Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just got a little golden puppy and I am completely overwhelmed. What is most important for me as a pet owner to focus on? (Training the dog? keeping it healthy? making sure he isn't lonely?) please help
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
Yikes, I don't know where to start. I've had dogs my whole life and currently have a puppy, but I'm no expert. I'm sure others can give you more detailed advice, and you can search throughout the forum for information on each topic.

#1 Health
Where did your get your pup (breeder, rescue, etc.)? They should have given you some health history, but I always play it safe and take my pup to the vet immediately. The pup will need to be vaccinated.

#2 Training
We immediately enrolled our pup in "puppy preschool". They do some basic commands but it's extremely helpful with socialization. Socializing a puppy to new places, people and dogs and at young age is very important. But, be cautious until your pup has been fully vaccinated (around 4 months). Housetraining should probably be one of your first priorities. I would also highly recommend crate training. There's tons of information on this site regarding training.

There's so much more! I would suggest focusing on a particular topic and searching on the forum or asking a specific question. If you enroll in training your trainer can also provide guidance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,018 Posts
In my opinion at first the most important thing is bonding. Make sure to take some time to start developing a bond with your dog and it will make things in the future a lot easier. I'd also start being consistent with house rules, etc and enforcing appropriate behavior.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
In my opinion at first the most important thing is bonding. Make sure to take some time to start developing a bond with your dog and it will make things in the future a lot easier. I'd also start being consistent with house rules, etc and enforcing appropriate behavior.
is there a specific tool that can help me?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
The advice given thus far is basic, but essential. I agree with having your dog checked out by a good vet. Regular visits, to include vaccinations, will help deal with and solve a lot a potential problems later on.

All dogs look for love and attention--as much so as they give in return. This is the beginning of the bonding you need to develop. Actually, setting the "house" rules is a part of that bonding. You need to let your dog know what is allowed and what isn't. In contrast to that, your dog should have a "king's X" or "safe" space where they know they won't be bothered. Often this area will be where their prime bedding is located . . . they can sleep most anywhere, but will have one favorite spot. If the furniture is off limits, they need to know that area is not appropriate for them. So, for some of your bonding activity, you will also be training your dog.

As was previously stated by another member, training is essential, and it can be a laborious and time consuming task. Train your dog well early, and you'll reap tons of love and companionship over the years. Failing to adequately train your dog early will give both of you pain and anguish.

Dogs are, in my humble opinion, 100% unconditional love, when you show them you love them too. They tend to give back far more than they receive . . . so, give a lot to your puppy now, and then enjoy the rewards of lots of love back over the years.

Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Having fun with the pup.
There are no good vets in your area. I guarantee it. They're all on the take. Skip it unless you have an emergency.
Crate train the puppy but it is more important to have fun than to train obedience. My two year old kids learned the ABC's and letter sounds but they could have waited until Kindergarten and they wouldnt' have been any "dumber"
The training you need to do is simply setting your authority/leadership with the pup which has nothing to do with obedience commands and neither is it greivous. It has to do with simple things like showing your pup that you are its source of food, potty relief, fun, play and direction in all things.

So:

Food, water, fun

wow I was going to write a book and sell it for $14.95 but I guess I ran out of advice too soon. I'll have to invent some nonsense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,018 Posts
is there a specific tool that can help me?
What do you mean by 'tool'? Just get your dog and spend the first while developing basic manners and potty training, etc, while being sure to take some time to have fun with it and build up a relationship with it.

There are no good vets in your area. I guarantee it. They're all on the take. Skip it unless you have an emergency.
Bad idea. It is best to have a vet check over any new dog or puppy soon after getting them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,415 Posts
Consistency.
Reward behavior that you want. Ignore or redirect behavior that you don't want.
Get all vaccinations on schedule. Don't take puppy where other dogs may have been until fully vaccinated. (This is the most important thing, to me. You can't do any training/bonding with a dead dog).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,108 Posts
My two favorite puppy books for the new pet owner are Ian Dunbar's Before and After You Get Your Puppy and Patricia McConnell's The Puppy Primer. McConnell's book just came out in a new edition so it's very up-to-date and not only is she brilliant, she's a very enjoyable writer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,615 Posts
Having fun with the pup.
There are no good vets in your area. I guarantee it. They're all on the take. Skip it unless you have an emergency
.

What sort of bs advice is this?
Yes you need to LOOK for a good vet, but skipping puppy vaccines and exams is not a good idea. I have met vets that did focus on money, but MOST go into veterinary care because they love animals. This is quite simply, insulting. But then you are the same guy who told someone they should "get rid of a dog" if it nips at people. No grey areas obviously, your world.

Back to the OP.
Puppies ARE overwhelming. Just like having a new baby in the house....lots to learn lots to worry about..and lots of work. But it is SO worth it.

Health: a general physical exam and vaccine booster and fecal check. You don't mention how old the pup is or whether it has had a puppy vaccine administered by the breeder so a lot depends on his age and what has been done already. Making sure the pup is healthy in the first place sets you up to succeed in other areas.

Training: Housetraining is the number one to start with..but you can start teaching a young pup LOTS of stuff right away. They are little sponges, but understanding their physical and mental limits (short sessions, lots of rewards and lots of REST) will keep learning fun for the pup.

Socialization and bonding: proper socialization involves introducing pup in short sessions to many different people, places and things. This means people of different ages (especially children), sexes, ethnicities and extends to beards, umbrellas, wheelchairs, bicycles, sunglasses, big coats, hats etc. Dogs SEE differently than we do, so they may recognize you in your everyday wear but in a big winter coat, with a hat etc can be startling. Proper socialization also involves introductions to mature, calm, well socialized and puppy tolerant adult dogs and the occasional puppy (hence puppy classes). Introductions should be positive and carefully monitored.
Bite inhibition: puppies use their mouths to explore the world. Teaching early on that human skin is tender is important. There are stickies in the training sections...read them, they're helpful.

All in all the most important thing, IMO is YOU learning canine body language signals and learning to communicate to your dog that you are safe, that you will KEEP him safe and that you are the giver of all things good.

Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,415 Posts
.
There are no good vets in your area. I guarantee it. They're all on the take. Skip it unless you have an emergency.


Boy, that's a really irresponsible, ignorant remark to make to a new pet owner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
526 Posts
.
There are no good vets in your area. I guarantee it. They're all on the take. Skip it unless you have an emergency.


Boy, that's a really irresponsible, ignorant remark to make to a new pet owner.
I know I'm new here, but I have to admit that answer pretty much horrified me. I'm a firm believer in seeing a vet regularly in order to have a relatonship, get proper vaccinations, and build a sort of portfolio so that when something is out of the ordinary it's quicker to be noticed. Anyone who gets a puppy or a dog should take the dog in ASAP for vaccinations (if needed) and to introduce the dog to the vet. It's also good for socialization and to make the dog not scared to the vet. In fact, it can be a good idea to stop into the vet periodically just to say hi so that the dog doesn't associate the vet with its being a really bad place.

Someone mentioned Ian Dunbar's After You Get Your Puppy and I second that suggestion! You can begin training NOW. Socialization is also very important and Dunbar gives a good outline for how to go about that.

Bonding is super important. I just read a great book called Bonding With Your Dog by Victoria Schade. Super book with a lot of ideas on how to bond! For me, it involves a lot of time spend playing with the dog, giving belly rubs, and taking long walks. I try to find out what makes the dog tick: what does he/she seem to love above all othe things (fetch, tug, etc.).

And mostly, ENJOY! Don't get overly frustrated because puppies CAN be frustrating.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top