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Indian food is frequently vegetarian. It's lucky I don't live in a city because I think I'd live on Indian takeout and I'm not sure I can afford that :p.
 

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I do eat meat BUT I also enjoy vegetarian cooking and don't push my vegetarian friends to eat meat. I've gone several months without meat here and there mainly for food quality concerns. I try to seek out restaurants that have a strong vegetarian menu for when groups of us dine out so that everyone has options they are comfortable with. My fave Vietnamese place is known for their pho but I nearly always get a tofu dish because their fried tofu is the perfect texture.

My ideas would be to research "guilty pleasure" vegetarian food so that you have go-to junk food options ahead of time, find local restaurants that will fit the needs of both meat eaters and non-meat eaters, and if you want to consider eating meat on occasion, to find farms with practices that are more humane (to whatever standard you can consider as humane) to avoid the impulse buys of factory meats. Have lots of suitable frozen foods on hand to cook up when the mood strikes rather than ordering out. I find that many meat eaters enjoy vegetarian meals more when those meals are spicy or full flavored, so maybe adding more variety in flavors will help keep things from getting stale.

I think it is a lot easier in cultures with a strong vegetarian food tradition. Part of why I do eat meat is that I travel and dining with locals is such a huge part of experiencing a place and can play a big part in being accepted that it is basically, "when in Rome". In Thailand, I can happily skip meat for a long time. In Mongolia, I would have starved. Even the vegetarian friend I travelled with there ended up eating meat; it would have been a grave insult to the family we stayed with not to accept their hospitality. Of course, their animals were most definitely not factory farmed.
That's a big thing for me is that when you are a guest somewhere ... Weather it be at someone's house or in another country always try to eat what is served to you. It makes me crazy to see people being all rude and turning their noses up at offered food.
 

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That's a big thing for me is that when you are a guest somewhere ... Weather it be at someone's house or in another country always try to eat what is served to you. It makes me crazy to see people being all rude and turning their noses up at offered food.
Your reasoning is a bit simplistic, because it doesn't take into account the fact that very often, vegetarians/vegans have moral reasons for choosing not to eat meat/animal products. Someone who refuses to eat meat in that situation isn't being picky for the sake of being picky, they are following principles and ethics they believe in. It's not the case for all vegans/vegetarians because they all have their own reason(s) not to eat meat, but also keep in mind the fact that there are people who believe all species are on the same level and for whom eating animals is simply unacceptable.
 

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That's a big thing for me is that when you are a guest somewhere ... Weather it be at someone's house or in another country always try to eat what is served to you. It makes me crazy to see people being all rude and turning their noses up at offered food.
When someone invites you as a guest in their home, and they know that you are veg*n, or kosher, or allergic to peanuts, it is the polite thing to do as a host to have food your guest is able to eat! If you don't want to host veg*ns, then don't, but don't say it's rude for them not to eat whatever you made. If you are choosing a career like an anthropologist, then yes, you should be open to eating whatever is offered to you. Under normal circumstances, not only am I under no obligation to eat what is being served to me if it is not vegan, the odds are actually pretty good that eating non-vegan food would make me violently ill. If you think it's rude for me to not subject myself to that, then it's a good thing I'm not invited to your house for dinner.
 

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If the food is not going to make you Ill or if you don't have an allergic reaction to it (those exceptions were implied of course) then there isn't any reason I am allergic to mushrooms but I don't expect someone to make a whole entire meal just to cater to my needs, I just explain why I am picking around them.

I guess I was raised not to "turn your nose up" at perfectly good food that someone likely worked all day to prepare for you unless there was a good reason like allergies or a certain food not agreeing with you. Down here if you do that it is considered rude ... Unless there is a good reason. Like I hate shrimp but will still grin and bear my way through it. Eating something that you aren't fond of for the sake of curtesy isn't going to kill anyone.
 

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When someone invites you as a guest in their home, and they know that you are veg*n, or kosher, or allergic to peanuts, it is the polite thing to do as a host to have food your guest is able to eat! If you don't want to host veg*ns, then don't, but don't say it's rude for them not to eat whatever you made. If you are choosing a career like an anthropologist, then yes, you should be open to eating whatever is offered to you. Under normal circumstances, not only am I under no obligation to eat what is being served to me if it is not vegan, the odds are actually pretty good that eating non-vegan food would make me violently ill. If you think it's rude for me to not subject myself to that, then it's a good thing I'm not invited to your house for dinner.
I'd like to point out that my comments on eating meat in regards to politeness for the host isn't at all in connection with friends hosting dinners etc. If I host a dinner and invite vegan or vegetarian friends, then I will provide a tasty meal for them. If I don't feel like I have the cooking skills or ingredients, then I will pick a suitable restaurant or open it up as a potluck.

