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A little about me:
I am a college student. I live in a small house with a tiny backyard. My roommate does not mind if I have a dog, I already talked to her about it. I only go to school two days a week and I work from out of home, so I have plenty of time to spend with my future dog.

What I would like in a dog:
I would absolutely love if the dog was non-shedding/low shedding because I hate finding hair stuck to my clothes. I would like a dog that would possibly protect me if it needed to, because I go jogging by myself. I would like a dog that is a "velcro" dog. I want it to follow me and obey me. And above all, listen and come when I call her/him.

I was thinking maybe a standard poodle?
Also I would love to adopt a shelter dog, but how do I pick one? I am afraid that I will adopt an older dog and it having bad habits, thats why I would rather get a puppy.
 

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I think you should talk to a poodle rescue. A standard poodle does sound like a reasonable choice; you should be prepared to spend the time and money on grooming though. The "listen and come" part is 90% training and the "obey" part is 99% training.

Don't expect a dog to protect you, your job is to protect it. That said, nothing wrong with letting the dog be a deterrent. I'll fully admit that when I was walking my large hound and my pit bull foster at dark last night, it did add that "little extra measure of safety" feeling. A standard poodle is a large dog but doesn't make most people think "uh oh, better avoid them", although I think clipping it like a hunting poodle rather than a show poodle would change that some.

As far as adopting and getting bad habits... well, yes, sometimes you get an unknown dog from a shelter and you get what you get- good or bad. But you can look into dogs that have been in foster care, either with a breed rescue or a shelter, and talk to the foster family and spend some time with the dog before deciding. Many will actually come quite well trained from foster homes since the foster family wants to have a good dog to live with themselves AND increase the chances of a successful adoption.

Also, consider your potential living situations after college. Yard/no yard; apartment or house etc. And if you consider larger dogs, remember that many rentals have size and/or breed restrictions.
 

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Shell's post covers everything I think needed to be said :). Training a dog will take a good amount of effort on your part to end up with an obedient dog, and talking to a good poodle rescue should help you find the dog you need.
 
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