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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Last night, I went to go rescue a 8 month old pitbull puppy that was about to be put to sleep. Unfortunately, I was too late. But, while I was there I saw a dog that caught my eye.










His name is Logan. He is listed as a Lab mix. I just wanted some ideas about what to expect when adopting from a kill shelter. Are they generally healthy? Do they get all of their shots before hand? Do I need to bring him to a Vet right after adoption before he is around my other dog? How do I know if he and my other dog get along?


Thanks guys
 

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The shelter should vaccinate on intake for any strays or dogs without medical records. Rabies, the combo vaccine for parvo and distemper, and the bordetella (kennel cough) vaccine. They should either neuter before adoption or for puppies under 6 months, require it under contract. I think many high volume shelters do not neuter on intake but rather once the dog has an adoption commitment (so you might pay the fee and fill out the paperwork and then wait a couple days for the neuter if he isn't fixed already).

I would suggest setting up a vet appointment within 1-2 days after adoption, many vets offer a low cost "new patient" basic exam for newly adopted shelter dogs so you can ask your regular vet about that. You want to get prescribed heartworm pills (and have a HW test done although the shelter should have done that) and purchase flea/tick meds.

I would say the most common illness for a shelter dog is kennel cough, it is easily spread and like the human flu, the vaccine isn't effective against all strains. Kennel cough is generally easily dealt with although you would want to keep him separate from other dogs for a few weeks. If the dog came into the shelter already vaccinated for parvo and distemper, he was likely protected against any possible exposure when he first got picked up/ came into intake. Some shelters are better than others about quarantines and cleanliness. You should also look him over (and have your vet look him over) for any skin conditions or minor scrapes or cuts (from being a stray) and have a fecal done to test for internal worms.

If your dog is a fully vaccinated adult, I would say to take him to the shelter for an outdoor meet-and-greet.

If you like this dog, and he looks like quite a cute pup, then make your claim on him ASAP and have a hold put on him until you can have your dog meet him.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thank you Shell. My dog now is only 5 months old, fully vaccinated, but not on any heartworm preventative yet (waiting until he is 6 months old for that.) The NYC ACC does't do a very good job of answering the phone. Should I just show up with my dog and ask to meet with Logan?

Also if I'm understanding you correctly, you're basically saying he should just have a heartworm test and fecal test ASAP, but the shots should be OK, right?

Thanks for the help.
 

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The ACC website says "As soon as they arrive, animals are vaccinated against common diseases of concern in the shelter environment and are given a screening medical exam to identify additional health concerns that require further attention and/or treatment." He should come with a medical records sheet listing all the vacs and the dates given.

NYC ACC website says they HW test, your vet will probably accept their recent HW test, some vets prefer to retest themselves depending on how long the dog was in the shelter and if he was on HW preventatives while there etc. I'd go with whatever tests and exam your vet suggests for the new dog, but a fecal is a good idea because a lot of dogs get upset stomachs from change of place and food and you want to be able to know that any digestive issues are due to stress/new food rather than worms.

I would ask a friend to come along and show up with your dog but go inside and meet Logan without your dog first. Have your friend hang out nearby with your dog or at a close by park and call your friend once you have A) met Logan and decided you like him and B) verified with the shelter staff that they approve dog meet and greets and how they handle them. Then your friend can bring your dog to the right area and such and it is much simpler with an extra person around.

Where I adopted my dog, they actually REQUIRED that you bring any family dogs in to meet the potential adoption. The rescue I foster with does dog meet and greets in a local park or public place but all the adoptables are in foster homes rather than a shelter anyway.
 

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at 5 months you still have a baby on yours hands and TONS of training to do. is this a good time to bring in a new dog that will likely need training and one on on time with you as well (just putting the idea out there). Two dogs is more work, especially when they are "new to you" as they need individual time (one on one time) for training and such.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Heard back from a volunteer at the shelter. Here is what she said:

"All of our animals leave the shelter fully vaccinated, bordetella, distemper, rabies, and microchiped. I believe we also do a heartworm test, that may be an extra $15 or $10. They should also leave neutered/spayed by law, unless they are sick."

