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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As I'm still exploring the idea of a third dog and I'm off tomorrow and have time to actually meet some dogs, I'm curious what the people on here would recommend for me.

Size: 30-40 lbs max and preferably a lot less than that. Any bigger and the dog becomes difficult to transport in my car as it becomes difficult to put a large crate in there. The biggest thing is that my fence is only 4 ft high and the dog must not be able to escape.

Coat: I'm not particular about color. Zero being a cocker spaniel has to be professionally groomed a couple of times a year. I'd like to avoid having to do this with another dog. I don't mind brushing the dog on a regular basis, but would like to avoid professional grooming.

Trainability - The dog must be trainable. This is a must. I am tired of beating my head against a wall dealing with Brutus and then have him look at me and say, "I think I know a better way to fix that wall." I don't have the patience to deal with this for the next 8-10 years. It would drive me to drink and possibly worse. I'd be sitting in the bar going, "Yeah, so your wife left you for another woman and then decided to become a man. I've been trying to teach my dog to sit for 5 years."

Temperament - I know what I'm looking for temperament wise and I really believe I can find it in just about any breed. I basically want a laid back dog who prefers to lounge around.

I'm probably going the rescue route again as I don't have the time or the patience to deal with a puppy. I have contacted a sharpei breeder though to see if they have any older dogs they're looking to rehome. So, what would you guys recommend?
 

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I'm afraid I'm most familiar with the non-shedding types that are all high-grooming maintenance. (I'm allergic to the shedders.) I would just go to the shelter(s) and try to evaluate personalities. Maybe bring some treats with you to see if you can teach sit during the visit. :)

Good luck! Can't wait to hear how your search progresses.
 

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Personally if you are not all about a specific breed, I would say "head down to the local shelter and start trying out personalities." There are probably several mixes that would fit your needs exactly. If you are really wanting a purebred, check to see which pure bred rescues are active in your area.

Not for nothing but... It took me about 5 minutes to teach Carsten a very reliable "sit" and he is VERY easy going. :) Might want to get a different car and think about a Rottie. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
A rottie would easily jump my 4 foot fence I'm afraid. Plus, we all know they're mean, evil and live to kill people right? :)
 

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I have the perfect 18-pound oversized MinPin that would suit you down to the ground--just ask me! Say the word and I'll dangle a bag of food around his neck, stick a stamp on his nose, and balance him on top of the mailbox for tomorrow's pick up! ;)

Seriously, if you have some specific requirements in terms of energy requirements you might want to give us a better idea. I really like terriers, so my recommendations would be in the terrier group (standard Manchester, standard Rat Terrier) or maybe even a German Pinscher--but I don't really know what your requirements are and those breeds aren't for everyone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I got conned into owning a terrier mix once before and swore I would never do it again. I'm looking for a laid back, low or lower energy dog.
 

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A rottie would easily jump my 4 foot fence I'm afraid.
There are darned few breeds that can be contained by a 4-footer if they really want out. And most of those appear to have above normal grooming needs. I'd concentrate mostly on the "trainability" requirement. Many dogs can be trained to respect boundaries that present no genuine obstacle to escape.

F'rinstance: my SiL has a Pug x Beagle mix, and she is having a helluva time containing him inside a 6-foot stockade fence. The dog is like some kind of idiot savant*. He has a one-track mind, and it is entirely focused on getting out of the yard. There just doesn't seem to be much else going on in there. The dog is overweight and barely able to jump up on the couch, but he sure can identify any weakness in the perimeter security.

*Personally, I don't think the dog is stupid. He is stubborn, but that's not the same thing. He has settled on his priorities, though.
 

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A rottie would easily jump my 4 foot fence I'm afraid. Plus, we all know they're mean, evil and live to kill people right? :)
Well the second part might be true but my boys are happily contained in a 4 foot fence. Teaching boundaries is important. There is even a rodent sized dog that runs all over the place in the adjoining yard and gets the boys real whipped up but they do not go over the fence.
My girl, Lulu, did a few times but she just did it to prove to the neighbor that she could. ha ha She jumped back and forth about 4 times in a row and then never did it again. We were both standing right there watching her. She was also easily contained in the fence after that.

There are darned few breeds that can be contained by a 4-footer if they really want out. And most of those appear to have above normal grooming needs. I'd concentrate mostly on the "trainability" requirement. Many dogs can be trained to respect boundaries that present no genuine obstacle to escape.