But if I'm travelling out in the hinterlands of a less developed country and a generous host kills one of their pigs or sheep for the "honored guests" then it is a very very different situation. I've eaten plenty of stuff that had a chance of making me ill in order to keep the peace so to speak and yes, my vegetarian friends have eaten meat in similar cases. A huge part of my travels is getting to know the locals and at least in the past when time allowed, spending months working in an area where it might be that food was scarce enough for the locals that you ate what you got, period, and for a foreigner to demand something special would not have gone over well.
 

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When someone invites you as a guest in their home, and they know that you are veg*n, or kosher, or allergic to peanuts, it is the polite thing to do as a host to have food your guest is able to eat! If you don't want to host veg*ns, then don't, but don't say it's rude for them not to eat whatever you made. If you are choosing a career like an anthropologist, then yes, you should be open to eating whatever is offered to you. Under normal circumstances, not only am I under no obligation to eat what is being served to me if it is not vegan, the odds are actually pretty good that eating non-vegan food would make me violently ill. If you think it's rude for me to not subject myself to that, then it's a good thing I'm not invited to your house for dinner.
I'd like to point out that my comments on eating meat in regards to politeness for the host isn't at all in connection with friends hosting dinners etc. If I host a dinner and invite vegan or vegetarian friends, then I will provide a tasty meal for them. If I don't feel like I have the cooking skills or ingredients, then I will pick a suitable restaurant or open it up as a potluck.

But if I'm travelling out in the hinterlands of a less developed country and a generous host kills one of their pigs or sheep for the "honored guests" then it is a very very different situation. I've eaten plenty of stuff that had a chance of making me ill in order to keep the peace so to speak and yes, my vegetarian friends have eaten meat in similar cases. A huge part of my travels is getting to know the locals and at least in the past when time allowed, spending months working in an area where it might be that food was scarce enough for the locals that you ate what you got, period, and for a foreigner to demand something special would not have gone over well.
I completely agree with both of you :) There's a huge difference between being invited to share a meal with friends and/or family and being guest in a place where custom dictates s/he eat an animal freshly slaughtered in his/her honor or living in a situation where food was scarce and eating to survive is the norm.

Or, I could just serve my kosher friends bacon cheeseburgers, cause I'm thoughtful like that. :rolleyes:
 

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I completely agree with both of you :) There's a huge difference between being invited to share a meal with friends and/or family and being guest in a place where custom dictates s/he eat an animal freshly slaughtered in his/her honor or living in a situation where food was scarce and eating to survive is the norm.

Or, I could just serve my kosher friends bacon cheeseburgers, cause I'm thoughtful like that. :rolleyes:
I'm not talking about a planned dinner or something like that ... Then I will ask of anyone has any allergies or whatever, but if you visit someone's home "impromptu " as we often do with OH's family, if they offer you something they have made it is considered rude if you don't At least eat a helping of it
 

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....we dont do itcause its the "in thing" to do. we do it cause eating slaughtered animals doesnt sit right with us.
Just as blueduck's comment assumes that vegetarians do it because it's trendy, this comment is equally off the mark. SOME vegetarians care about animal rights, others don't. There's a whole bunch of valid reasons for vegetarian/veganism, only one of which is to prevent the slaughter of animals.

I am neither vegetarian nor vegan, but I eat most of my meals that way. I do it to minimize my ecological footprint, as well as for the health benefits. Eating mostly vegan makes me feel amazing physically and mentally. Nor do I struggle with weight, as so many women do. However, I find it highly inconvenient to go 100% vegan because there are always going to be rare situations where it's not possible for me to maintain that without offending someone, causing inconvenience to someone, or simply being perceived as difficult. I love cooking, and everything that I cook for myself is vegan. I serve tasty vegan food to others, and will happily sing the praises of veganism to anyone who asks. But if my friends want to go out for pizza, I'm not going to say "oh sorry, there's nothing I can eat there".

Here's my favorite vegan blog: http://www.theppk.com/blog/
 

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Haha sorry this keeps getting lost in translation somehow! I clearly stated several times that I don't believe all vegetarians think that at all! I think it is a very minimal percentage that think that way is all.




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Haha sorry this keeps getting lost in translation somehow! I clearly stated several times that I don't believe all vegetarians think that at all! I think it is a very minimal percentage that think that way is all.
Yes, I read your posts, all of them in fact. But that doesn't change what the original post said. Since asuna quoted you, I was quoting him/her.
 

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I guess I was raised not to "turn your nose up" at perfectly good food that someone likely worked all day to prepare for you unless there was a good reason like allergies or a certain food not agreeing with you. Down here if you do that it is considered rude ... Unless there is a good reason. Like I hate shrimp but will still grin and bear my way through it. Eating something that you aren't fond of for the sake of curtesy isn't going to kill anyone.
This is what I mean by societal pressure. . .well, it's bullying, if you get right down to it. It's stronger in some places than others. There is no reason I should eat something that I don't like or have an ethical problem with, as long as I'm polite about it there is no reason for someone to monitor my eating habits. I am an adult, and if I eat only the salad, as long as I'm not going "eww gross, how can anyone eat a dead cow" while other people eat their roast, it's none of their business what I eat. Not babysitting my dietary preferences for the sake of courtesy isn't going to kill anyone either :).
 