And in regards to whether or not this is the right time, it may be, or may not be, but I do know I'll be able to provide for it in every way possible, and would never let it go. It may make my life a bit harder having a 5 month old puppy and a newly adopted year old dog at the same time, but I feel like I can provide a good home for another dog. Also, my 5 month old puppy is really pretty dang easy to deal with. he was like that from the get go. He's already 95% house trained and knows the basic sit, stay, commands. Sometimes it seems like he gets a bit bored sitting in my apartment. He would like a buddy to live with I think.
 

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Yeah, wait a month or two. Your pup is right on the cusp of adolescence and another fear period and is about to get much harder to deal with.

I know the desire to save dogs. I struggle with it, too. But I am very glad I didn't run right out and get another dog after I got Kabota and saw how mellow and dog friendly he is. Being able to put all my attention into Kabota allowed him to blossom into a far more confident, active dog than he was and deepened our relationship immensely. I still do plan to get another dog, but I'm glad I waited.

You may be entirely different, but it's something to consider.
 

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Heard back from a volunteer at the shelter. Here is what she said:

"All of our animals leave the shelter fully vaccinated, bordetella, distemper, rabies, and microchiped. I believe we also do a heartworm test, that may be an extra $15 or $10. They should also leave neutered/spayed by law, unless they are sick."

And in regards to whether or not this is the right time, it may be, or may not be, but I do know I'll be able to provide for it in every way possible, and would never let it go. It may make my life a bit harder having a 5 month old puppy and a newly adopted year old dog at the same time, but I feel like I can provide a good home for another dog. Also, my 5 month old puppy is really pretty dang easy to deal with. he was like that from the get go. He's already 95% house trained and knows the basic sit, stay, commands. Sometimes it seems like he gets a bit bored sitting in my apartment. He would like a buddy to live with I think.
Do you live alone? Have you owned 2 dogs before?
I think I missed that your dog was 5 months old; I mean, I read it but it didn't register. You still have the "teenage" period to look forward to and a lot longer to go before your dog's training is truly solid. Dogs can learn bad habits from each other and having another dog around is a major distraction for the young one in terms of being able to focus on a training session or your commands.

If you're thinking of the new dog as a buddy for the first during the day, stop that. For one, many people (myself included) do not leave dogs alone and unsupervised together. I especially wouldn't with a) two young dogs and b) two new-ish to each other dogs. Given enough freedom, at best, they have a blast destroying your house; at worst, they fight violently and you come home to a dead or injured dog or two. At that age, it is pretty unlikely that they will just chill out for the day.

I have a well trained 5 year old dog. When I take in an untrained foster, for the first month my dog manages to forget most of his manners and the second month he remembers half what he knows. With a puppy, I'd expect far more backsliding. You also have to consider the new dog's training needs which could easily be extensive. His exercise needs also- he looks like a lab/pit mix and at 1 year old that is basically a bundle of happy, high-energy destruction. My most recent foster was a fairly typical 17 month old lab/pit mix: he de-stuffed a couch, de-stuffed his dog bed, chewed through a door frame, escaped under a chain link fence while I was standing there! and tried continually to jump over said chain link fence.

Expect to have to do everything 3 times-- train each dog separately and then together, walk each separately and then together, feed separately (not together!), provide each with attention etc.
 

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Do you live alone? Have you owned 2 dogs before?
I think I missed that your dog was 5 months old; I mean, I read it but it didn't register. You still have the "teenage" period to look forward to and a lot longer to go before your dog's training is truly solid. Dogs can learn bad habits from each other and having another dog around is a major distraction for the young one in terms of being able to focus on a training session or your commands.

If you're thinking of the new dog as a buddy for the first during the day, stop that. For one, many people (myself included) do not leave dogs alone and unsupervised together. I especially wouldn't with a) two young dogs and b) two new-ish to each other dogs. Given enough freedom, at best, they have a blast destroying your house; at worst, they fight violently and you come home to a dead or injured dog or two. At that age, it is pretty unlikely that they will just chill out for the day.

