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I am going to be getting a scottish collie here soon and I was wondering if there are any tips/ suggestion for introducing a cat to a dog? Now, the cat that I have is used to other animals (cats only). And, in the past, introducing two cats is a fairly simple process. (Just make sure that they don't kill each other! lol kidding!) My main concerns are that the collie is going to want a lot of attention so that my cat my feel alienated. Also, I am owrried that the collie's natural want for campionship might be too overwhelming for my cat at first.

Am I being over paranoid OR what!? Thanks again for your help! :wave:
 

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expect lots of hissing for a while. make use of baby gates and a crate to contain the puppy and allow the cat its freedom. also set the cat up with all his needs (food, water, litter box, toys) in a room where the door can be closed. think of it as the cats safe room. make sure you continue to give him lots of love and attention or he may begin marking. your dog and cat may never be best friends but they will eventually tolerate each other. just make sure they trade off quiet/private time, and time to roam and explore. leashing or crating your dog in the house and allowing the cat to greet on his own terms will make things easier.
 

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Just wondering if you're getting an adult or puppy.

Adopting an adult: you can take the cat in to meet the dog (mostly to see how the dog will react to the cat).
Getting a puppy: just make sure you train the puppy to be nice to the cat!

The way we introduced our cat to Snowball (at the shelter) was the cat stayed in his carrier with the door closed, and the dog went up and sniffed at it. Then we opened the carrier door with a firm hold on Snowball's leash several feet away. Then once it was obvious we let Snowball walk around the room with the leash still attached. The cat was definitely wary of the dog, but for the most part they ignored each other. After we brought Snowball home, the cat definitely got jealous of the dog. We now ensure that every couple of days one of us takes the dog for a walk and the cat gets extra special kitty play time for the duration (or as much as he'll stand). I also try to give him extra special cuddles when the dog is napping. Unfortunately, our cat really likes playing with feathery toys... and of course we got a dog with feathered legs and tail. Whoops! Snowball is very tolerant though. I wish he was as calm around other dogs as he is around cats!
 

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The way I do it works for my cats as they are calm and not going to scratch me or panic. If your cats will, don't try this, but this has always worked for me. I do this method because initially the dog is often just curious about the cat. If the first introduction is of the cat running, it is instantly something to be chased and played with. If it is through a barrier, it can create a lot of frustration and over-excitement for the dog. **DO** use a barrier if you have any concern that the dog will go after the cat in an aggressive manner *or* if you cannot keep the cat from running away. You really, really don't want the cat to run away at first. The safety of all animals and people is the number one priority. Use barriers, muzzles, head collars, or any equipment you know how to use that you feel is necessary. Do *not* use any correctional collars such as a choke or pinch collar as you do not want the dog to associate seeing the cat = pain. The cat can teach that itself ;)

First steps:
1. Put the cat in a bathroom, laundry room, or other room for when the dog first arrives.
2. Lead the dog around the house, on leash, to let it smell all the new smells and settle in a bit.

Introductions, the long version:
1. Have someone holding the dog's leash and have the dog in a head collar for added control if you are concerned about how the dog will react. I wouldn't use a head collar for a puppy.
2. Have the dog sit, if it knows the command. Use lots of treats to reward the dog for sitting, or if it doesn't know sit then simply use treats to keep its attention.
3. Bring out the cat by carrying it in your arms. You do *not* want to have the first introduction by a cat sprinting across the room like a rabbit.
4. Continue rewarding the dog for sitting, or if not sitting then continue giving treats. A dog too intensely focused on the cat will not take treats. Use super yummy soft treats like cheese, hot dogs, or peanut butter.
5. Walk over with the cat. If the dog gets too excited to take treats, turn your back so the cat is out of view. Reward the dog once it is able to take treats again. This teaches the dog that being calm around the cat is a good thing.
6. Once you can approach the dog, kneel down with the cat and present it butt first to the dog. Make sure the dog is not straining or pulling, allow the leash to be loose so there is no added tension or frustration but makes sure there is not so much slack that the dog can get itself into trouble.
**Watching for any signs of aggression. The biggest sign I usually see if there's going to be trouble is that the dog is completely stiff and motionless. The mouth is closed and tight. The ears are forward. The tails is stiff and straight out or up, possibly wagging slightly. Do not approach the dog if it is behaving this way.**
Presenting the cat butt first is ideal for several reasons. First, that's the dog way to greet. It's what the dog most wants to do. Second, if there is going to be an issue, I'd rather have the cat get a nip on the tail or butt than on the face or head.
7. Allow the dog to smell the cat's butt as much as it wants to, as long as it is not getting overly excited. It's normal for the dog to be excited but I do not allow pawing, mouthing, barking, bouncing, or rough nose bumping. Turn the cat away if needed.
8. If you are not comfortable allowing a face-to-face interaction, skip this step. If the dog is remaining relatively calm and in control, I carefully allow it to smell the rest of the cat. When getting near the cat's head, I turn the cat so it has use of its front paws. My cats always give light "warning" baps to the dog. I do allow the cats to smack the dog if the dog gets pushy, but my cats do not panic of go into full attack mode. They are so used to meeting new dogs that their tails don't even poof up anymore. Cats and dogs, in my experience (even when mine were new at this) do perfectly well at setting the rules and boundaries for each other on their own. You want to be there to keep things safe but your dog ultimately will need to learn from the cat what the cat's rules are. My 8 lb cat can calmly raise a paw and my dog will lay down.
9. If all is going well, I allow the cat to walk away. My cats do indeed just walk away. I then take the leash and allow the dog to follow the cat as long as it is not pulling or lunging, barking, or showing other excited behaviors. If you cat will run, you may want to put it on its cat tree or other place it often goes where it feels secure. Then take the leash. Again, you don't want the cat running at first.
10. Have the dog drag a leash through the house the first couple days or at least until you are comfortable with the way the animals approach and interact with each other.

Make sure there are PLENTY of spaces the cat can QUICKLY get to EVERYWHERE in the house that the dog cannot reach. Behind couches, up a cat tree, under a bed, etc. ALWAYS supervise the pets together and NEVER leave them unattended together.

The short version I've adopted since my cats are so good at this:
1. Dog is on leash and has toured the house while cats were locked up.
2. I walk right up to the dog and present the cat butt-first to let it have a good smell all over. (Watching, of course, for any signs the interaction won't go well before getting them too close)
This includes allowing a face-to-face if thigns are going well and allowing the cat to use his paws, and claws if he feels the need.
3. Let cat walk away. For my cats, one of them promptly, but calmly, hops up one of the cat trees. The other will promptly will flop onto his back and roll around and invite the dog to interact more.
4. Take leash and allow dog to follow cat, as long as dog does so in an acceptable manner.
5. Dog drags leash for a couple days or until I'm comfortable with the dog-cat interactions

ETA: Again I want to state that this is what works for *my* cats. Yours may not tolerate this. The cat's behavior is crucial in creating a good first experience where the dog learns to respect the cat and that it is NOT for chasing. If the cat wants to actually play with dog (as one of mine does) the cat will say so. Do not assume this will be the case, and treat the situation as a learning experience where the dog is introduced to the cat and learns to respect its space. I let my cats do a lot of the work by raising their paws, hissing, clawless smacking, and very rarely they will extend their claws for a full swat when they feel it's needed. Always supervise and have the dog drag a leash for as long as is needed so you can get control.
 
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