Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm seeing all sorts of contradicting information. Some people say to get angry and yell at them, other websites say to ignore them and leave the room immediately - other people say you need to train their bite inhibition by allowing them to bite you but yelling out so they bite with less and less intensity as time goes on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
other weird thing is my girl is very gentle when she's in her exercise pen

but I take her out and she can get in a bad biting mood. Why is this? She's 10 weeks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,449 Posts
The truth is that puppies have teeth that are extraordinarily sharp and pointy, and they use their mouths to explore their world.

Yelling at them has two main possible outcomes: a) you scare the crap out of the puppy so badly that they will take forever to trust you again or b) they think that you are playing with them, and bite harder. Same with being physically rough with them, and doing things like grabbing their muzzle, slapping them, or pinning them down.

Redirecting biting to an appropriate toy or popping them into their crate/removing yourself when they are overly bitey teaches them that "biting this is okay, but biting humans isn't". When most people say "teach them bite inhibition", this is usually what they are talking about.

Are you sure that she's in a "bad biting mood" or is she just being a puppy? Some breeds (usually herding or working) are bitier than others, and even within breeds, there are levels of biteyness. An easily aroused puppy is probably going to be bitier than a more mellow puppy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I was about to ask this question also. I have a female Jack Russell Terrier, about 10 weeks old at this point.

If I try to redirect her biting to a chew toy, that seems to get her even more excited and she wants to go for my hands, shirt sleeve, pant legs, etc.

I’m a new puppy owner so still learning but so far I am not sure if redirecting with a chew toy is helping.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,254 Posts
The reason there is so much contradicting information is different techniques work for different dogs. Some puppies may find yelling to be rewarding while others find it scary. Some puppies will cower if you hold their mouth and some will try to bite you harder. I don't recommend yelling or any physical correction for this behavior.

Instead, you should find appropriate outlets for mouthing such as: chews, tug toys, other enrichment like hunting for food, training with treats, exploring outside, etc.

Understandably, puppies will still have moments when they put their teeth on you. At that point you can ignore the behavior (standing up and not talking or looking at your puppy), or give the puppy a time out. Time out means put the puppy somewhere it can't physically reach you. If the puppy is in a pen, stepping out of the pen would stop the biting because the puppy won't be able to do it anymore. Appropriate outlets plus appropriate time outs will teach your puppy not to be too mouthy with you.

Also, a little management goes a longs ways. For example, if my pup is predictably hyper and bitey after a walk or play session, I'm going to stick the pup in a crate/pen/etc with a chew or stuffed Kong after a walk or play session. I'm not going to just let the puppy wander around the house and wait for it to start playfully attacking me.

Redirection is not a bad idea. But I generally recommend it for about the first 2 weeks and then stopping that as the primary intervention, especially if the biting is the same or getting worse. The reason for that is redirecting is somewhat rewarding (puppy thinks "if I bite you, you put toys or treats in my mouth"). Again, it is NOT a bad suggestion in the beginning. But if people ONLY redirect, without all the stuff I mentioned above (appropriate outlets, time outs, management) then they are going to get stuck with a mouthy puppy at some point.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,254 Posts
other weird thing is my girl is very gentle when she's in her exercise pen

but I take her out and she can get in a bad biting mood. Why is this? She's 10 weeks
The reason for this is the triggers for causing the behavior (ie, your presence, more space, perhaps the presence of other toys) is not present in the pen. The behavior is not reinforced in the pen. But out of the pen, your pup's had the opportunity to run around and bite, and it's probably paid off if you've reacted to it. So she thinks 'out of the pen, I should start biting things because fun things happen... in the pen, there's nothing to bite or biting doesn't make fun things happen'.

I was about to ask this question also. I have a female Jack Russell Terrier, about 10 weeks old at this point.

If I try to redirect her biting to a chew toy, that seems to get her even more excited and she wants to go for my hands, shirt sleeve, pant legs, etc.

I’m a new puppy owner so still learning but so far I am not sure if redirecting with a chew toy is helping.
If the biting is not reducing, what you're doing is not helping. One common challenge with redirecting is the type of toy people use. A lot of people will reach for a cute stuffed animal, rubber toy, knotted rope... the stuff you most commonly see in pet stores. Also, a lot of people pick up a toy off the ground in hopes of appeasing the puppy. Both these are mistakes. A solid toy (ex. a very plush stuffed animal) don't allow those tiny puppy teeth and weak puppy jaws to get a satisfying grip. That's why clothes are so appealing for puppies. A toy that is on the floor is not interesting because it's available 24/7, whereas the chance to bite at you is not always available.

The solution is to have a long, flimsy tug (I literally used an old tshirt scrap) on you at all times, like a pacifier for a baby, and only providing it when you are deliberately playing with your puppy appropriately.

There's a lot more to be said about appropriate redirection, and in my other comment I wrote about how redirection alone can cause more problems down the road. The short of it is, YOU engage your puppy to play when your puppy is being good and calm. Don't let your puppy engage you to play by biting you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
The short of it is, YOU engage your puppy to play when your puppy is being good and calm. Don't let your puppy engage you to play by biting you.
What if any sort of playing always escalates to relentless biting? I started giving short time outs in the crate for few days now. Put her in there, disappear from her sight for few minutes, come back to let her out again. She is calm for few seconds but soon starts to bite again. So then I repeat like 5 times but same thing. How long should I expect to repeat this until I see some progress?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top