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i've never had a dog that doesn't like treats, but roscoe turns his nose up at them. i've tried nearly every milk bone product, cheese cubes, and hot dogs and no luck. i'm trying to teach him to sit and don't know what to do except praise him and love him when he does sit, but i don't think he's getting it. are there any alternate reinforcers aside from treats i can look into as rewards?
 

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Toys? I got these cool toys (from WalMart :eek: ) that make noise when they're moved. B'asia LOVES them and the only time I bring them out is when we're training her. A few tugs on a rope toy might be enough to give him the idea.

Have you tried liver treats? Raw hamburger?
 

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Toys? I got these cool toys (from WalMart :eek: ) that make noise when they're moved. B'asia LOVES them and the only time I bring them out is when we're training her. A few tugs on a rope toy might be enough to give him the idea.

Have you tried liver treats? Raw hamburger?
as far as i have found he doesn't play with toys either, but i may not have found the right one yet. i'll check out the noise ones though!
 

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My #1 reward is a tennis ball besides food treats. My dog will stand on his head for a chance to chase the ball. Sometimes squeaky toys or stuffed toys are favorites.
But, rethink the food.....I've never know a dog that wasn't motivated toward food after missing a meal. Obedience classes often tell thier students to not feed the dog until after class and/or reduce their meals considerably the day of class.
 

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It can be anything. After reading a recent thread about "shake", I took to teaching one of my dogs to do that. Coco (F-Malamute). She does high value treats to a minimum level even indoors. She gets bored after a couple of repetitions. BUT, last night she was having a hard time with an ear itch. I did my duty and got up to go scratch inside her ear for her. She LOVED it. When I stopped she pawed at me vigorously to continue. So, being that it was extremely rewarding and being that she offered the desired behavior for the reward, I used a waxy ear scratch to teach "shake". I should have thought of it long ago, she's the only one who thoroughly enjoys ear cleaning day.

Moral of the story: Just observe your dogs reactions to everything and find their vice.
 

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It can be anything. After reading a recent thread about "shake", I took to teaching one of my dogs to do that. Coco (F-Malamute). She does high value treats to a minimum level even indoors. She gets bored after a couple of repetitions. BUT, last night she was having a hard time with an ear itch. I did my duty and got up to go scratch inside her ear for her. She LOVED it. When I stopped she pawed at me vigorously to continue. So, being that it was extremely rewarding and being that she offered the desired behavior for the reward, I used a waxy ear scratch to teach "shake". I should have thought of it long ago, she's the only one who thoroughly enjoys ear cleaning day.

Moral of the story: Just observe your dogs reactions to everything and find their vice.
the ear scratching thing is actually not a bad idea. i've noticed roscoe likes it more than most dogs (may be because of his ear infection, i don't know) but i will try that!
 

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Food is a primary reinforcer so if he's a bit hungry and not too distracted by the world in general and still won't accept yummies like hotdogs (sliced, sprinkled with garlic powder and nuked for 45 seconds) he may be feeling uncomfortable with something in his environment or even with Your body language or position.

The only reason I say this is I have known some dogs that are very "space" sensitive and head shy..when first working with them getting a sit was hard because the lure of the food involved ME (and my almost six foot tall body) moving over their "head space"..I would get the sit but often they would turn their heads away from me, shuffle back a bit before the sit happened and not be interested in the food (a head turnaway is a calming signal and shows some discomfort with proximity). Once I tried a couple of different positions where there was not a lot of eye contact (dog beside me instead of in front, me sitting down instead of standing) the work progressed much more quickly.

Just something to investigate..what are his reactions to your body positions?
 

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My parents made steaks for Memorial Day and gave me the leftovers. Basically it's all fat cut from around the edges that people didn't eat. I put my dog in a down and tossed him a piece ever minute or so. He was riveted in that down and would not move for anything.
 

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Have you ever heard of the book When Pigs Fly, Training Success With Impossible Dogs? I think you might find that book very helpful. Its about training dogs who aren't really motivated by normal reward (like food).

You can use things like being able to sniff a patch of grass, going through a doorway, getting dinner, coming indoors or going outdoors and many more things as rewards.
 
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