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I for one cannot afford to take Johnnie to classes, only place she gets her training is at home. Is the purpose of going to classes is so the teacher can redirect what you're doing wrong or/and to praise you for doing good job?

I mean, most of the things we already know like (Sit, Stay, Wait, Leave it, Heel, Come) etc
 

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The reason I'm going to sign my puppies up for classes is for the socialization aspect. My older dog is totally skittish and scared of most new people/dogs (initially, until she warms up to them). My puppies are NOT going to have that problem, if I have anything to do with it. So, yes, they can sit, stay, lie down, etc., and I know the extra practice (especially surrounded by distractions) can only be good, but really, I want them to "meet" other dogs and humans to continue their socialization.
 

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Classes provide socialization and the distraction of other dogs while training. Home training is great, when you know what you're doing, because you can proof your training with diverse people, places, and things, and don't have to pay for a class. Most people don't know what they're doing. I certainly didn't when I started! Now that I do know what I'm doing, I still enjoy taking my dogs to classes. They do, too.
 

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Is the purpose of going to classes is so the teacher can redirect what you're doing wrong or/and to praise you for doing good job?
Positive Reinforcement in action! ;)

Classes are good for many things, socialization, you can learn new and possibly better ways to do things, practice in new places. Even if you can't pay for classes you shouldn't only be training at home - the dog likely won't learn to pay attention when you are other places!
 

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Classes give you huge bag of training tools. Many different ways to accomplish/approach the exercises. Even the conversations among the students/instructors about problem behaviors (even if you don't currently have that particular problem) can be very useful.
Talking with Agility or Flyball people can give insights into some of their training techniques that can be used in Obedience or for games at home. Some of our classes are held by veterinarians..their knowledge and dog expertise is very valuable to the students.
While everyone talks about learning how to do sits, downs etc. I think the bigger lessons learned in Obedience are when to correct, how to correct and when not to correct.
 

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I didn't sign Hallie up for classes, if I would've it would've been for the socialization as the others said. If you train at home I would just make sure to incorporate that with training in other places like while on a walk or in a high distraction area.
 

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Do i have to play for class for puppy play time & socialization?
Pay, you mean? I would think if it's a formal training class, then probably yes... but they might have doggie play groups that meet outside of class. It's worth calling and asking if they host or are aware of play groups like that. There are also dog parks, although I won't be taking my pups there until they will come to me even with distractions (right now, if they're rumbling with each other in the yard, they won't come to me no matter how many treats I promise them... I don't think they even notice me calling to them!).
 

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I do all of my advanced training with my dogs at home, but I like to take new puppies to a kindergarten class. It gives me a reason to go out and socialize the dog once a week. Otherwise, I might start using the excuse of, "I'm busy, it is raining, not today." and then I'll never get out to socialize the pup.

It also gives you a kick in the rear to start training your dog. Again, when you don't have that accountability, you might put it off by saying, "Oh, I'm tired, I just got off of a ten hour shift at work and just want to sleep, I have errands to do, I'm hungry..." and the puppy won't get trained. Showing off what you and your pup has learned in class is a very good motivation to teach the dog to sit, so when you are in front of your peers the dog won't look at you blankly while everyone else's puppy is sitting on the first command.

And if you are a novice dog owner and/or have never successfully trained a "hard" dog, then puppy classes and future obedience classes are very good for the training aspect.
 

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I really encourage anyone getting a dog to take it to Obedience or Puppy classes. I think the socialization with strange dogs and people is a big plus. It also means that you will continue training your dog when you get home so it will do good at your next class. (I know that works for me) Otherwise it is too easy to keep putting the training off. I can quite easily train my dogs at home as I know what I am doing but it is not the same as being in a class.
 

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The biggest problem I have with classes are when they differ from what you want to do with training. In my area there are NO positive reinforcement let alone clicker training classes. I made the mistake of going "for the socialization" and seriously damaged the relationship I had with Rocky. I'm still working to this day to get his operant level back to what I had.



Do not sacrifice your training methodology for the sake of having a trainers help and socialization. You will regret it in the long run.
 
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