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Discussion Starter #1
Hello.
I'll be having a litter of pitskys born. And I was wondering if it's over stepping to ask potential adopters to provide a letter from their landlords?
Ive seen a lot lately of people sneaking puppies into their homes that they rent, than getting in trouble because they didnt say anything to the landlord.
Also seen lots of pets getting rehomed due to apartment living.

I want the puppies to go to responsible owners.
But I know many people don't think twice to ask where the puppy is going, what life they can provide the puppy, ect.
I also know most people dont think twice to see parents of the puppies, which I also have learned and dont agree with, as owner of the Litter, I feel its important to include who the parents are, and be open to any potential adopters meeting the parents and even encourage it, may require it, so they have an idea what they are getting themselves into.
 

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I absolutely think you should get some kind of confirmation that the landlord/rental management company allows dogs, but also specifically allows larger dogs, huskies, and pit bulls. When I was living in the Boston area several years back, apartments with a weight limit over about 20-30lbs was rare, huskies were banned by many and pit bulls (and mixes thereof) were banned by almost all (it's difficult to find an insurance company that will cover pit bulls as part of their standard package, and some won't do it at all - it's not right or fair but it's a reality).

Part of being a responsible breeder is absolutely screening potential owners and making sure they're both good, responsible, caring pet owners in general and a good fit for the puppies you're producing, so you're definitely doing the right thing on that account! Some interested parties will likely be put off by it, but it's the right thing to do.
 

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I absolutely think you should get some kind of confirmation that the landlord/rental management company allows dogs, but also specifically allows larger dogs, huskies, and pit bulls. When I was living in the Boston area several years back, apartments with a weight limit over about 20-30lbs was rare, huskies were banned by many and pit bulls (and mixes thereof) were banned by almost all (it's difficult to find an insurance company that will cover pit bulls as part of their standard package, and some won't do it at all - it's not right or fair but it's a reality).

Part of being a responsible breeder is absolutely screening potential owners and making sure they're both good, responsible, caring pet owners in general and a good fit for the puppies you're producing, so you're definitely doing the right thing on that account! Some interested parties will likely be put off by it, but it's the right thing to do.
Okay thank you!
I definitely know the struggle with insurance! Those that truely want the puppy will be open with their landlords about it! :) I will start setting up homes for them at about 3 weeks old, to give time to interested parties to get the letter to me and prepare, and if it doesnt work out, to still have time to find them a home!
I have never came across anyone asking for landlord letter/info other than shelters, so didnt want to overstep if it was a common practice.
 

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I agree, if someone is committed to doing right by a puppy they'll understand that you want to confirm they're allowed in their living situation. It's common among responsible purebred and/or working/sport dog breeders to ask for evidence of landlord approval, especially in areas where many rentals are restrictive about pets. Sadly a lot of people who breed for profit only care whether about their buyer's wallet, not their living situation, and a lot of people who wind up with an accidental litter or just have a single litter for the experience just don't do the research to understand why it's necessary.
 

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I agree, if someone is committed to doing right by a puppy they'll understand that you want to confirm they're allowed in their living situation. It's common among responsible purebred and/or working/sport dog breeders to ask for evidence of landlord approval, especially in areas where many rentals are restrictive about pets. Sadly a lot of people who breed for profit only care whether about their buyer's wallet, not their living situation, and a lot of people who wind up with an accidental litter or just have a single litter for the experience just don't do the research to understand why it's necessary.
Speaking of accidental litters!! I think a lot of those would be easily avoided if there was more discussion about females in heat. For a long time I aleays thought it was while the dog bleed and that was that, and reading, apparently so have others. When I had my first dog fixed, the vet charged me and arm and a leg, than scolded me that she was still in heat AFTER he spayed her, he didnt let me know before hand, and i was very confused and he didnt explain anything (he is no longer our vet, dude had very little knowledge of dogs!)
I only recently learned, and I am in my twenties that a females are in heat for around 3 weeks! When my female pitsky went into heat I decided best to read up on the matter. But if I didnt have an intact male, I probably wouldnt have ever thought twice about it tbh
 

