Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,405 Posts
Honestly, I'd be more impressed if there wasn't so much collar popping going on. I love the look of your collars, and might buy one, but I'm not wild about the message that video sends. Even though you are a supporting vendor, I hope it's okay to voice an opinion on the training method used in the video you posted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,405 Posts
So Pawzk9 I would appreciate knowing what your training and handeling experience is.
Oh, no problem at all. 32 years of teaching people and dogs. CPDT-KA certified. Mentor trainer for a national dog behavior college. Consultant to several rescues, rescue worker, shelter trainer, regular contributer to a national publication on Dog Obedience. Three times training director of local Obedience club, now have my own facility. Have participated in Obedience (to the OTCH level. multiple national rankings, 2 National Specialty High in Trial) Rally (to the Rally Excellent level) Herding (to the open level) Conformation (to CH) Freestyle, Agility, Tracking, Schutzhund, Therapy dogs, ASCA obedience judge (all levels) currently apprenticing to judge Freestyle. I'm sure there's some stuff I'm leaving out. I also work with a number of problem dogs. My preference would be to teach the dog (through positive reinforcement/a little negative punishment) to give to any pressure on the leash and keep it loose. Also that next to me is the best place to be.
Granted, it doesn't happen in five minutes or less. But I tend not to be a big believer in quick fixes. If you depend on equipment to control your dog, eventually, if you don't also train, the dog will find its way around it. Far better to teach the dog how to be responsible for the behavior you want.
I like martingales (and you have some nice looking ones) as it is harder for a dog to pull out of one than a flat collar. But, I prefer that they be passive management and train the dog in more instructive ways.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,405 Posts
Interesting that you mentioned Schutzhund. If I recall, they either use chain chokers or pinch collars. If you paid attention to the first sentence of the video, I mentioned that the martingale collar is an alternative to the chain choker.

It's OK to agree to disagree. If you put 10 dog trainers in a room and ask a question you will likely get 10 different answers. Everyone has a different method of training. When we market our products at dog shows, I assume that you feel that the handlers and judges that buy our martingale collars are wrong in doing so.

Thanks for bringing the discussion to DogForums. We received a bunch of orders from driving people to our website.

Blessings,

Bill
Well, I'm glad it brought you some business. I was considering buying one before I watched the video and read your replies. Particularly after seeing the replies, I'd hesitate. But that is me. Not my job to be the shopping police. People can buy whatever they want to buy. They look like nice well-made collars and if I just saw them at a vendor's booth (and didn't watch you demonstrate) I might buy 3 or 4. Thing is, the main reason I posted was because I thought the video, and the method it recommends is going to turn off a whole segment of potential customers. I thought the feedback might be helpful. And you could have taken it that way, or you could have decided to get defensive (which you did). With 30 plus years of training, it's pretty much of a no-brainer that I started with traditional yank and thank techniques. There wasn't much out there in the way of other methods back then. And during that time, I did schutzhund. If I wanted to (and had the right dog - current household is senior dogs and one slightly younger dog who is a gimp) I could certainly do schutzhund without using a prong or choke (it's still rare, but has been done)

As far as the whole 30 year thing - I think there are probably people who have been training for under 10 years who are more skilled trainers than I am. Those people who landed squarely in the middle of the positive reinforcement methods didn't have to unlearn some of the habits or lose some of the misconceptions I did. I've evolved a lot in 30 years. I'm not perfect yet, but I am a fair hand at getting results. I still have to question myself when my answers may fall in the realm of coercion sometimes and look for ways to teach the dog what I want instead of simply controlling the dog. On the other hand, a person can repeat the same thing for 30 years, and they then have 30 years worth of experience at practicing methods which are at least 20 years out of date.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top