I have a well trained 5 year old dog. When I take in an untrained foster, for the first month my dog manages to forget most of his manners and the second month he remembers half what he knows. With a puppy, I'd expect far more backsliding. You also have to consider the new dog's training needs which could easily be extensive. His exercise needs also- he looks like a lab/pit mix and at 1 year old that is basically a bundle of happy, high-energy destruction. My most recent foster was a fairly typical 17 month old lab/pit mix: he de-stuffed a couch, de-stuffed his dog bed, chewed through a door frame, escaped under a chain link fence while I was standing there! and tried continually to jump over said chain link fence.

Expect to have to do everything 3 times-- train each dog separately and then together, walk each separately and then together, feed separately (not together!), provide each with attention etc.
excellent post. Also completely agree and want to highlight that it is not a great idea to leave two dogs new to each other loose in the house when you are away. It takes months before I know a foster enough to let them loose with Rocky (most never get there) and Rocky is a fail safe dog.

It is great that you want to save a dog. But as someone is rescue I will say this: there will ALWAYS be TONS of dogs needing to be saved. do not feel the need that you have to save this dog (or any dog) NOW, if you are not 100% certain you have the time for two dogs (including a puppy about to hit the teenage stage and a BIG increase in exercise requirements most likely). If you feel your current puppy could use more socialization then look at play dates and doggy daycare or dog walkers a few times a week. If you think that is expensive - it's cheaper than a second dog! When you are 100% ready for another dog, there will be more ready to be saved.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You guys make some really great points. I appreciate the time it took to give me advice and feedback. I kind of was just thinking of getting him a buddy to be with on walks, or when I'm home. When I'm gone, they will be crated. Anyway, I kind of feel attached to "Logan" but maybe it is a better idea to focus completely on the training of my 5 month old pup. BUT, if Logan appears on the "24 hour urgent list" I may have to just go pick him up! Thanks guys
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Also, my puppy really has been an absolute breeze to deal with. So much so, that it is almost a but boring. he does not even enjoy going on walks, but loves going to the dog park and meeting other dogs. So i figured a second dog would make him happier and more active.

What do you guys think?
 

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Wow, these are all great posts. I have found that every comment made is something I have dealt with since bringing home Bridgette as an abandoned pup by the river. We didn't plan on a second dog, but she is a criminal...she stole our hearts and we were too smitten by her. Our lives are richer because of her, and our wallet is much smaller. I wish I had come across this information early on because it would have saved my husband and I a lot of learning pains. Our Lab Mix pup is now one yr (July 9th -Vets estimate of birthday). She is a retrieving fool and requires tons of exercise. The older dog plays with her but only for short bursts, then she is done.

I think if you are truly committed and do everything these pros are telling you, you could be successful. Bridgette has been through a fear stage where everything new to her scared her. On Valentine's Day my hubby brought me flowers, candy, and a big heart shaped helium balloon...well she freaked out at the helium balloon. We had to hide it away in the closet. Later, I took it down low and introduced her to it and she realized it was just plastic and not a monster. I am learning to try to 'anticipate', have a plan, and seek advice. Bridgette is the most loving dog, playful dog, and keen thinking dog I have ever known, and my family has had labs since I can remember. (I am 50 and husband is 55 so energy level is our biggest sacrifice, but it is good for us.)
 

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If you have lots of time and the extra money for a second dog (and WANT a second dog) sure it can work. Heck, many make it work with littermates. But only you know if you can handle it. Two dogs will take more of your time (they need individual outings and straining for the first while) and an increase in cost (for me this is a problem, I don't have the money for two dogs right now, not when it comes to vet bills that are crazy expensive for the basics and for kennels or dog sitting when I have to leave town).

Do not get another dog "for your current dog" to me this is not a legit reason to get another dog (with a few exeptions of dogs with anxiety issues or who "need" another dog - but this is not your situation). Your pup is probably very happy to have all your attention and is happy to get to play with the dogs at the park and come home to just you.

There is also no guarantee that your dog and this particular dog will be "best friends" and play. Many dogs co-exists very nicely but do not play together. There may also be times when they have scuffles.

You can take some more challenging classes if things are "too boring" ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I WANT another dog, I am just concerned now about how it will affect my 5 month old's training and development. Would it really be that detrimental?
 

