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Hi, I'm new to these forums and the main reason I decided to join is to help find out what is wrong with my 4 yr old Basset Hound. Four years ago, my family decided we wanted another dog because our old Basset passed away. We loved the breed and were looking to get another. One day after school, my family and I drove to a backyard breeder we saw in the newspaper selling Basset Hound puppies. At the time I did not know buying a puppy from a backyard breeder wasn't a good idea because of the risk of inbreeding, and apparently my family didn't know either. Anyways, we picked out a shy puppy who we all agreed on, bought him, and took him home. He did have valid papers. As a puppy, he was cheerful and adventurous. But over the years, we've noticed he has acted strangely. He seems to be scared of sudden movements, large objects and people he hasn't met. And added to that, whenever you pet him, and then stop, he freaks out and barks and howls at you, even if he knows who you are. I accept the fact that he may be inbred, but what I'm trying to figure out is what is exactly wrong with him. I love him so much, and I don't want his behavior to worsen. Please tell me what I can do to help understand my dog and how I can help him.
 

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All purebred dogs have some level of inbreeding, it's the only way to develop consistency in looks, behavior, and temperament. Inbreeding is not equal to bad breeding, and inbreeding it's self is not inherently bad but should only be left to genetic professionals. We as developed nations have a strong distaste for the practice and it is always looked at thru tainted eyes from those who have never studied the potential benefits, and who only know of the drawbacks and in some cases "Tall Tails" associated with the practice.

With that said I doubt your dogs temperament problems have anything to do with inbreeding as I have seen the same behavior in many mutts I have met. It could be any number of things but likely has a basis in breeding two dogs with poor temperaments and possibly the effect of improper socialization.
 

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I agree with this part 100%...:
I doubt your dogs temperament problems have anything to do with inbreeding as I have seen the same behavior in many mutts I have met. It could be any number of things but likely has a basis in breeding two dogs with poor temperaments and possibly the effect of improper socialization.
..but not this part:
inbreeding it's self is not inherently bad but should only be left to genetic professionals. We as developed nations have a strong distaste for the practice and it is always looked at thru tainted eyes from those who have never studied the potential benefits, and who only know of the drawbacks and in some cases "Tall Tails" associated with the practice.
The reason humans have developed a "strong distaste" for inbreeding is that the results are rarely pretty, no matter what the species. Please name some benefits of inbreeding, other than consistency in looks and temperament. And also please define "genetic professional".
 

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OP, certainly there are often genetic components when looking at fearful behaviour but there is often also nurturing components.
Starting off, you picked a shy puppy. That is likely genetic/temperament based. What sort of socialization did you do as a pup with this dog? Did he have any bad experiences? Did you take him out in the world to learn it (and everything in it) is not a bad thing?

Regardless. You have a fearful dog. Much of this behaviour CAN be modified to a point, but be aware since he started OUT shy that you may not end up with a super friendly, confident dog.

It is hard work to modify fearful behaviour.
You should firstly, if the behaviour has recently gotten worse, have a full vet check.
Then check out some of these resources:
"Help for Your Fearful Dog" Nicole Wilde
www.fearfuldogs.com
The fearful dog thread 1 and 2 (here on DF)

Many of us here have dealt with fears of different kinds so the threads are interesting and helpful, including a lot of support from dog people who've "been there".

Good luck.
 

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The reason humans have developed a "strong distaste" for inbreeding is that the results are rarely pretty, no matter what the species. Please name some benefits of inbreeding, other than consistency in looks and temperament. And also please define "genetic professional".
Why is consistency in temperatment and behavior not a valid benefit? I have also known of a heavy inbred dog who was the perfection of health because his breeder understood what was behind the dogs and what they had produced within the last 10 generations, knew the risks and concluded the benefits would be greater in this case. This dog went on to be the number one stockdog in the history of the breed and his inherited instinct was the most amazing and powerful I have ever known. His siblings from this cross were also great stockdogs.

my definition of a genetic professional in this case would be some one who knows everything in the bloodlines and what they have produced in every aspect and understands the mode of inheritence of any genetic faults.

To not agree with anysort of inbreeding ever is to be compleatly against purebreds of any type, weather they are show dogs, police dogs, military working dogs, sports dogs, service dogs ect.

The reason humans have developed a "strong distaste" for inbreeding is that the results are rarely pretty, no matter what the species. Please name some benefits of inbreeding, other than consistency in looks and temperament. And also please define "genetic professional".
and the results are rarly pretty because too often inbreeding has been done on a whim without knowledge of genetics, I do not support random inbreeding because "Oh I like these dogs" I do not support random inbreeding of any sort. It should only be undertaken with the upmost caution and knowledge.
 
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