F'rinstance: my SiL has a Pug x Beagle mix, and she is having a helluva time containing him inside a 6-foot stockade fence. The dog is like some kind of idiot savant*. He has a one-track mind, and it is entirely focused on getting out of the yard. There just doesn't seem to be much else going on in there. The dog is overweight and barely able to jump up on the couch, but he sure can identify any weakness in the perimeter security.

*Personally, I don't think the dog is stupid. He is stubborn, but that's not the same thing. He has settled on his priorities, though
LOL That had me cracking up! I know exactly what you mean though. My friend has a Boston that gets out constantly and the dog is just as dull as any dog I have ever met. That is a 6 foot privacy fence too. He may be cute but he is not the sharpest knife in the knife rack. LOL


Oh I just wanted to add. Did you ever give thought to a retired Greyhound? You could never let them off leash but they are wonderful and usually easy going pets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
There are darned few breeds that can be contained by a 4-footer if they really want out. And most of those appear to have above normal grooming needs. I'd concentrate mostly on the "trainability" requirement. Many dogs can be trained to respect boundaries that present no genuine obstacle to escape.

F'rinstance: my SiL has a Pug x Beagle mix, and she is having a helluva time containing him inside a 6-foot stockade fence. The dog is like some kind of idiot savant*. He has a one-track mind, and it is entirely focused on getting out of the yard. There just doesn't seem to be much else going on in there. The dog is overweight and barely able to jump up on the couch, but he sure can identify any weakness in the perimeter security.

*Personally, I don't think the dog is stupid. He is stubborn, but that's not the same thing. He has settled on his priorities, though.
Zero is a 15 lb cocker spaniel and I've never had any problem with him. He is a pretty sharp guy so I'm sure he could figure out a way out if he really wanted to. Brutus is a basset so I would be shocked to see him get over a four foot barrier. I have seen him get out one time and that was when he discovered that shaking the gate repeatedly would cause it to open. I replicated this only by shaking the gate 30-40 times over a 3-5 minute span. I'm sure it took him longer. He is extremely persistent.
 

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My cocker bitch can get out of 4' fences as long as it isn't planks of upright wood with no spacing. Can climb all baby gates, chain link, x pens, and if the side of the wood fence she's on has any cross beams she is also out..

My cocker boy on the other hand is contained within 14" of precarious plywood to keep him from leaving rooms..
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Can you elaborate on "low-energy"? How long do you walk Zero now?
20-30 mins a day in the evenings as it's over 100 degrees during the day. Usually we walk every other day as I take Brutus on the other days. On the weekends we may walk an hour or so.
 

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I have the perfect 18-pound oversized MinPin that would suit you down to the ground--just ask me! Say the word and I'll dangle a bag of food around his neck, stick a stamp on his nose, and balance him on top of the mailbox for tomorrow's pick up! ;)
A MiniPin would clear that 4-foot fence with room to spare.

What about a Whippet?
 

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All the whippets I know are supreme escape artists actually.. and I know quite a few through sighthound racing these days. 4 ft fence might hold some of them, but its a chance I wouldn't take.
 

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The Shar Pei probably does fit your energy level, actually. They're pretty laid-back. I haven't met a particularly motivated one, either, so the 4' fence probably wouldn't be an issue. I realize there are individual exceptions to everything I'm saying about this breed in general right now.

The Greyhound might warrant a thought.

If it were me I'd just go down to the shelter and start looking at dogs. Or start flipping through Petfinder to see what descriptions sounded like what I wanted.

You might want to focus on an older dog, too...is five or six years old too old?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Alright, not just because I'm biased or anything, but I'm sure there's some corgis near you needing good homes :D
I had a corgi/terrier mix one time and we so did not get along. I could walk that dog for 2-3 hours a day and he still had a ton of energy to burn. To say we had a personality conflict would be putting it mildly. I just don't have the energy to keep up with a high energy herding breed. I know they're great for some people, but they're just not for me. I'm an introvert who spends his time at home laying around and walks around with his dogs in the evening. A corgi just not for me.

No, I'm not opposed to 6 or 7 yr old dogs as long as they're healthy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Our local humane society currently has these guys. I'm wary of terriers and I'm not sure a pug would do well outside all day which is where Zero usually is. Zero's housebreaking is questionable at best so he's usually outside all day or crated in inclement weather.
 

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The ones that stood out to me as potential choices were...

Rebel, the 6 y/o Corgi (probably not as high-energy as a younger herder? Definitely needs a weight loss program though)
Angelo, the 4 y/o Rat Terrier
Nubert, the 7 y/o Shiba

Maybe you could go down and meet these dogs?
 
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