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So I've tried using the various online quizzes/tests that give you results for what your ideal dog breed would be, I'm not concerned about their accuracy or their validity but I'd appreciate a more hands on approach where I can voice my actual habits instead of clicking the best option that sorta kinda i guess matches me.

I won't be getting a dog for at least a year. Within the next 1-3 I hope, and I am already obsessively researching dog breeds to find the perfect one. Needless to say, I'm a planner. I can't even pick out a new tube of mascara without researching it and scouring through reviews, so searching for something such as a dog breed has made me gone slightly stir crazy,

Time to talk about my life style now I guess. I'm 17 so by the time I get a dog I'll probably be 19 or 20, not planning ANY children or any elders to be living with me until I am an elder myself, of course something could happen but taking all variables out, it wont.

No allergies or major health issues that would inhibit me from taking care of the dog.

I will be living in either an apartment or a small house with a yard if I'm lucky, hoping to not need a roommate. An average amount of people will be going in and out.

I would not consider myself an extremely active person but if I have a reason to I will eagerly go out and exercise. For me it's just basically getting myself up and out to go and do it so maybe a stubborn dog? :decision: When indoors I tend to just chill out and will lay around and watch tv or read or crochet.

I love talkative dogs but if i end up living in an apartment my future neighbors would probably appreciate a dog who didn't howl alot.

I have a cat that I plan taking around with me till the day she passes(she's turning 10 this year) so it isn't an option to have a dog with a high prey drive just for the safety of my kitty.

I dont particularly like slobber but I do realize it comes with owning a dog so preferably a dog not known for its slobbers.

Shedding I'm fine with, I'm willing to brush the dog weekly or even a quick run over with a brush daily, but I'd rather not have the dire need to go to the pet salon or whatever they're called to get it's fur all done.

I also love large dogs, like 45 pounds and up which needs to be taken into consideration if I do end up in an apartment building.

I have no problem with training and am guaranteed to spend time training but I am not sure if I could do hours upon hourssss of training simply because I lose motivation.

Hmmm think thats it, ask me any other questions need be but I feel like I considered a decent amount of information, and sorry for the length :grouphug:
 

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Other folks will give you better 'matches,' but I suggest that you go 'research' a real 2 - 5 yo rescue Lab. You can specify a Lab that is good with cats and that lived in an apartment. You can also ask for other behaviors, but an adult Lab is very adaptable to new situations, and very forgiving of new owner mistakes.

A Lab would like a 30 min. walk twice a day, plenty of water to guzzle, a clean kitchen with no accessible food :) , a hard rubber bone and a Kong, and 30 min. of time/training with a loving owner. Sitting and watching TV with you and the cat is adequate.
 

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You're pretty young (not that I should be talking only being 22 and all) but do you plan on going to college?

how are you going to pay for the apartment and dog (not that I'm trying to get too personal I'm just saying paying for rent/vet bills/other expenses like heat, electric, gas *if that's the way they heat the apartment* can get really expensive trust me)? I live paycheck to paycheck (car payment, car insurance, rent, credit card, college debt payments) I pay it all myself and I have a dog, 2 rabbits, and a snake (if there is an emergency and one of the rabbits or Jake breaks a leg or something I have an emergency credit card just for them with a 5000 limit). My mom and family would probably help out too but the majority of everything I pay for. Not trying to be scary or anything but it's a lot of money and if you're going to try to live by yourself then it can be very expensive.

Are you looking for a puppy or an adult?
 

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Are you looking for a purebred or a mix? Purchasing a purebred can be costly. If, like many people I know, you are getting a rescue through petfinder or some other source, then I have to say don't drive yourself crazy with analyzing it. More often than not the dog picks you.
 

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yes I do plan on going to college, and trust me I am definitely thinking about the cost, I'm working right now saving up money and I'll be able to get financial aid from the government which will cut the bill in half. The age doesn't really matter to me
 

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Either one is fine with me. I'm just so anxious to get a dog I want to analyze every dog breed to make sure I find the perfect one for me and me for it.
 

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Most of the 400-or-so recognized breeds were developed for specific purposes. Unless you're planning on hunting wild boar or keeping a flock of sheep, you maybe shouldn't focus too much on specific breeds.

