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Discussion Starter #1
So, after much thought, I'm completely lost of what kind of dog I should be getting. A little about me and the dog I'm looking for.

About me: I'm able to take my dog to work with me, so time alone for the dog will be minimal. I don't mind shedding/grooming. Have a good amount of dog experience. Own a home with a decent size fenced in yard. Able to walk dog for at least 60 minutes a day (not including training time). Dog will go most places with me camping/hiking/restaurants/etc. I'll be doing a lot training wise (most likely for the dogs whole life)

What I want: 50lbs or larger. Trainable (planning on doing everything under the sun with this dog). Has to be dog/people friendly. Big fan of "velcro" dogs. Preferably medium/long fur. I think that's about it...

Oh and to be difficult. I DON'T want a lab, golden, or aussie.
 

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Honestly, when people are pretty flexible on stuff like coat and exercise requirements and when they haven't even narrowed it down to a few breeds, I think their best bet is to keep an eye on rescues and shelters and look for a cool mix. It's a little easier to see personality in dogs in foster homes because they're more at ease than they are in the shelter. You may even end up liking a dog that has one of the breeds on your "no" list mixed in, because sometimes a mix will bring out the qualities you do like and mitigate the qualities (or look) you don't.
 

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I don't know which breed would be best but I totally agree with Crantastic's assessment of getting a rescue.
 

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Standard poodle is good, but they are energetic and find everything a game. I am thinking a non working line Labrador Retriever or Golden Retriever for all you want to do.

I would be careful of rescues. Not because I am against rescues, but every dog and its behavior/health is the sum of it's genetics. It sounds like you want a social dog that is not very reactive (goes everywhere with you and will lie down for a period of time when you get there.. such as out to eat.. (in the US most restaurants do not allow dogs under public health laws). This means a dog with a solid off switch and confidence is essential. The dog must also be non reactive. You will have greater success if you find a breeder that breeds for those traits.

I think your best bet might be a dog that has washed out of Guide Dog school or someone who breeds dogs for guide dog programs. This at least gives you some confidence of genetics (tho nothing is ever guaranteed!).
 

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The OP specifically said they don't want a lab, golden, or aussie.
 

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The OP specifically said they don't want a lab, golden, or aussie.
The problem here is that they want the BEHAVIOR of a Lab or Golden. If you want that behavior, you need to get the breed that delivers that behavior.

I see people get German Shepherds because they like how the dog looks.. and then they have all kinds of issues because what their life style needed was a Golden Retriever.
 

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Except there's quite a few breeds that are NOT labs or goldens that could fit their needs? I agree that both standard poodles and rough collies fit their description quite nicely. Can't say I see why poodles having a sense of humor is a deal breaker from the OP's description - remember that many work quite successfully as service dogs, and are quite competent at most dog sports. There's one locally that visits the library here as a "reading dog" to hang out with kids and encourage reading. She'll even follow along words on a page with her nose.

If giants are an option, I am increasingly fond of Leonbergers, but of course that's a lot of puppy when they're young! Always have had a soft spot for the Swiss Mountain Dog breeds, too, Bernese being the most well-known of the group.

@onelasttime are there particular things you don't like about labs and goldens? That will give us a better idea of whether another retriever breed, for example, may suit your needs. There's lot of flat-coated retrievers around here, for example, and they seem lovely dogs, and the ones I've met seem a bit less... boisterously silly than young labs. Hovawarts come to mind as well, but they're a more serious-tempered breed with strong guarding instincts.
 

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Poodle. Collie. American Eskimo. English Shepherd. . English Setter. Bernese Mountain Dog. St. Bernard. Leonberger, Newfie. Portugese Water Dog, Samoyed, Springer Spaniel, Irish Setter, Irish Water Spaniel, Barbet, German Long Haired Pointer, Chinook -

Seriously, there are a lot of options that aren't 'Lab or Golden'. Even some retrievers - like Curly Coated and Flat Coats.

How biddable, how big, how attached you are to long hair changes that list (I listed nothing with a smooth coat), but there isn't exactly a shortage of easy to train 50+ lb dogs that like people and are safe with other dogs!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Okay! So first off thank you for everyone’s suggestions! I was really looking to see if there wasn’t any breed I hadn’t thought about.

That being said, I’m now looking more into collies, they fit the bill pretty nicely I think! I’ve already looked into a lot of the other breeds mentioned, I would love a leonberger but size would maybe be a bit too much right now.

The reason why I’m not interested in labs/Goldens is because I’ve raised soooo many with the service dog organization I volunteer with. I just need a change if that makes sense. I have nothing against them, I love them and are great dogs, but I just need a different kind of dog.
 

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Just to be different - Pits, Dobermans, Rotties, Greyhounds, boxers, Australian Cattle Dogs, Australian Shepherds. These fit some of the parameters, but not necessarily the coat desired. All have the potential to be trained to be good with other dogs, as well as to chill.
 

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Well Newfies are large furry love bugs (provided you go through a reputable breeder - there are a LOT of bad breeders who aren't breeding for temperament right now). It also seems to surprise people but they're actually pretty decent hiking partners and can definitely walk for quite a while, provided they're worked up to it. And they tend to have GREAT off switches and easily go into couch potato mode.

My other breed, the Eurasier, might also fit! They're smaller than Newfies, but typically in the 60 pound range. Males are usually 50-70, though females can be a little lighter. They are very smart, not nearly as stubborn as other spitz breeds can be, HIGHLY devoted to their families... The only thing is that they tend to not really care about strangers. The breed standard calls for "aloof" which I know is sometimes code for "stranger aggressive/fearful" but it really just is aloof with a Eurasier. They're just not particularly interested in strangers, though they'll check them out. Of course, there are always exceptions, of course, my pup Beckett loves EVERYone. Also, since it's a rare breed, there is a waiting list for a pup.
 

