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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve posted here before. Only it’s getting worse. Our french bulldog is nearly 10 months old. However he’s always been bitey with us. We have tried to nip it in the bud since day one. He is getting worse. He has gone for my sons face twice when he’s been sat on his phone on the sofa? People tell us that he’s trying to get his attention? Although it seems more than that to me? Am I wrong? We can’t sit on the sofa without him jumping and running all over us. He’s chewed all my garden furniture and shredded every single cushion. He keeps peeing over my baby’s toy basket. He’s chewed all my spindles on my stairs. The list is endless. Nothing seems to be teaching him. It’s making me so miserable. He constantly jumps up and barks at me and my children when we go near my partner or if he hugs us. Is this normal behaviour or have we got a problem on our hands? Thanks
 

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If you're confused about what is normal puppy behavior and what is truly an aggressive dog, you should consider bringing in a professional, positive reinforcement trainer. We're a bunch of people on the internet and can't actually see what is going on. We can only guess. It sounds like normal behavior to me, but if you're still struggling with the behaviors you mentioned 3 months ago, it might be time to bring in someone who can show you what you need to do in person.
 

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I agree a professional is needed in this case.

I can't say this isn't behavior I haven't seen with Frenchies before. I have even struggled to find the line where play stops and aggression begins when they behave like this. As always, it is pretty much entirely from backyard bred Frenchies. With the sudden spike in popularity there has been a flood of breeders with low standards producing them. When behaviors are due to poor breeding they are genetic, you can absolutely train a dog with genetic behavioral issues but you have to adjust expectations accordingly. I hope a behaviorist can shed some light on the situation.
 

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My sister and her husband’s French bulldog acts very similar. She is almost 2 years old and has not been able to learn any commands and is constantly running around biting everything in sight. Unfortunately, the dog was the result of backyard breeding (they found out after the fact) and sadly she’s now heavily medicated because she has a ton of medical problems including epilepsy, chronic nerve pain, urinary incontinence from her bladder not forming right and per their vet neurologist her tail is growing inside her body pressing on her spine?

It’s so sad breeders are getting away with this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
My sister and her husband’s French bulldog acts very similar. She is almost 2 years old and has not been able to learn any commands and is constantly running around biting everything in sight. Unfortunately, the dog was the result of backyard breeding (they found out after the fact) and sadly she’s now heavily medicated because she has a ton of medical problems including epilepsy, chronic nerve pain, urinary incontinence from her bladder not forming right and per their vet neurologist her tail is growing inside her body pressing on her spine?

It’s so sad breeders are getting away with this.
Thanks for the reply. Yes it’s terrible isn’t it. How did they find out it was a backyard breeder? Tbh I’m not sure how much more I can take.
 

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Thanks for the reply. Yes it’s terrible isn’t it. How did they find out it was a backyard breeder? Tbh I’m not sure how much more I can take.
They didn’t understand what you need to do to go through a reputable breeder. The puppies never saw a vet and had no records, the breeder offered no medical help (which obviously they needed as in addition to the conditions I listed the poor dog was full of parasites and almost died), etc... The biggest red flag was the cost. They though they got an amazing deal at $800 so I think they saw a cheap Frenchie and jumped on adopting her without really doing their research.
 

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Thanks for the reply. Yes it’s terrible isn’t it. How did they find out it was a backyard breeder? Tbh I’m not sure how much more I can take.
The average person thinks good breeders care about their dogs while bad breeders don't and mistreat them. This isn't the case, likely most BYBs love their dogs like any family pet would be loved, but the issue is they are not invested in the breed or producing above average dogs.

The three basic proofs of ethical breeding is
1. Registration with a legitimate kennel club. (AKC, UKC etc)
2. Breed specific health screening (OFAs are suggested on all breeds, some dogs are prone to sight, hearing, heart issues etc and there are ways to test these defects. There are also great genetic panels available too)
3. Breeding goal. (If working, then proof the dog can work. If sports, then titles in the sports the dogs are in. If show, then titles in conformation. If pet then there should be clear stellar temperaments and they should still be within the breed standard.)

Those three things are just the simplified way to explain ethical breeding, there are of course other steps. Owner contracts, proper husbandry, wise selective breeding, pulling subpar dogs from the program, being willing to take a dog back any time for any reason, etc etc. There is a lot to ethical breeding, especially when the goal is to better the breed. These aren't things a typical person is going to think about when looking for a puppy to buy, unfortunately.
 

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I'm not here very often, so this is the 1st i've heard of your troubles. But as I was reading I couldn't help but wonder Is he resource guarding? The sofa, your kids and yourself?

I'm not a trained behavioralist but if any of the regulars think so too, i'm sure they have some advice for resource guarding. If you think it could be a possibility, I think I would not allow him on the furniture. The idea is to take the resource away they are guarding. When he growls at your partner, you take him out the room for a couple minutes. Like I said, i'm not a professional, but I know a couple things about resource guarding. Usually when 'attacks' are out of blue like in the case with your son just sitting on the sofa, it's the sofa or where ever that person is that they are guarding.

Also bear in mind, usually they will send out signals that they are uncomfortable, little ones that often get missed before a snap or bite. We really really don't want a bite, so it's important to learn about these signals and heed them. But if there's no warnings, it's mostly likely guarding behaviour.

He is chewing up your stuff, when does this happen? When you are gone from the house?
 

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I was about to get a trainner in on or dog however, he calmed down a lot and we have lots of play toys for im that may help you.
 
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