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I just got a new puppy - an akita. Her name is Saki. Shes a beautiful dog and very loving. Shes only 10 weeks old, and already showing a lot of personality.

There is one big problem we are battling. I know she is teething - but she beats way to often, and hard. I also know I'm not supposed to scold her or say no (dog training books say to eliminate the word "no" from your vocabulary), but its very difficult not too.

The worst is that when you go to pick her up, she growls at you. It seems to be getting more aggressive. I don't know how to teach her to stop growling.

I assume she growls because she wants to play (its usually whens shes really energetic that she growls), and doesn't want to be put back in her closed off area in the utility room. Whatever it is. I don't want her to become an aggressive mean dog, but I don't want to be a jerk.

How can I communicate to her that I want her to stop, without hitting her or yelling at her when she growls (trading aggression with aggression).
 

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Why never say no to a dog? I really disagree with those types of training tips. It will teach them that anything goes, not something you want-especially with an Akita. All dogs need direction, and if you don't give it to them, how should they know whats right and whats wrong? Whenever your dog starts growling, leave the room immediatley and don't give her attention until it has been a while since she's stopped (5-7 seconds), and then you can play with her to show her she gets attention when she's quiet. I really love akitas, they're one of my favorite breeds, but they can be hard to train,and definitley need a lot of direction.

Good Luck!:)
 

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Why never say no to a dog? I really disagree with those types of training tips. It will teach them that anything goes, not something you want-especially with an Akita.
The statement is not meant to be taken at face value. The statement certainly does NOT exclude discipline being required of the trainer either. It's a small part in a methodology that does not favor meddlesome short term payoff for a much higher long term payoff. That's called wisdom.
 

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So then why is the one word you absolutley cannot use have to be "No?" It really makes no sense. It really doesn't matter what word you use, as long as you say it in a correcting sort of voice (short and sharp).
 

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I certainly don't agree that one should never say "no" to a pup, but there is a danger that you'll never say anything but "no". A better way to view it is that you need to be proactive vs. reactive. The more you get out in front of a puppy's behavior, the less frequently you'll need to reprimand him.

It's way more work in the short run, but better for everybody in the long run.
 

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So then why is the one word you absolutley cannot use have to be "No?" It really makes no sense. It really doesn't matter what word you use, as long as you say it in a correcting sort of voice (short and sharp).
Because we are imperfect humans who overuse familiar punishment...no being the most common. From the dog's POV, "NO!" is sometimes enforced and sometimes not. This makes the punishment ineffective and worse, it leaves the dog confused. This would be true of any natural verbal punisher you use.
 

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MMm I prefer to say it's part of my commands.. and that is when I say no my dog stops what she is doing.
How can the dog learn what "no" is if it means stop chewing on your shoes, stop peeing on the carpet, stop chasing the cat, stop barking at the mail carrier? A "command" needs to be consistent, no?
 

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Yes it is a consistent command.. that is to stop doing what she is doing but I do wish to know what you are implying here, as you haven't backed up with an example yet.
 

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Because we are imperfect humans who overuse familiar punishment...no being the most common. From the dog's POV, "NO!" is sometimes enforced and sometimes not. This makes the punishment ineffective and worse, it leaves the dog confused. This would be true of any natural verbal punisher you use.
And true for any cue in the world, imo. I mean, if I say sit - and sometimes accept a down, because its "close enough" and sometime hold him to the exact strict perfect obedience trial definition of a sit, he's going to be just as confused. Consistency is the key to any cue, imo, not just a verbal correction. Yet, the consistency is often emphasized for corrections/punishments, but almost an afterthought for reinforcement or "normal" cues. Silly, imo. (not saying you're doing it, but it seems often done)

I also think it depends on just how enforced it is. I know for my dog if I make a verbal correction, he stops what he was doing and backs away. He'll usually sit as well if he's not sure what he was doing - or "forgot" :rolleyes:

I guess, strictly speaking, I've taught him what "no" means (I say "no" just for ease - I don't use the actual word), but the result is the same. I guess to that end, it has become a "cue" with a defined expected action more so than a punishment to end any specific action. Gets complicated after a while. :eek:

It works. Wally responds to it consistently - and that's the measure I use for any cue I use with him - be it verbal, context, or body language :)

How can the dog learn what "no" is if it means stop chewing on your shoes, stop peeing on the carpet, stop chasing the cat, stop barking at the mail carrier? A "command" needs to be consistent, no?
It does - but then wouldn't any command be inconsistent with this kind of criteria?

Recall is one I can easily think of a lot of things that would seem inconsistent based on when you asked for it - but that doesn't stop us from calling it a command/cue :)
 

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To the poster above, nice post some nice thinking behind your strategy.. ant bahviour that is almost what you want should be rewarded but shouldn't be a stopping place.
 

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And true for any cue in the world, imo. I mean, if I say sit - and sometimes accept a down, because its "close enough" and sometime hold him to the exact strict perfect obedience trial definition of a sit, he's going to be just as confused. Consistency is the key to any cue, imo, not just a verbal correction. Yet, the consistency is often emphasized for corrections/punishments, but almost an afterthought for reinforcement or "normal" cues. Silly, imo. (not saying you're doing it, but it seems often done)
"No" is not a cue; it is not conditioned to instruct the dog what behavior is desired. No is a punisher meant to reduce the frequency of a target behavior in the future. Cues and punishers are not the same.

I guess, strictly speaking, I've taught him what "no" means (I say "no" just for ease - I don't use the actual word), but the result is the same. I guess to that end, it has become a "cue" with a defined expected action more so than a punishment to end any specific action. Gets complicated after a while. :eek:
You're speaking of a no-reward marker (NRM). If you're using it to cease behavior it is a punisher. If you're using it to mark no reward is coming, try something else, it is a NRM. Still not a cue, but also not a punisher.

A cue must be a specific behavior and reinforced consistently for it to be conditioned efficiently. Absent of this you're just confusing your dog, and this adds no benefit to the training process.

It does - but then wouldn't any command be inconsistent with this kind of criteria?
If your criteria is on a blind continuum, perhaps. But a prudent trainer doesn't keep their criteria on a blind continuum. "Sit" means bum on ground, regardless of what training book you read.

Recall is one I can easily think of a lot of things that would seem inconsistent based on when you asked for it - but that doesn't stop us from calling it a command/cue :)
How? "Here" should be one behavior.
 

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Yes it is a consistent command.. that is to stop doing what she is doing but I do wish to know what you are implying here, as you haven't backed up with an example yet.
Again, how is...

Stop BARKING...
Stop PEEING on the carpet...
Stop CHASING the cat...
Stop CHEWING...

consistent?

Isn't your "No" 4 different "commands" in this example? How can the masterful discriminator we call a dog learn one "command" for 4 different behaviors?

WHy haven't you elaborated on this word punisher yet and how you use the word no with your dog?
Are you asking for a definition of punishment? Open any psychology textbook. Try this: http://www.psychology.uiowa.edu/Faculty/Wasserman/Glossary/punishment.html

I don't use "no" in training if I'm conscious that I'm human. I use instruction.
 
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