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I WANT another dog, I am just concerned now about how it will affect my 5 month old's training and development. Would it really be that detrimental?
It depends on how much time you can spare AND how much training the other (new) dog has for the most part. It would help if you have the time and finances to do an organized training class with the younger one (and separate class with the older one if needed) and to spend time daily proofing/reinforcing the training learned in class.
One big thing is that if you get a dog with an unknown amount of training and unknown temperament (you can get some idea but dogs don't always show their true colors in a shelter situation, kennelling is stressful) then you could find yourself with basically two "teenage" dogs.

It really can go either way or somewhere in between: you could take in a mild mannered, trained dog and find him almost no extra effort to deal with; you could take in an "average" dog and need to devote time to working with both but not to the point of insanity; you could take in a high energy dog that needs basic training and your dog could turn into demon puppy around him and you find yourself spending every waking minute trying to exercise, train and keep the dogs from destroying your house.

But you don't get a "test run" if you adopt a dog from a shelter. You have to commit to him.
One possibility is contacting a local rescue and describing your needs and see if they have a dog that fits and could be a foster-to-adopt situation with a few weeks trial period.
 

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It depends on how much time you can spare AND how much training the other (new) dog has for the most part. It would help if you have the time and finances to do an organized training class with the younger one (and separate class with the older one if needed) and to spend time daily proofing/reinforcing the training learned in class.
One big thing is that if you get a dog with an unknown amount of training and unknown temperament (you can get some idea but dogs don't always show their true colors in a shelter situation, kennelling is stressful) then you could find yourself with basically two "teenage" dogs.

It really can go either way or somewhere in between: you could take in a mild mannered, trained dog and find him almost no extra effort to deal with; you could take in an "average" dog and need to devote time to working with both but not to the point of insanity; you could take in a high energy dog that needs basic training and your dog could turn into demon puppy around him and you find yourself spending every waking minute trying to exercise, train and keep the dogs from destroying your house.

But you don't get a "test run" if you adopt a dog from a shelter. You have to commit to him.
One possibility is contacting a local rescue and describing your needs and see if they have a dog that fits and could be a foster-to-adopt situation with a few weeks trial period.
Excellent post and worded much better than I could have :)

It can work, it depends on how much time and ressources YOU have. don't expect it to be easy, expect a huge amount of added time investimetn to train them both. Expect to double your costs at least. Your pup may yet become a MAJOR handful which is why people are recommending to wait until he's 1 and you have a better idea.

Bottom line - YOU need to want another dog for YOURSELF. there is no guarante the two dogs will play and entertain each other, many of us have dogs that happily coexist but do not play at all. And they may only get along in time, it may be iffy at first (i.e. they may not like each other).
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I got some new pictures of Logan, maybe you guys could tell me if you see lab at all? I'm starting to think more Pitbull. Anyway, I am still deciding whether or not to get him. If i do, it will be this week sometime. I can definitely give him the time required to train correctly.





 

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Only one photo is showing up, double check your links

I could see some pit bull type, but there's something else too. He looks small for a Lab, the card says 51 lbs so likely he is mixed with something.

Unless you live someplace that has breed restrictions, I wouldn't worry too much about the breed. Labs and pits are kind of similar IMO in terms of energy level, friendliness to people, eagerness to train and such.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
OK well, after much thought, I have decided to get the 2nd dog. It is down to 4 dogs, 1 of which is the black lab mix Logan, and the other 3 are pitbull mixes. I made sure all of the pitbulls have great ratings and are known to get along with other dogs very well. Here is some info about them, and if anybody could shed some light on what they think, that would be appreciated. I really value your opinions.

I also have a question about gender. My dog that I already have is a neutered male. BUT, he already is very close with my girlfriend's female dog. They actually were found and rescued together on the side of the road, so they are quite close, although they do not live together. Does this mean I should get a male, or a female? I am afraid getting the female (Lady) would make my girlfriend's dog uncomfortable and/or jealous.