You need to get out and meet some dogs and talk to their owners. Whether you go to dog shows or a dog park, you'll find people who love to talk about their dogs. Maybe visit some shelters and see the dogs. (Contrary to what you may have heard, these dogs are not damaged goods. Sometimes it was the owners that are damaged.)

Dogs, like people, are individuals. For example, some of the nicest dogs I've ever met were labs and Siberians and some of the worst I've met have been labs and Siberians.

Don't let apartment living discourage you from a larger dog. It's not the size of the dwelling that matters but how often the dog gets out of it.

If you have a cat, and don't want to be evicted for noise, do NOT get a Plott hound.

Of the dogs I've had in my life, there was exactly one that I researched and sought out (a beagle when I was 12.) The rest of them just showed up when I needed them.
 

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yes I do plan on going to college, and trust me I am definitely thinking about the cost, I'm working right now saving up money and I'll be able to get financial aid from the government which will cut the bill in half. The age doesn't really matter to me
My point was college takes a lot of time (and money) away from you especially with a job and a dog (I'm not saying these things to be mean or anything I'm just trying to make sure you know that dogs are a huge responsibility *not that I don't believe you can't do it there are a few members on here 17 years old and take full responsibility for their dogs* I'm just saying it's different when you're the one that has to do everything for your dog. :) since you don't care about purebred or mixed or age I would probably go into a shelter and just see which ones stick out to you :)

if you want to go a breeder route maybe an aussie? they are large dogs, they are a herding breed so wouldn't injury your cat intentionally (but keep an eye on them during play time), they aren't particularly loud (unless you're playing with them and they get excited), they aren't bad to groom, they have a medium to medium-high energy. Be careful though some apartments aren't large dog friendly unfortunately :(
 

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I think a Whippet would be a good match for you or a retired Greyhound (I always recommend these, they are so great!) they are both sight hounds but can live quite happily with cats. They are also happy to get out and do things but also love couch time. Neither breed slobbers and they are both low maintenance as far as coat care goes. I think greyhounds are often over looked but they are fabulous dogs.

Bea
 

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My point was college takes a lot of time (and money) away from you especially with a job and a dog (I'm not saying these things to be mean or anything I'm just trying to make sure you know that dogs are a huge responsibility *not that I don't believe you can't do it there are a few members on here 17 years old and take full responsibility for their dogs* I'm just saying it's different when you're the one that has to do everything for your dog. :) since you don't care about purebred or mixed or age I would probably go into a shelter and just see which ones stick out to you :)

if you want to go a breeder route maybe an aussie? they are large dogs, they are a herding breed so wouldn't injury your cat intentionally (but keep an eye on them during play time), they aren't particularly loud (unless you're playing with them and they get excited), they aren't bad to groom, they have a medium to medium-high energy. Be careful though some apartments aren't large dog friendly unfortunately :(
I have an aussie/beagle mix and love love love her. She's 32 lbs thin, 37 lbs when fat. I keep her thin now feeding raw. She definitely loves her people and is only settled when we are all sitting down. Her fur is a cross between beagele and aussie, she's a teddy bear. I'd love another one but you can't clone dogs, or I can't:)
 

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I think a Whippet would be a good match for you or a retired Greyhound (I always recommend these, they are so great!) they are both sight hounds but can live quite happily with cats. They are also happy to get out and do things but also love couch time. Neither breed slobbers and they are both low maintenance as far as coat care goes. I think greyhounds are often over looked but they are fabulous dogs.

Bea

I have a whippet/chihuahua mix and love love love her. She is extremely attached to me. And VERY sensitive. You may want to meet a whippet before you decide on one at your age. I think it depends upon where you live if they are for you. Noises bother her and she is very sensitive digestive-wise.

Have you thought about volunteering/working somewhere you can interact with different breeds? Shelter or kennel?
 

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I would not consider myself an extremely active person but if I have a reason to I will eagerly go out and exercise. For me it's just basically getting myself up and out to go and do it so maybe a stubborn dog? :decision: When indoors I tend to just chill out and will lay around and watch tv or read or crochet....

