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Discussion Starter #1
So, I have been thinking about getting a second dog in the next year or two but don't know what kind. I'm sure I will check out the shelters first, but just for fun I like to think about dog breeds as well. I have a brittany spaniel now who is surprisingly very laid back when she gets her walks and play time.

So, what kind of dogs are known for being couch potatoes? Small to medium size? Easy to train?

That's what I want! :)

Thanks!
 

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When you say "couch potato," what exactly do you mean? Less energetic than your Brittany, or equal to? Brittanys are pretty high-energy dogs if I recall.
 

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One possibility, although not a small to medium size, would be a Greyhound (perhaps a retired racer). As long as they get the opportunity to run full out in a securely fenced area regularly, they are couch potatoes the rest of the time.
 

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So, I have been thinking about getting a second dog in the next year or two but don't know what kind. I'm sure I will check out the shelters first, but just for fun I like to think about dog breeds as well. I have a brittany spaniel now who is surprisingly very laid back when she gets her walks and play time.

So, what kind of dogs are known for being couch potatoes? Small to medium size? Easy to train?

That's what I want! :)

Thanks!
Basset Hounds are known to be couch potatoes. Here's a website that gives decent rankings of each breed on a variety of characteristics, including energy level.
http://dogtime.com/dog-breeds/characteristic/energy-level
 

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Bassets may be known for being couch potatoes, but it's a terribly incorrect reputation, as anyone who's ever walked out behind them on a hunt knows! :p

"Couch potato" can have such a varied definition. My Mal is a couch potato, but his sister is pretty active. (And Mal is happier with a good walk or two each day, but not obnoxious.) Most of the sighthounds CAN be couchpotato-ish, but you've also got a lot of the toy breeds who have really moderate energy levels because they get plenty of exercise running from room to room even in a small space. And there ARE a lot of breeds that are normally moderate energy (I would put corgis, collies, BMDs, retrievers (once you get past the crazy puppy phase), pitties, and some of the spaniels in this catagory.)

And lastly, you've got breeds where the likelihood of finding a laid back individual is VERY low and unless you're considering seniors, you shouldn't consider those breeds. (My list for this group would be BCs, ACDs, the Northern Breeds, and quite a few (but not all) of the terriers.)
 

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Whippets are medium sized, clean, easy going sofa hounds. Mine acts like he's on a valium drip all the time, and has since he was a tiny puppy. He is the best dog I ever had. "Push button" dog, and "living art" are a couple of good ways to describe him ;)
 

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I don't know that there are any breeds who are more inclined to be lazy than others. It's a personality thing with the individual dog. Believe me, I have met my share of hyperactive basset hounds. I have one now who's pretty active and likes to walk for 30-45 mins a day despite the fact that he's 10 yrs old. Go to the local shelter and meet some individual dogs.
 

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Greyhounds are the official dog of the LazyBoy Chair Company (well, maybe not; I just made that up, but it is apt). A couple of good 30-45 minute walks each day or a chance to sprint around for 15 minutes and they are good-to-loaf. Only two concerns are 1) always muzzle them in public because they might chase down anything that runs and 2) limit exposure to cold weather (sweater in anything below 45 degrees or so). They generally get along very well with other dogs.
 

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Greyhounds are definitely lazy too. Most SHs are.

Whippets are pretty easy to train off leash if that's important to you. Greyhounds are tougher here, IMO probably because they haven't been conditioned to it from 8 weeks of age, where as the other breeds you usually adopt as a tiny new puppy and can work with from day one.

I have had several of each- two of my Grey fosters were fabulous off leash. The rest ranged from "okay in the middle of the forest" to "NEVER anywhere"
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the great tips! I grew up with two italian greyhounds, and they were great dogs, I don't know why that didn't cross my mind before, but they were hard to train. Whippits sound great too, beautiful dogs. And, I have always loved those Basset's ears!
 

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Bassets are hard to train too. Believe me, I've all but given up on mine. I think he knows what he's supposed to do and just doesn't do it. Remember that hounds are bred to work separate from humans.
 

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Whippets are not like IGs- much MUCH easier to housebreak, less barky, and calmer. I adore IGs, but the breakability and the house training difficulties scare me with them. They're so sweet though.
 

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If you are looking for a laid back dog then you might want to look to the companion group. The UKC has a companion group and the list can be found at:

http://www.dogscapade.com/dog-breeds/ukc-companion-dogs/

Now if you are looking for a medium sized couch potato then the English Bulldog is a real couch potato.
I've run into bulldogs who were hyperactive and excited too. It's all about the individual dog. My brother and I have the same parents and were raised in the same environment yet my brother is very, very active and I'm a couch potato. My sister is also pretty active. Dogs are the same way. I met a litter of basset hound pups once where several of them seemed very active and 2 or 3 of them were more laid back. They had the same parents and totally different temperaments. I think if you want a laid back dog, you really have to get out and meet individual dogs.
 

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I agree with hulkamaniac. Not all of a certian breed will be 100% the same. Also for size, too. There are toy dogs who are lazy, and others can run all day.
 

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Only two concerns are 1) always muzzle them in public because they might chase down anything that runs and 2) limit exposure to cold weather (sweater in anything below 45 degrees or so).
Uh....whaaaaaaa???????

Greyhounds should be kept on a leash and most adoption groups require you to agree to that. The leash will prevent them from running off and NO muzzle is necessary in public.

The sweater comment is debatable. But not worth it b/c if someone wants to put a sweater on their dog under 45 degrees...go ahead.
 

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Uh, yeah... I put track kennel muzzles on Greyhounds to free run them at dog parks where small dogs are, until I KNOW that foster dog 100% won't play too rough or play chase and bite. But, ehhh... they do not need muzzles in public if leashed or even at the dog park if small dog safe.
 
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