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Discussion Starter #1
Hello!

I've spent the last hour or two trying to find out what breed this dog is. Here are two pics:





Some kind of sled dog?
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Awww, nice :) just love these dogs, a friend of mine got a white siberian husky, cute :)

Got any pic of yours?

And thx for the reply btw.. :)
 

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that would be a siberian husky, proud owner of 3 here
I was going to guess American Eskimo but you probably would know better than I would. How can you tell it's a Siberian Husky and not an AE?
 

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I was going to guess American Eskimo but you probably would know better than I would. How can you tell it's a Siberian Husky and not an AE?
Well, it's very obviously not an AED because the coat is a medium-length plush coat with no feathering. :p

But I'm not entirely sure it's a Sibe either - if I saw this dog in a photo with no other context, I would probably label it as an Alaskan Husky or a husky mix. The face is awfully square and the expression isn't Husky-like.

ETA: that's two different dogs. The first is definitely a husky. The second I still think is a mix or a very unusual husky (not because of the color and eyes, which are very common, but because of the structure.)
 

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They both look like your basic Alaskan sled dogs. Which usually means a mix.....Husky mixed with anything that is furry enough to withstand the cold and strong enough to pull. I think Penny is probably a sled mix. Husky/Pyr/GSP/Keeshond seems like a probable sled mix to me. Beautiful dogs, both of them. The first one could use a good chew bone, though ;) .
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
ETA: that's two different dogs. The first is definitely a husky. The second I still think is a mix or a very unusual husky (not because of the color and eyes, which are very common, but because of the structure.)
Yeah, I can see now, that it's two different dogs, sorry for that - and as far as I can understand, there seems to be different kinds of breeds of these white coated dogs.

The American Eskimo looks more like the one I was looking for.

Are these dogs American Eskimos (for some reason the website won't let me right click on the image, and copy, so here's a link instead)?

http://www.thebubbler.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/223/size/big/

They are very thick coated, and seem like dogs of the Spitz type.
 

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http://www.thebubbler.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/223/size/big/

They are very thick coated, and seem like dogs of the Spitz type.
Those are Samoyeds. They're significantly bigger than the AED, and while they're all in the greater spitz family, they're not terribly closely related to the AED.

AEDs descend from white Pomeranians, German Spitz, and Keeshonden. (My most recent reading on Pom history poitns out that that earliest Pom imports to England were mostly white or black and white dogs about the size of a modern AED or Keesie. Their temperament was NOTABLY different from the later dogs exported from Germany to England- the AED seems to be related to the former more than the later- and the modern German Spitz (mittel and klein and to a lesser degree grosse and zwerg) is somewhere in the middle.

Samoyeds originated in Russia or Siberia. They were a multi-purpose draft dog (in addition to pulling sleds, they herded reindeer and are one of a few breeds in the AKC working group that is allowed to participate in herding trials.) AEDs are significantly smaller, lighter-boned and their faces are different - look at how the muzzle and face is smooth (on the Sam) and then suddenly flares out on the cheeks - the AED (and Pom and GS and Keesie) all have a less pronounced line there. Sammys aren't huge dogs- 23ish" and about 65 pounds - and they're probably the most biddable of the three common northern sled breeds (the other two being Sibe and Malamute.) The AED (and again, the German spitz breeds) are more of a watchdog/alarm dog/companion personality - the Sams are a bit more workmanlike.

Cait (amateur spitz historian ;P)
 

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Ahhh finally, the Samoyeds was what I was really looking for, medium-big, thick- and whited coated. Thank you very much and thanks for the insight! :)

Do you have know if they're difficult to get your hands on? And do they cost? I see they're referred to as Bjelkier in Europe.
 

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Ahhh finally, the Samoyeds was what I was really looking for, medium-big, thick- and whited coated. Thank you very much and thanks for the insight! :)

Do you have know if they're difficult to get your hands on? And do they cost? I see they're referred to as Bjelkier in Europe.
I just did a Yahoo search. Here is the national Samoyed Rescue group:
http://www.samoyedrescue.org/
These are Samoyeds throughout the country who need homes.
You can also try searching on petfinder.com
If you want to learn more about dog breeds, a few good sites are
http://www.yourpurebredpuppy.com/dogbreeds/
http://animal.discovery.com/breedselector/dogselectorindex.do
Or you could try to find a reputable breeder if you don't want to rescue a dog from a shelter/rescue group.

Make sure you're knowledgeable about whatever breed you get before getting a dog. Just getting a dog because it looks pretty without doing your homework is setting yourself up for problems. (I'm not saying by any means that you are doing that; I just want to make sure you aren't.)

Every breed of dog will have some undesirable qualities. You have to decide which "negatives" are ones that you're willing to put up with. For the right dog, it will be well worth it! Here are some about Samoyeds that I got from the 2nd link I posted:
" * Vigorous exercise requirements
* Rowdiness and exuberant jumping, especially when young
* "Separation anxiety" (destructiveness and barking) when left alone too much
* Chasing and nipping at things that move: children, joggers, other animals, bikes, cars
* Stubbornness (mind of his own)
* Heavy shedding
* Barking
There are plenty of adult Samoyeds who have already proven themselves NOT to have negative characteristics. If you find such an adult, don't let "typical breed negatives" worry you.

When you acquire a puppy, you're acquiring potential -- what he one day will be. So "typical breed characteristics" are very important. But when you acquire an adult, you're acquiring what he already IS."
 

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LOL! I hope you're ready for tons of shedding and a dog who is more escape artist then dog! ;-)

Sams are great dogs. However, I'd suggest meeting a few of them before you get your heart set on the breed.

They're very independent and very, very vocal. By vocal I mean that they howl alot.

They're very sturdy dogs, and require alot of socialization and training to become good family pets.

Most samms I've met are friendly, but do take a minute or two to really warm up to you. They're a nice dog, but not exhuberently friendly like a golden retriever.

You will have to devote yourself to jogging or getting involved in agility, or weight pull. These dogs were bred to work, so you have to keep them on their toes, or else they will act out if they are bored.

Definitely not a dog for everyone, then again, that's why there are 1000 breeds out there. :)

If you're in the Ohio area, you should check out the Ohio Samoyed Specialty. It's on May 02 in Bucyrus.
 

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My dad used to have a Sam..... to me the second do does not look like a Sam... hair is to short and the eyes are blue.... I am no expert but it doesn't look like a Sam....
 
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