank you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,792 Posts
Never, in my opinion. It's much better for the two of you to learn together.

Also, far too many board and train people use compulsion and e-collars. I took a class with someone who did board and train... she practically yanked her demo dog off his feet, and then rolled and pinned him down in the middle of a competition novice obedience class. His "crime" had been to sit up instead of staying in a down. If she was comfortable doing that in a public class, I shudder to think of what went on when there was nobody around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Never, in my opinion. It's much better for the two of you to learn together.

Also, far too many board and train people use compulsion and e-collars. I took a class with someone who did board and train... she practically yanked her demo dog off his feet, and then rolled and pinned him down in the middle of a competition novice obedience class. His "crime" had been to sit up instead of staying in a down. If she was comfortable doing that in a public class, I shudder to think of what went on when there was nobody around.
Oh my gosh... that’s terrible!! Will definitely think of that. I know me and Gus (my puppy) have definitely been working on different behaviors and training. We’re definitely forming a bond.
Plus, boarding and training is very expensive. There is one that my counselor had recommended that I was thinking of looking into, but that was the only one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
371 Posts
I'm with LeoRose. Train your own. This isn't a great time to find in-person classes, but the trainer I work with is holding classes - limited numbers, distancing, all that. Work with your baby at home and then in gradually more and more distracting environments. If you find a class you can attend together, remember that if the trainer recommends a method you're not comfortable with, don't do it. If someone tries something like what LeoRose described, stop them if you can, and make sure they never do it again if you can't stop it fast enough. Never go along because someone is a supposed expert. It's your dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
514 Posts
Hello,

My Labrador Retriever/German Shepherd mix is 13 weeks old. He has done a Petco Zoom class, and also has done a puppy socialization class that had some basic commands in there (sit, come, down, etc). I was wondering when the best time to do a boarding/training session would be? Is it better to do sooner rather than later?
Any insight is great! Thank you!
Why would you even be considering a 'board & train'? Especially for a 13 week old puppy? You need to be working with him, not some stranger. IMO, there are very, very, very, very few (if any) situations that warrant a B & T option (and even fewer B & T facilities that I would even consider leaving a dog with...)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,343 Posts
Never.

Unless you know very well and personally the trainer and even then with caution.

I too have seen what LeoRose describes. The thing is, much of training takes A) time and B) interaction with the owner who will continue the training

Board and trains often (not always but way more often than I would ever be comfortable with to recommend using them) assure results after the 1-3 week boarding and to get results fast, go right to punishment techniques like e-collars and collar pops and excessive crating.

I have seen dogs that ended up needing to be euthanized after longish stays at board and trains who did not disclose their punishment based methods and where their public persona had fairly minimal red flags to a newer or inexperienced dog owner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Why would you even be considering a 'board & train'? Especially for a 13 week old puppy? You need to be working with him, not some stranger. IMO, there are very, very, very, very few (if any) situations that warrant a B & T option (and even fewer B & T facilities that I would even consider leaving a dog with...)
I want him to get the best training for ESA. I don’t necessarily WANT him to do that, because it’d be hard for me to be away from him that long (I can barely even go a weekend without him) but it is something to look into.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Never.

Unless you know very well and personally the trainer and even then with caution.

I too have seen what LeoRose describes. The thing is, much of training takes A) time and B) interaction with the owner who will continue the training

Board and trains often (not always but way more often than I would ever be comfortable with to recommend using them) assure results after the 1-3 week boarding and to get results fast, go right to punishment techniques like e-collars and collar pops and excessive crating.

I have seen dogs that ended up needing to be euthanized after longish stays at board and trains who did not disclose their punishment based methods and where their public persona had fairly minimal red flags to a newer or inexperienced dog owner.
I will say the on my counselor recommended has an option of board and training or do it yourself. We’re getting him a consultation in September (earliest we could get it) but not for the board and training but for the group/private lessons.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Sorry for asking this question. I don’t necessarily WANT him to be boarded and trained, but it is a thought for me. I already have to board him some because of my surgeries and doctor appointments (my dentist is 2 hours away) so why not get some training in?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,343 Posts
Sorry for asking this question. I don’t necessarily WANT him to be boarded and trained, but it is a thought for me. I already have to board him some because of my surgeries and doctor appointments (my dentist is 2 hours away) so why not get some training in?
Because all the risks and negatives mentioned above can apply whenever you give someone permission to train your dog in your absence. "Board and train" programs may advertise more progress or guarantees than just a boarding kennel that offers optional training sessions during the boarding time frame, but it all boils down to two main thins IMO

You risk them using adversive/inappropriate/punishment based methods EVEN if they state otherwise

Even with proper positive reinforcement methods, its hard to "translate" what a dog has been taught for you to carry on with the commands and advance on the training when you haven't been part of it. This can be confusing and frustrating for dog and owner.

But definitely do deep research on the boarding options as there can be some nice little minor training or play options; stuff where they do not promise any mastery of new commands etc but maybe just spend a play break from the kennel encouraging sit or stay with a treat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,792 Posts
An ESA doesn't require any training, That said, basic manners makes life a lot more pleasant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,771 Posts
In my experience, the kind of people I'd be willing to allow to 'board and train' my dogs don't actually call their services 'board and train'. I'd still personally need an existing relationship and significant level of trust with someone before I let them take my dog and work with them without me in their home or facility, and there's only a few circumstances I could see that kind of setup being more beneficial than anything I could do at home. General good manners aren't on that list, because as others have mentioned, many dogs don't generalize 'I behave this way in X space' to 'I also behave this way at home'. Or even 'I respond immediately to X command when person A says it' to 'I respond immediately to X command when my owner says it'.

Puppy raising is a little different, where the puppy raiser will likely have already started on some fundamental manners training and foundational behaviors for a good house dog (or sports dog, or service dog prospect, depending on the situation). But a good puppy raiser focuses mainly on socialization and helping the pup develop into a stable, confident dog, and doesn't guarantee to the puppy's owner that they're now 'fully trained' and need no further work, ever. But that's not something you see much outside of certain service/working dog communities, or occasionally with sports dogs.

I'm rambling. Basically, most board and train facilities make their money on being able to hand over 'fixed' dogs after a relatively short amount of time, and promising the owners they have to do little or nothing to maintain the new behavior. Sadly, one of the best ways to achieve a dog that doesn't show 'bad' behaviors is to make it so scared to behave at all outside of direct commands that it basically acts like a lump the rest of the time. And also sadly, many dog owners see this as a good thing because they don't understand why their dog is acting this way. While I'm sure there are a few board and train facilities out there that don't take the 'by any means necessary' approach to getting results, it's so prevalent that I wouldn't risk it with my dogs.

I agree that a boarding place that does some training sessions as fun mental enrichment during your dog's stay would be a better bet, though definitely still vet them thoroughly in regards to what kind of techniques they use. And LeoRose is also absolutely right - in the US, ESAs do not need any specific special training, since they don't have public access rights beyond what a pet dog has.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top