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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So I have Shasta on a "limited vaccination" protocol for the most part.

Basically, for us, that means rabies every 3 years (state law) and then distemper and parvo every 3 years.

I want to sign up for this Rally-O class last minute to work on some proofing with distractions and get some last minute feedback from a professional (been training alone). They require bordatella, distemper, parvo, and coronavirus vaccines. The distemper and parvo I am good for (if they follow the AVMA 3 year recommendation). The bordatella I am happy enough to give (going to be at a Rally trial at the end of the month). But I am unsure about the coronavirus. Everywhere I read says that it isn't really needed in an adult dog considering the cases of it are so low. I know that in all liklihood Shasta would be fine but I really don't want to give her unnecessary vaccines, especially as she gets a little older.

Is coronavirus common for training classes? Do you give the vaccine? Should I talk to the trainer? I know it's not just Shasta's risk but the risk I might impose on other dogs, but unless the dogs are under 3 months it seems like it is non-existent...? Especially for a non-life threatening infection (for the most part).

Opinions?

If they say she MUST have it I am tempted to just walk away. This class is more for "fun" for me and her but I don't know if I would feel comfortable giving the vaccine just to have some fun...if that makes sense. Shasta has never had a problem with vaccines, no reactions since I have had her (knock on wood).

I think I may be putting way too much thought in this.



Edit: On second thought, should I even vaccinate for bordatella? Would signing a release of liability if my dog develops kennel cough/coronavirus infection help you think or is it more of an issue of insurance?
 

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good luck with getting out of their mandates. vets wont even see my dog as a patient once a year for a general checkup unless hes vaccinated for bordatella, distemper, parvo......

you definitely arent putting too much thought into this. vaccines are drugs, and we should all be very informed and deliberate about what drugs we allow our pets and kids to receive. if your instincts are telling you that this coronavirus vaccine isnt in your pets best interest, i wouldnt go against it. have you researched the actual vaccine? i know with bordatella, there seems to be a flaw in efficiency [just like there is with the human pertussis vaccine].. i dont want to be forced to give my dog a vaccine i dont believe even works..

but im just insanely health-conscious and maybe put waaaaay too much thought into this stuff. id hold my ground. my dog is a year old and im STILL looking for a vet to accept him as he is [rabies vaccine only].
 

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But I am unsure about the coronavirus. Everywhere I read says that it isn't really needed in an adult dog considering the cases of it are so low. I know that in all liklihood Shasta would be fine but I really don't want to give her unnecessary vaccines, especially as she gets a little older.

Is coronavirus common for training classes? Do you give the vaccine? Should I talk to the trainer? I know it's not just Shasta's risk but the risk I might impose on other dogs, but unless the dogs are under 3 months it seems like it is non-existent...? Especially for a non-life threatening infection (for the most part).

Opinions?

If they say she MUST have it I am tempted to just walk away. This class is more for "fun" for me and her but I don't know if I would feel comfortable giving the vaccine just to have some fun...if that makes sense. Shasta has never had a problem with vaccines, no reactions since I have had her (knock on wood).

I think I may be putting way too much thought in this.



Edit: On second thought, should I even vaccinate for bordatella? Would signing a release of liability if my dog develops kennel cough/coronavirus infection help you think or is it more of an issue of insurance?
Almost all facilties, matches and trials require you to sign a waiver in any case - or incorporate one in their application or entry - so I'm not sure what you are getting at with that.

It's not an "issue of insurance" , and it's really not all that much to do with your dog, so much as all the other dogs.

The training facilities in this area are very, very concerned with kennel cough - bordatella being one of the pathogens that cause coughing around here (coronavirus/CRCoV not so much AFAIK)

The reason for concern is that "kennel cough" is extremely contagious and can run like wildfire though a training facility - or a trial or a match. Of course, a responsible owner will not bring a coughing dog to a training class, trial or match. But the coughing can show up literally in a few hours. A dog that seemed fine in the morning can start coughing in the afternoon. Health considerations of the dog itself aside, if a dog is coughing, it will be excused from a trial or match, and will probably be asked to leave the grounds. Also, it will not be able to train at the facility until the cough clears up.

So the owner is out the fees for all the missed training sessions, the trial or match entry fees for all the missed trials, plus perhaps all the expenses and loss of time of getting to a trial from which the dog was excused. Not to mention the vet expenses to get the dog checked for really serious diseases with similar symptoms (yes, there are some). Finally, there are the problems of getting the dog back on its training and competiton schedule after the infection has cleared.

And to make matters worse, kennel cough is transmissable even before the coughing symptoms show up.

So the bottom line is that most schools have a policy that dogs have to be vacccinated against the most common pathogens. The risk to all the dogs that use the the facility is just too great to let that slide.

It isn't to protect your dog, it's to reduce the risk to the other dogs.

BTW, although bordatella infections are generally synonomous with "kennel cough", another equally common infection around here that causes similar coughing symptoms is parainfluenza. That's actually more dangerous in adult dogs because it can lead to chronic bronchitis if not taken care of. And then there is canine influenza, which is a really bad one (though fortunately not as common)


Edit: I was under the impression that there is no vaccine for CRCoV - maybe I'm wrong about that. I know there is a vaccine for enteric coronavirus - so maybe there is some confusion.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the replies.

Poly, I understand the kennel cough vaccine more than I do the coronavirus vaccine. The bordatella I am more willing to give versus the coronavirus. The coronavirus seems like it isn't that big of a deal for an adult dog without a compromised immune system. Also, it's efficacy is low and from what I understand it's not that common. That is the one I have the most trouble with.

I read somewhere that some people were able to get out of having to give the vaccine by signing some additional waiver. Maybe they were lying, I don't know.

Krystina, thank you for the support! Have you tried a holistic vet? I don't know much about them but people seem to find their methodology correlate with the limited vaccine schedule.
 

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Corona is a useless vaccine IMO. Thank goodness more and more kennels/trainers/etc are dropping the corona vaccine requirement. I won't even give it unless it's required by somewhere, and even then I try to talk them out of it -- usually successfully, so it's worth a try especially if you can get your vet on your side.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you Sassafras. I might try to do that then.
 

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i havent heard of a holistic vet.. thanks for the tip, though. :] and good luck! and let me know if there ARE legal waivers to exempt our dogs from things like that. i know that with humans, there are legal, federal exemptions to get out of vaccines for any public or government-funded school or daycare [exemptions vary by state]. i dont see why there cant be something similar for pets. they are like children, are they not?
 

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My training facility only requires your pet to be UTD on vaccines as recommended by a licensed vet. My vet titers my dogs for distemper and parvo every 3 years, and vaccinates for rabies every 3 years as required by law.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
My training facility only requires your pet to be UTD on vaccines as recommended by a licensed vet. My vet titers my dogs for distemper and parvo every 3 years, and vaccinates for rabies every 3 years as required by law.
That seems reasonable, for sure. Have you found many facilities that accept titers in lieu of vaccinations? I was thinking of doing titers next time I went in versus just re-vaccinating the parvo and distemper.
 
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