3 pitbulls


1. Lance - 38 lbs - Pitbull Mix - 10 months old


A volunteer writes: In reviewing my photos of Lance I had a hard time selecting which to use as in every photo he is smiling and has a gleam in his eye. What an awesome pup Lance is! So awesome, in fact, that not only did he ace his behavior assessment, he is being used as the helper dog to assess other dogs. For a 9 mos old pup this is pretty impressive stuff!! Lance is gorgeous, wearing a sleek gray shiny coat. He makes wonderful eye contact, joy at being your friend shining through. As soon as we exited the building he "went" indicating he is likely housetrained. After taking care of business Lance went into the 'play position' with me and I knew we would have a great time together. Lance is puppy playful, totally appropriate, not hyper, just the right amount of energy that a pup should have. He loves people, happy to meet all that wanted to meet him - and there were plenty- and likes other dogs as well. He posed for his photos like a pro, not minding being tethered to the fence, and giving me big smiles all the while. Lance is looking for a new mommy and/or daddy and will fit into any living situation. Like all dogs he needs exercise, love and a good lap to snuggle into. Come meet Lance today.


https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?...83823219.39456.152876678058553&type=3&theater

Additional pics:

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?...0467.114406.152876678058553&type=3&permPage=1

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?...0467.114406.152876678058553&type=3&permPage=1

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?...0467.114406.152876678058553&type=3&permPage=1


2. Jessie - 38 lbs - Pitbull mix - 1 year 6 months old


A volunteer writes: Jessie is a sweet pint-size pup who joined us with his sister Maxien (A0938782) as a stray. Jessie is a shy little boy who seems to be slightly afraid of sudden movements and may not have been provided proper nutrition in his prior home. Despite that, Jessie is friendly to all that he meets. With his easy leash manners and quiet affectionate nature, Jessie is the perfect companion for a stroll through the park on a beautiful summer afternoon. He seems to like other dogs, making play bows to those we meet. But he seems to like people even more as he stays with me on the bench, content to watch other dogs walk by. After a few minutes, he offers gentle little nuzzles which tug at my heart; he also gives sweet little hugs, especially after treats! He appears to be housetrained, "going" as soon as we were outside. With his size and easy demeanor, Jessie should make an excellent pet for apartment dwellers. Jessie is such a sweetheart; please don't make him wait too long!


https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?...83823219.39456.152876678058553&type=3&theater

Additional pic: http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...9470467.114406.152876678058553&type=3&theater


3. Lady - 45 lbs - Pitbull mix - 1 year 2 months old - 45 lbs


A volunteer writes: Beautiful Lady was surrendered by her owner due
to landlord issues. She wears a well cared for coat that gleams, her
weight is perfect for her size, and she is focused, intelligent, sweet
and quiet. Her leash manners are good pulling a bit from time to
time but nothing that isn't manageable. She sits on command and takes
treats gently. When it came time to take some pictures she posed
beautifully, being patient with me as I fumbled with my camera. She
stayed focused the entire time, watching me gently. Her former owner
tells us she is housetrained, has lived with other dogs and likes to
play, is friendly to all and knows sit, down, and stay. Lady is a
well mannered little girl, easy to be with, undemanding, and low key.
She is patiently waiting to meet her forever family so please ask for
her today.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?...83823219.39456.152876678058553&type=3&theater

Additional pics: http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...472090839470467.114406.152876678058553&type=1

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...0467.114406.152876678058553&type=1&permPage=1
 

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How does your girlfriend's dog do with other dogs? Other females?
Do you expect to live together within, say, the next year?
Can you bring both your dog and your girlfriend's dog to meet Lady?

Excluding the consideration of your girlfriend's dog, I would say Lady is the best choice. She is old enough to be basically full grown and past the worst of the teenager stage, she appears to have normal amount of training which will make your life much easier and generally (but not always) male and female pairs do the best together.

after that, Jesse, in part because at a year and a half old, his personality is more fully developed and he's a little more mature. His shyness may be due to the surroundings, otherwise he appears to have some basic training that will help you a lot.

Lance sounds like a great dog but also still very much a puppy or teen, you'd really have your hands full with both of them. Also, his personality (including how he gets along with other dogs) could change more once he matures at about 1.5-2 years old.
 
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