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Hi Everyone. Hoping to get some insight on Moose. Three year old I adopted from a nurse who couldn't keep him. Can you tell me what breed or mix you think he is? Initially I thought Rhodesian Ridgeback / Shepherd mix, but I don't know. I'm wondering about Belgian Malinois mix or Black Mouth Cur mix. He's the biggest suck, loves people, and is a little insecure and fairly sensitive. Any thoughts? Thanks!
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Welcome to the forum. Unfortunately, the pictures are so small, I can see anything other than that he's fawn with a black mask.
 

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Cat-dog, GSD spayed female and Tornado-dog, JRT mix, neutered male
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Some things about mixed breeds:
1. Outside of "designer dogs", most mixes have at least three breeds in them. Often more.

2. Not every breed in the mix will present itself physically. So while the dog may not look at all like a poodle, he may have poodle in his makeup. Same for temperament and behavior. The smaller the amount of a breed, the less likely you'll "see" it in the dog.

3. When breeds mix, they do weird things. The physical traits from each breed may combine to create something different. A large dog may have small dog dna - he just got his size from a large breed in the mix, or visa versa. A dog may get her body shape from a lab and her legs from a bassett. Or a dog may get her ears from a beagle and her muzzle shape from a pug and her tail from an akita.

With all that, the most accurate way of determining the breeds is to do a dna test. Embark and Wisdom Panel are good. For dogs here in North America, a less expensive test is dnamydog. It doesn't test for breeds that are rare in North America and they don't do health testing, so the cost is lower. They only test for common AKC registered breeds, so they don't test for APBT or Pharoah Hound, etc. They also don't test for "pit bull" as it is not really a breed in itself. They do test for staffordshire, etc. that have been used to create "pit bulls". I've used them on my past three dogs and have been very satisfied with the results. Before getting a dna test kit, check the list of breeds tested for and see if the breeds you suspect are on the list.

With Moose, it will be difficult for someone to ID between the breeds you think just on looks. Because of the above, he may be German shepherd but with a narrower frame making him look malinois, and so on. Really the only way to know for sure is with a dna test.
 

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Cat-dog, GSD spayed female and Tornado-dog, JRT mix, neutered male
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looks like some German Sheppard mix. There are apps that can analyze your photos and make assumptions regarding parentage, it even counts the %
Those apps produce the worst errors in identifying breeds. They only consider looks, not personality.

The problem with this is that a mixed breed may LOOK like a shepherd dobie cross, but in reality be a shepherd, newfie, poodle mix. The apps don't account for the "melding" of physical traits that account for how breeds are developed.

My Tornado-dog LOOKS like a border collie. Same size, same shape, similar coat, black and white. Yet he has no border collie in him at all. His coloring is parsons russell terrier. His size and shape is a reduced "standard" collie (rough or smooth). He also has shih tzu and pekinese that don't show physically. It is very possible that border collies were developed by breeding collies with a smaller breed(s) like this.
 
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