I have no problem with training and am guaranteed to spend time training but I am not sure if I could do hours upon hourssss of training simply because I lose motivation.
These two points you made make me think you should start with a mellow, adult dog of known temperament. There are PLENTY of dogs who appreciate exercise and can go all day, but are couch potatoes at heart. I don't know you enough to speak for you, but in my experience with people... A stubborn, high energy dog did not create more active owners... Just more frustrated owners. Speaking in very general terms, I think it is best for people to get dogs to match their current lifestyle, not expectations of a future lifestyle.

I don't think age is a limiting factor necessarily... I've seen people give up dogs simply because it was hard to find housing that allowed dogs. And speaking for myself, I got my dog at the age of 16, have moved over six times to many different states within the last 8 years WITH my dog. So some people decide early on that the dog will, to some degree, dictate their lifestyle and others will sacrifice dogs for the sake of lifestyle. If you are the latter, I would suggest waiting until after college before owning a dog and you can still interact with dogs plenty by volunteering at shelters or fostering.

I agree with RonE; I think finding an individual will be a better shot for you than having your heart set on a breed. Your requirements seem very general and I think many dogs in shelters would be happy to live with you.
 

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These two points you made make me think you should start with a mellow, adult dog of known temperament. There are PLENTY of dogs who appreciate exercise and can go all day, but are couch potatoes at heart. I don't know you enough to speak for you, but in my experience with people... A stubborn, high energy dog did not create more active owners... Just more frustrated owners. Speaking in very general terms, I think it is best for people to get dogs to match their current lifestyle, not expectations of a future lifestyle.

I don't think age is a limiting factor necessarily... I've seen people give up dogs simply because it was hard to find housing that allowed dogs. And speaking for myself, I got my dog at the age of 16, have moved over six times to many different states within the last 8 years WITH my dog. So some people decide early on that the dog will, to some degree, dictate their lifestyle and others will sacrifice dogs for the sake of lifestyle. If you are the latter, I would suggest waiting until after college before owning a dog and you can still interact with dogs plenty by volunteering at shelters or fostering.

I agree with RonE; I think finding an individual will be a better shot for you than having your heart set on a breed. Your requirements seem very general and I think many dogs in shelters would be happy to live with you.
But you can find young dogs anywhere. I believe the OP would be best with a puppy. They adapt, mostly, and that's where surrounding yourself with pups will help you decide. Don't lock yourself in to an idea of what having a dog should be.
 

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But you can find young dogs anywhere. I believe the OP would be best with a puppy. They adapt, mostly, and that's where surrounding yourself with pups will help you decide. Don't lock yourself in to an idea of what having a dog should be.
I respectfully disagree. Maybe we've had different experiences, but the MOST common scenario I've seen is high energy puppies not adapting to low attention/exercise lifestyles and then becoming an outdoor dog for the rest of its life around the ~6-12 mo. mark. I am not saying the OP will give the dog a low attention/exercise lifestyle, but simply that some dogs are predisposed to demanding a certain level of stimulation, predisposed to aggression, predisposed to fear... Nurture matters a LOT but a puppy is still a gamble. An adult dog with known temperament can still be young (~1.5+ years). But especially since the OP doesn't care about age, the quickest way for her to get a dog that fulfills her needs is to get an adult.
 

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I respectfully disagree. Maybe we've had different experiences, but the MOST common scenario I've seen is high energy puppies not adapting to low attention/exercise lifestyles and then becoming an outdoor dog for the rest of its life around the ~6-12 mo. mark. I am not saying the OP will give the dog a low attention/exercise lifestyle, but simply that some dogs are predisposed to demanding a certain level of stimulation, predisposed to aggression, predisposed to fear... Nurture matters a LOT but a puppy is still a gamble. An adult dog with known temperament can still be young (~1.5+ years). But especially since the OP doesn't care about age, the quickest way for her to get a dog that fulfills her needs is to get an adult.
I'm sure we have had different experiences so I respectfully disagree. What breeds have you had?

Puppies can be trained. Why would a high energy pup become an outdoor dog? Older dogs can be set in their ways, based upon their own experiences, and that can limit what a new owner can accomplish. But I don't think breed always determines how they conduct themsleves. I think it's a crapshoot no matter what. Don't overanalyze it, unless you are getting a pure bred, then discuss it with the breeder.
 

