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Hi, Hope you are all doing well. I am planning to own a Merle French Bulldog, but I am also little confused about their life span.
I need a dog breed, which can spend maximum time with me. I am already very sad due to my Beagle short life span, which
I have just lost in the previous week. Please let me know your thoughts about the Merle French Bulldog life span. I have
read a lot on internet, But I just wanted to get a sincere answer from an owner.
 

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Hi, Hope you are all doing well. I am planning to own a Merle French Bulldog, but I am also little confused about their life span.
I need a dog breed, which can spend maximum time with me. I am already very sad due to my Beagle short life span, which
I have just lost in the previous week. Please let me know your thoughts about the Merle French Bulldog life span. I have
read a lot on internet, But I just wanted to get a sincere answer from an owner.
As with most short snouted dogs, they average 8 -14 yrs, YMMV...
 

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I would be leery of any breeder who breeds for non-standard colors, especially merle,. More importantly though, what health testing is the breeder doing? These are the recommended tests for French Bulldogs:
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Breeding for open nares and proper palates can help with BOAS problems. Surgery to open the nares and/or shorten the palate can be expensive and carries the associated risks. Like any other brachycephalic breed, Frenchies are sensitive to hot temperatures.
 
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Honestly if you are looking for longevity, french bulldogs might not be the best choice as there are quite a few health issues associated with the breed. Add in the merle gene and it complicates things further. So definitely if you go for this, make very sure the parents have all the testing.

I know you do not want a double dose of merle, and honestly if the breeder is using one double merle dog bred to a non- merle to obtain 100% merle puppies, i'd also avoid.

It makes blue merles very expensive and i'm pretty sure you would need to include another breed to get the merle gene, so essentially it is very pricey for a mixed breed mongrel.

Finally a breeder who specializes in color most often won't have the health of the animal in mind. They would be more interested in obtaining an uncommon color than looking to improve the breed as a whole.
 

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Concerning longevity, Schipperke tend to be pretty hardy, long lived little dogs.
 
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