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We've now had our dog for two weeks. He is a 2 year old rescue and from what I can tell he is a chihuahua/terrier cross. Normally he is fine with our kids, and he is fine with the day care kids my wife has coming every day. Besides the odd low growl when my kids come near his toys while he's got one, (discussed in my previous post) there has not been an act of aggression. Today, however, he got quite upset at my daughter when she was trying to take off his jacket (its cold here.. very very cold) after he came in from a potty break - an act she has done many times already. Today, he did a little more than nip at her. I can't say it was a full on bite, but definitely more force than a nip. Do you think there is a cause for worry here? I don't want him to bite one of the kids.
 

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It sounds like something must have been different this time. Maybe your daughter was unintentionally rough or something. We have to remember that rescue dogs have been through bad times. Two weeks isn't nearly enough to adjust. Rescue dogs have "buttons" we can push without knowing it. The hard to achieve balance with a rescue is not spoiling them because you feel sorry for them, but at the same time being understanding and cutting them some major slack. I don't think there is a problem at all. It is really remarkable that the dog has handled that much kid interaction at 2 weeks and been good overall.
 

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It's pretty easy to hurt a dog taking off his coat, you could pull fur, twist a leg, etc. I want kabota to tell me when I'm hurting him so I can stop. He normally squeals or growls, but he has "mouthed" me- put his teeth on my hand with the tiniest bit of pressure.

Also, 2 weeks is nothing. 6 weeks is the minimum for settling in. I'd be very wary of letting a new dog free roam in a daycare- and pissed off if my daycare did that. He really should be gated into to a different room. You're setting him up to bite a child.
 

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It's pretty easy to hurt a dog taking off his coat, you could pull fur, twist a leg, etc. I want kabota to tell me when I'm hurting him so I can stop. He normally squeals or growls, but he has "mouthed" me- put his teeth on my hand with the tiniest bit of pressure.

Also, 2 weeks is nothing. 6 weeks is the minimum for settling in. I'd be very wary of letting a new dog free roam in a daycare- and pissed off if my daycare did that. He really should be gated into to a different room. You're setting him up to bite a child.
Agreed. Even static electricity from taking off a coat can startle a dog. Give the dog time, CAREFULLY supervised interaction with ONLY your own children and I don't know if it was mentioned elsewhere, but the growling is a resource thing (Hey, my toy!) and you will want to take the time to teach the dog that having people around his toys is a good thing (training tips are in the "resource guarding" sticky and elsewhere with those key words + "trading game" as another term to search).

Never punish a growl, but rather seek to fix the reason the dog feels he needs to growl (a form of communication)

Please don't allow a dog of any size, breed or time in your house around children that are there for formal (a business) daycare. That may even be a violation of the law depending on how daycares are licensed and inspected in your area. If you mean she babysits say cousins or 1-2 neighbor children, then you want to get permission from their parents and only allow interaction well after this dog has settled in- so minimum of 6 weeks but really, it can take a rescue 3-4 months to completely settle in. Even then, it should be well supervised which means enough adults around who are watching the kids and dog (not reading a book, not watching some kids while others play with the dog, not preparing lunch etc)

If this is a small dog especially, this is equally for the dog's safety as it is for the children's safety. As I am sure you know, children can be rough and clumsy and it is easy to hurt a smaller dog accidentally. And a hurt dog is liable to bite as a pain reaction (like you shoving away someone that slapped you). Then you have a double dose of problems. Even a larger dog can get poked in the eyes or the nose or tripped over and hurt.
 
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