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I've had just my current dog but I've worked with an animal welfare nonprofit for almost two years, worked with dozens of dogs. I don't claim to know it all, just saying what I've most commonly seen. I think what you said, that older dogs can be set in their ways, can be beneficial to the OP if she finds the right dog. But I agree, overall, with what you're saying. I don't think the OP is unsuitable for a puppy based solely on the information she's given us; I just think an adult dog would be the best and easiest fit. But your points are good ones. I rest my case and wish the OP luck :)
 

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I'm impressed that Indecisive is looking this closely at the details of getting a dog. I got my first puppy at age 40 because she was cute! I got my second puppy because she's the one we could get, Petfinder can be kinda crazy. They have both been a great addition to our life. Best of luck in your journey.
 

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I love how much thought you're putting into this! Reminds me of how I am with big decisions. Research until I turn blue, haha.

You've gotten a lot of good advice, but there's definitely some things I want to add, as someone who's relatively fresh out of college. DEFINITELY wait until you're in school before you get a dog. Evaluate honestly how much time your academics and social activities take, and how much you'd be willing to sacrifice to make room for a dog in your life. As much as I love Samwise? I wouldn't have done well with a dog in undergrad. I was way more involved in certain activities than I'd ever expected (which was awesome! I'd have hated to miss out on most of it), and classes can certainly kick your behind in ways you can't always predict. Senior year especially. In your case, I'd definitely lean towards getting an older dog. Puppies are tons of work, and I say that when we got ours a little older (12 weeks) and I had my fiancee, who was equally committed to helping out. You don't want to get a puppy, then realize the next semester that you're stuck with a schedule where you can't go home for 8+ hours. An older dog can hold it, and most are fine with napping during the part of the day you're not there. Is it doable with a puppy? Sure! But it's a lot harder. Something to think about.

As for breeds... while I agree that many large breeds make as good or better apartment dogs than small breeds, landlords in your area may not agree. Look into what kind of housing is readily available in your budget... and below your budget. Just in case. Some areas make it very hard to find apartments that allow dogs more than 15-20 lbs. In some areas many landlords ban certain breeds and mixes thereof. Some areas you can find housing, but the fees and 'pet rent' piled on top can put you over the top, expenses-wise. Even if you find one place that'll work, try to get a feel for whether you'll have options if you need to move for whatever reason. It's tempting to aim for the best place you can afford, but speaking as someone who did that... don't. Find somewhere that meets your needs, but you can also continue to save money. Super important, especially with a pet! We've got a member here whose Boston/Bulldog pup has racked up several thousand dollars worth of vet bills before he's turned two. You just never know, with dogs.

Just keep in mind. Things change. When we got Sam, I never expected that only a year later everything would be different - my fiancee back in her home country working, me waiting on a visa to live there, having to move back in with my parents because alone, I couldn't afford any housing that would also accept Samwise. I'm extremely lucky to have supportive parents, or I'd be in a lot worse shape. Haven't regretted getting him at all! But for a lot of people, early 20s is a rocky time, so you've got to be prepared to roll with the punches.

Sorry for all the rambling! For the breed question, I like the lab and aussie suggestions. If you do need to go smaller, beagles are great family dogs (can be loud, though), and this forum has really turned me onto rat terriers! Sporty little dogs, but not as stubborn as the 'terrier' usually implies. I'd plug poodles (come in all sizes, great personalities, generally up for anything you can throw at them activity-wise), but they of course do require some more intensive grooming.
 

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My vote is for the English Cocker Spaniel. They're pretty much bro dogs, content to chill when you are but always up for adventure. They're not intimidating which can be a good selling point to a potential landlord. They're also at the upper weight limit for most apartments (35lbs) and while they do require grooming it's not an all day affair.

I'm a young adult who lives in an apartment with a reliably housebroken 5 month old dog and while it takes dedication to have a puppy...don't expect a landlord to be particularly excited about a young puppy moving in. Having a young pup means coming home on my lunch to let her out but not having time to actually chill out and eat, putting her first in almost all aspects of planning out my days and when she was very young...potty trips every two hours no matter the weather. I have a black and tan mutt who looks like a young shepherd mix and not knowing how big she may grow is worrisome since I do have a weight limit. Luckily she doesn't seem like she'll surpass the weight limit. These reasons are why I would look for a breeder rehome or an adult in a foster home...there's no surprises in size or temperament.