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Speaking of accidental litters!! I think a lot of those would be easily avoided if there was more discussion about females in heat. For a long time I aleays thought it was while the dog bleed and that was that, and reading, apparently so have others. When I had my first dog fixed, the vet charged me and arm and a leg, than scolded me that she was still in heat AFTER he spayed her, he didnt let me know before hand, and i was very confused and he didnt explain anything (he is no longer our vet, dude had very little knowledge of dogs!)
I only recently learned, and I am in my twenties that a females are in heat for around 3 weeks! When my female pitsky went into heat I decided best to read up on the matter. But if I didnt have an intact male, I probably wouldnt have ever thought twice about it tbh, and most people wouldnt even then because of the whole "oh she's not bleeding so heat is over". I had already been doing lots and lots of research about litters and puppies and it thankfully came across my mind that I truely didnt know the facts of females heats.
 

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A female's (bitch's) heat lasts (generally) 21 days. For some dogs it is longer. It is not their "period" although they do bleed. Dogs do not menstruate. Humans menstruate.

The heat cycle starts with the dog bleeding. Some females are very clean about this and others not. As the heat cycle progresses the bleeding becomes lighter in color of may become almost clear. This is when the female ovulates and it is during this time that she is receptive to males and can get pregnant. Post ovulation she will again bleed and it will look like normal blood discharge. At some point she will stop bleeding entirely and her heat cycle is over. From the first indication of heat to the last the female cannot be around ANY male dogs.

The issue is that all dogs are different. Some will have a split heat. Some will follow being in heat and unbred with a false pregnancy. Most females cycle every 6 months but some will cycle more often and others less often. You need to be vigilant when you own an unspayed female.

For the entire heat cycle the the female needs to be confined and kept away from male dogs (unless the intention is to breed her). IF you walk the dog off your property, put the dog in a car and take her somewhere and walk her then put her in the car and bring her home. Otherwise stay in your own back yard.. Be sure there are no other dogs and that your dog is secure. If you walk her from your house, any loose males in the area will scent her and follow the scent home and you could end up with a yard full of males whining and waiting for her! Most unpleasant experience.

Another thing: Do not leave her unattended in an outdoor kennel. Dogs have been known to breed through kennels and fences. If there are intact male dogs in the household, be sure the female is crated and behind at least one door when the male is loose and you are there and paying attention. If you leave the house the female must be crated and behind a door and the male(s) must also be crated and behind another door as well. Far better to send any intact males off to boarding if you cannot keep them secure.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
A female's (bitch's) heat lasts (generally) 21 days. For some dogs it is longer. It is not their "period" although they do bleed. Dogs do not menstruate. Humans menstruate.

The heat cycle starts with the dog bleeding. Some females are very clean about this and others not. As the heat cycle progresses the bleeding becomes lighter in color of may become almost clear. This is when the female ovulates and it is during this time that she is receptive to males and can get pregnant. Post ovulation she will again bleed and it will look like normal blood discharge. At some point she will stop bleeding entirely and her heat cycle is over. From the first indication of heat to the last the female cannot be around ANY male dogs.

The issue is that all dogs are different. Some will have a split heat. Some will follow being in heat and unbred with a false pregnancy. Most females cycle every 6 months but some will cycle more often and others less often. You need to be vigilant when you own an unspayed female.

For the entire heat cycle the the female needs to be confined and kept away from male dogs (unless the intention is to breed her). IF you walk the dog off your property, put the dog in a car and take her somewhere and walk her then put her in the car and bring her home. Otherwise stay in your own back yard.. Be sure there are no other dogs and that your dog is secure. If you walk her from your house, any loose males in the area will scent her and follow the scent home and you could end up with a yard full of males whining and waiting for her! Most unpleasant experience.

Another thing: Do not leave her unattended in an outdoor kennel. Dogs have been known to breed through kennels and fences. If there are intact male dogs in the household, be sure the female is crated and behind at least one door when the male is loose and you are there and paying attention. If you leave the house the female must be crated and behind a door and the male(s) must also be crated and behind another door as well. Far better to send any intact males off to boarding if you cannot keep them secure.
I am aware of a this, thank you! ☺
I just theow out there the little bit on lack of knowledge, because I really do think for most people it is the lack of actually knowing ❤
Not sure how/when educating on the subject would be ideal, maybe making some facebook posts and tiktoks would help spread the info 🤔
 
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