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So my boyfriend and I are awaiting for a home check (may not be until September due to us moving) for a senior Italian Greyhound. We know that his top teeth have been removed and we have to get his bottom teeth removed so we know he's going to be solely on wet/soft food (will probably do a mix of wet food and like frozen patties melted into a soup like texture) but I have a few questions about that.

So he's ten years old. We're in the process of awaiting the questions to if he has any health issues like joints, eyes, etc. Once we find that out, I'm sure that will give us some more ideas.

With all of that being said, if he is not having any senior-related health issues, does he need to be on strictly wet food made for seniors or can he be on just regular adult wet food?

EDIT: But along with that, how much wet should I be feeding him? 1/4 of a can?
 

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Barring any health issues that would require a special type of food, you can get away with a quality all life stages wet food. You would have to start feeding with the recommendations on the back of the can. Typically it seems the recommended feeding amount is inflated and way too much, especially for an elderly dog that likely isn't very active, but if the dog starts gaining too much weight, back off. If it seems they're getting too lean, add more food.

Also, ask the dog's fosters what and how much they feed him. That may be an even better place to start, as you don't want to upset his gut by switching to a new food cold turkey.

And of course, talk to the vet. Vets aren't necessarily nutritionists, so keep that in mind, but they might be able to give you some suggestions for toothless dogs.
 

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A couple thoughts:

- “Senior” foods tend to lower protein and fat content and add carbohydrates to manage weight
- I continue to feed adult foods for my nearly 10-year old Australian Shepherd
- I want reasonably high protein content (>25%) to prevent muscle loss, lower fiber content(<4%) for easy digestibility
- My food rotation is fairly calorie dense at 410-470 kcal/cup, but I have reduced daily kcal intake by about 15%
- I supplement both meals with an Omega 3/6/9 supplement to elevate his DHA/EPA levels
- I also supplement with NZ Green Lipped Mussel/Glucosamine/Chondroitin supplement in the evening.
 
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