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Honestly, I don't think you can eat a healthy vegan or vegetarian diet if you can't cook. Otherwise you're going to be eating a lot of junk food. Maybe stock up on microwavable frozen veggies. If you're not vegan. anything with eggs is really quick. Some peppers and onions with diced tomatoes and a dollop of daisy (lol, couldn't help it.) Really yummy and so quick and healthy. Vegan... I know nothing about. I did the vegetarian thing for 2 years and then gave up. Honestly, I felt like shit and now I'm trying to do the while Paleo thing out and feeling pretty good. I'm just really careful about where my meat comes from and honestly my main priority is a healthy lifestyle. I think that is my main concern with vegan, the only thing I would feel comfortable eating would be veggies. Soy, grains... Those are the things I avoid now. So from an ethical standpoint I get it. From a health standpoint... Not so much. I guess it's like with dogs though, different people do better on different diets.
 

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I'm not talking about a planned dinner or something like that ... Then I will ask of anyone has any allergies or whatever, but if you visit someone's home "impromptu " as we often do with OH's family, if they offer you something they have made it is considered rude if you don't At least eat a helping of it
Then again, I don't think many vegans or vegetarians just show up to someone's place and expect to be served food they can eat... just seems like a very unlikely scenario.
 

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Then again, I don't think many vegans or vegetarians just show up to someone's place and expect to be served food they can eat... just seems like a very unlikely scenario.
Not unless they know them very well I would expect. If a vegan friend was at my house and hungry, I could offer them food but not a full meal. A vegetarian meal would be possible.

I don't think Taquitos meant for this to become a thread on the merits of vegan or vegetarian eating though. Rather, a thread for suggestions on making it easier to eat such a diet in a meat-eating world.

I'm a pretty poor cook, but I agree the slow cooker is often overlooked and might serve very well for the days when you know you are going to come home late and tired. I'm a fan of the quick pan frying. I swear that I could eat fried gyoza for dinner 3 days in a row without complaint, especially if it was with homemade kimchi (I like sesame oil for frying BTW). I don't know if there are Trader Joe's markets in Montreal, but they are great for simple to cook servings of both vegetarian and meat foods.
 

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You know that to grow the vegatables you need for your vegan or vegatarian diet take up land space and they also use diesel tractors and other mechanical machinery to work the land, so it really isn't that much of a reduction in your footprint of you really think about it.

I can understand meat, and eggs but cheese and dairy? No animals are killed to make butter, cheese and milk.

I am sorry to sound so condescending, but I have never understood this line of thinking
 

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You know that to grow the vegatables you need for your vegan or vegatarian diet take up land space and they also use diesel tractors and other mechanical machinery to work the land, so it really isn't that much of a reduction in your footprint of you really think about it.

I can understand meat, and eggs but cheese and dairy? No animals are killed to make butter, cheese and milk.

I am sorry to sound so condescending, but I have never understood this line of thinking
No, you don't need tractors to work the land. Yes, in the US that is the norm, but hand and horse labor can be done just fine for small time farming. Timber logging can be done by mules etc. It is really awesome that my alma mater used mules to log the wood needed for a new dorm IMO.

AFAIK that milk requires an animal to give birth so the question becomes, what happens to the offspring?

I fully admit that I eat meat, but I also understand where other's are coming from in terms of meat and the treatment of animals. Farming anything requires a use of resources. The eco footprint may be large or small and even some vegetables require a large use of resources. Everyone can decide for themselves what they consider to be ethical for their consumption.
 

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You know that to grow the vegatables you need for your vegan or vegatarian diet take up land space and they also use diesel tractors and other mechanical machinery to work the land, so it really isn't that much of a reduction in your footprint of you really think about it.

I can understand meat, and eggs but cheese and dairy? No animals are killed to make butter, cheese and milk.

I am sorry to sound so condescending, but I have never understood this line of thinking
If you'd really like to have a respectful discussion about it, it's probably best to create another thread. I'm happy to explain the rationale behind not eating animal products, but I don't think it's fair to the OP to let it take over her thread. Overall, it does sound really rude and accusatory and I'm not even sure why one would feel like it's necessary to challenge why someone would be vegetarian/vegan, or make assumptions about the reasons why someone would choose this lifestyle. In 20 years I have never understood why it elicits such negative reactions. I leave people eating their steaks in peace and don't make them explain it, I don't see why I'm constantly expected to justify what I'm eating.
 

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Because I have been riticuled for choosing to eat meat by people both on FB and personally why shout that I am killing the planet and supporting animal abuse.

The calves are bottle fed and if they are heifers they are either out into the dairy program, if they are bulls they are either sold to other farms for stud service, or sold to slaughter.

Large vegatable farms use heavy machinery ... There is no other way to farm the land and still turn a profit.

Anyway that is all I will say in this thread, if I have more to say I will make my own,
 
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