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Well Newfies are large furry love bugs (provided you go through a reputable breeder - there are a LOT of bad breeders who aren't breeding for temperament right now). It also seems to surprise people but they're actually pretty decent hiking partners and can definitely walk for quite a while, provided they're worked up to it. And they tend to have GREAT off switches and easily go into couch potato mode.

My other breed, the Eurasier, might also fit! They're smaller than Newfies, but typically in the 60 pound range. Males are usually 50-70, though females can be a little lighter. They are very smart, not nearly as stubborn as other spitz breeds can be, HIGHLY devoted to their families... The only thing is that they tend to not really care about strangers. The breed standard calls for "aloof" which I know is sometimes code for "stranger aggressive/fearful" but it really just is aloof with a Eurasier. They're just not particularly interested in strangers, though they'll check them out. Of course, there are always exceptions, of course, my pup Beckett loves EVERYone. Also, since it's a rare breed, there is a waiting list for a pup.
You know, it's been a year since we got our puppy and I still haven't managed to hear back from any of the reputable Newfie breeders within 10 hours from us. The only ones that got back to me are the ones that don't do health testing.. I could have had one in 2 months (and a Bernese Mountain Dog too) but I wasn't gambling that... so I've pretty much given up on getting one at this point.

That's why I don't get attached to the idea of a specific breed - it's just impossible in my experience to get a well bred puppy. So I get rescues... never exactly got what I wanted so far, but I suppose it's the same gamble with backyard breeder puppies anyway (and it doesn't cost me $2000).

Sorry for derailing the thread, but I really don't know how people manage to get a dog from the breed they're looking for so easily.
 

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Sorry for derailing the thread, but I really don't know how people manage to get a dog from the breed they're looking for so easily.
Truthfully, it is often much like 'entry level job requires experience' cycles. How do you get experience if you have no experience!?!?!

Once you're 'in' the dog world in some regard - competing in sports, showing, have found *a* breeder to develop a relationship whether you get a dog or not - people will often all but fling dogs at you.

But it can be really, really, hard to get in to start with.
 

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You know, it's been a year since we got our puppy and I still haven't managed to hear back from any of the reputable Newfie breeders within 10 hours from us. The only ones that got back to me are the ones that don't do health testing.. I could have had one in 2 months (and a Bernese Mountain Dog too) but I wasn't gambling that... so I've pretty much given up on getting one at this point.

That's why I don't get attached to the idea of a specific breed - it's just impossible in my experience to get a well bred puppy. So I get rescues... never exactly got what I wanted so far, but I suppose it's the same gamble with backyard breeder puppies anyway (and it doesn't cost me $2000).

Sorry for derailing the thread, but I really don't know how people manage to get a dog from the breed they're looking for so easily.
To be honest, I guess I was kind of lucky with the News because I knew someone who knew someone and a friend of mine had already got a dog from the breeder we went to. So we weren't really even looking at different breeders, just the one. And we had references. Also, I'm not really IN Newfoundlands, apart from owning one, so I don't really know how good their referral network is or how responsive breeders typically are.

HOWEVER, I will say that I am very involved with the Eurasier process. Since it's a smaller breed with a very active club leadership AND breeders go to the club leadership with potential matings, it's actually pretty easy to contact the club and get on a list to be notified of any litters that are happening. It's also more centralized, so you can contact our club representative and get on the list and ask questions and find out about upcoming litters around the country and stuff instead of going around and around to breeders and possibly not getting a response. If that makes sense. I imagine the larger breed clubs have similar setups, but I think with a smaller club it's easier to keep track of ALL litters. But it also means there aren't a whole bunch of litters happening since it IS a rare breed and there aren't a ton of breeders.
 

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I think you have some good suggestions already. I like the Collie and Flat Coat suggestions!

You know, it's been a year since we got our puppy and I still haven't managed to hear back from any of the reputable Newfie breeders within 10 hours from us. The only ones that got back to me are the ones that don't do health testing.. I could have had one in 2 months (and a Bernese Mountain Dog too) but I wasn't gambling that... so I've pretty much given up on getting one at this point.

That's why I don't get attached to the idea of a specific breed - it's just impossible in my experience to get a well bred puppy. So I get rescues... never exactly got what I wanted so far, but I suppose it's the same gamble with backyard breeder puppies anyway (and it doesn't cost me $2000).

Sorry for derailing the thread, but I really don't know how people manage to get a dog from the breed they're looking for so easily.
I'm curious where you are that it's so hard. I mean.. I know average pet owners with very little experience who were still able to buy a dog from really good breeders (on limited, spay/neuter contracts). Yes, even a Newfie! So maybe it's just where you are located? Did you introduce yourself/what you were looking for and not ask about price in your first contact to them? Sorry you had bad experiences. It definitely can be difficult in some breeds, too.

I admittedly had to contact about 4 Aussie breeders before getting one that talked to me right away but had no trouble getting a puppy within just a couple months. This is from breeders who show/health test too.
 

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I think you have some good suggestions already. I like the Collie and Flat Coat suggestions!



I'm curious where you are that it's so hard. I mean.. I know average pet owners with very little experience who were still able to buy a dog from really good breeders (on limited, spay/neuter contracts). Yes, even a Newfie! So maybe it's just where you are located? Did you introduce yourself/what you were looking for and not ask about price in your first contact to them? Sorry you had bad experiences. It definitely can be difficult in some breeds, too.

I admittedly had to contact about 4 Aussie breeders before getting one that talked to me right away but had no trouble getting a puppy within just a couple months. This is from breeders who show/health test too.
NJ. Contacted the breed club and got put on a list and contacted every single breeder (didn't even mention price, just said why I wanted a newfie) and never heard back from anyone.
 
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