I lucked out and thanks to devoting the last four months of all my time to my pup and my roommate stepping up as a co-daddy, she is the essential bro dog. Quiet even when wound up, does not bark at strange noises, alerts to go out and will sleep all day until you push her "on" button and is congenial to all neighbors and their dogs. Definitely worth the $400 pet fee.

One thing I will say is it can be hard to find the work/life balance when you first strike out on your own. It's crazy stressful if you work a full-time job and no matter how mentally and physically exhausted you may become, the dog's needs don't stop just because you're too tired to deal with anything beyond your bed. You also will always have a curfew because the dog can't care for itself and will find other ways to amuse itself while you're gone...in some cases it might cost you your damage deposit!
 

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I love how much thought you're putting into this! Reminds me of how I am with big decisions. Research until I turn blue, haha.

You've gotten a lot of good advice, but there's definitely some things I want to add, as someone who's relatively fresh out of college. DEFINITELY wait until you're in school before you get a dog. Evaluate honestly how much time your academics and social activities take, and how much you'd be willing to sacrifice to make room for a dog in your life. As much as I love Samwise? I wouldn't have done well with a dog in undergrad. I was way more involved in certain activities than I'd ever expected (which was awesome! I'd have hated to miss out on most of it), and classes can certainly kick your behind in ways you can't always predict. Senior year especially. In your case, I'd definitely lean towards getting an older dog. Puppies are tons of work, and I say that when we got ours a little older (12 weeks) and I had my fiancee, who was equally committed to helping out. You don't want to get a puppy, then realize the next semester that you're stuck with a schedule where you can't go home for 8+ hours. An older dog can hold it, and most are fine with napping during the part of the day you're not there. Is it doable with a puppy? Sure! But it's a lot harder. Something to think about.

As for breeds... while I agree that many large breeds make as good or better apartment dogs than small breeds, landlords in your area may not agree. Look into what kind of housing is readily available in your budget... and below your budget. Just in case. Some areas make it very hard to find apartments that allow dogs more than 15-20 lbs. In some areas many landlords ban certain breeds and mixes thereof. Some areas you can find housing, but the fees and 'pet rent' piled on top can put you over the top, expenses-wise. Even if you find one place that'll work, try to get a feel for whether you'll have options if you need to move for whatever reason. It's tempting to aim for the best place you can afford, but speaking as someone who did that... don't. Find somewhere that meets your needs, but you can also continue to save money. Super important, especially with a pet! We've got a member here whose Boston/Bulldog pup has racked up several thousand dollars worth of vet bills before he's turned two. You just never know, with dogs.

Just keep in mind. Things change. When we got Sam, I never expected that only a year later everything would be different - my fiancee back in her home country working, me waiting on a visa to live there, having to move back in with my parents because alone, I couldn't afford any housing that would also accept Samwise. I'm extremely lucky to have supportive parents, or I'd be in a lot worse shape. Haven't regretted getting him at all! But for a lot of people, early 20s is a rocky time, so you've got to be prepared to roll with the punches.

Sorry for all the rambling! For the breed question, I like the lab and aussie suggestions. If you do need to go smaller, beagles are great family dogs (can be loud, though), and this forum has really turned me onto rat terriers! Sporty little dogs, but not as stubborn as the 'terrier' usually implies. I'd plug poodles (come in all sizes, great personalities, generally up for anything you can throw at them activity-wise), but they of course do require some more intensive grooming.
Good point on the size. We vacation a couple times per year and not only are hotels a challenge (on the drive) but rentals are tough to find. We always pay up the butt to take our dogs. I would say under 40 lbs is the way to go if you are going to venture away from home. Love my aussie to death, the beagle in her can make her a slug now, but the beagle was a howling nightmare as a pup, which was probably the aussie in her just wanting to be with us. Terriers can be pretty chilled out dogs.

Sam looks like a redheaded poodle. Cute.
 
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