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Discussion Starter #1
Just yesterday I recieved a Belgian Mali from someone who was unable to take care of the dog. He is about 11 months old and has had 3 owners now including me.
The first owner was a cop who bought him with the purpose of training it (as he is a K-9 trainer). After he realized that his job was stopping him from dedicating
any time to it he decided to take it to a shelter. A few weeks later he was picked up from the same person I got him from. When I went to pick the dog up he told me that
his Boxer constantly aggrivated the Mali and was also a reason why he had to let him go. Dutch (the dog) is very nice and is playful too. He can be somewhat obediant
at times. At the first night home he was left outside. We bought him a large pillow we gave him food (which he is not eating) and plenty of water. While we were asleep he
began to bark and cry at the same time. I then noticed that he stopped and went outside to look to only find out he had escaped from the back yard. He did it twice and my
mother is already beginning to grow impatient. I really want this dog so I need to learn what I can do. What can I do to stop this bad behavior? I understand that he
has had many owners in such a short time and that may be why he is acting so impatient. He also seems very sad and I wish there was something I could do please help.
 

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Unloved dog needs LOVE.

I'm not so sure that can be accomplished by leaving him, alone, outside in the yard during his first night with you.
 

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Unloved dog needs LOVE.

I'm not so sure that can be accomplished by leaving him, alone, outside in the yard during his first night with you.
Brand new dog bounced around 3 times before 11 months of age. There is absolutely no reason he should not run away. Hate to say it but your place may not be the right fit either.

What would make you think that a strange dog would stay in yard, he has not had much of a chance to bond with anybody and if he did with one of his past owners he's got to be a very confused pup now. If you were a 4 or 5 year old child and every 3 months you were moved to new home/people etc, it would be a tough program to start life.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I was with him outside for 4 hours I am trying to bond with it. I will take it to the vet today for a health checkup as well. And probably a walk at the park to get to know him a little more.
 

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Rule #1 dogs run away. Especially if they are unloved dogs that have not learned to form a bond with their owner, and for some dogs even that is not enough to keep them home. That dog needs to feel loved and bond with you, which means you do not bring a new dog home and leave it outside alone with a pillow and bowl of water. That is something you do for teh stray cats that come in the yard. You need to have him tethered to you all day, training, doling our affection, playing, and becoming best buds. If you are in school all day and then putting him outside all night you are not ready for a dog, particularily one that has been bounced around so much and will need extra work to learn attachment.
 

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Welcome to owning a mal. These dogs need tons of exercise, tons of mental stimulation, tons of training, and lots of time. They live for their people. The can have lots of issues, from anxiety, aggression, boredom, destructiveness. They jump, dig, chew out of pens and fences.

This is seriously not a breed for someone not committed to a full time dog. Please do research on the breed, contact an experienced handler/ breeder. Or a breed rescue.
 

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And ... I hate to reduce this to semantics, but ... try to refer to your dog as just that, "my dog", not "it". Him, her, or my puppy works fine too. "It" seems to display a lack of regard towards a living being that most certainly deserves dignity, in most people's opinions anyway, whereas using the terminology my dog or my puppy is simply more respectful. Especially if creating love where no love previously existed is your goal.

Kind of a, *ahem*, petpeeve of mine. lol


OK, I'll step down from the pulpit now. :)
 

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If Dutch is going to be outside, please send him to a Mal rescue. He is in terrible danger if you continue to leave him alone in a yard he escapes from regularly. He could be hit by a car, killed by another dog or animal, kill someone else's dog or cat, eat something poisonous, etc.

You clearly do not have the right setup for a dog right now. If Dutch can't be inside at all times unless you are supervising him outside, preferably on a leash, then he needs to go to someone who will keep him safe.
 

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If you can't have him inside with the family, doing things with him, contact a breed rescue. This is an intense breed and he could end up being dangerous if left alone in the yard. They're rare enough that I think a breed rescue would take him. Don't return him to a kill shelter, though, because intense dogs don't usualy get out of there alive.
 

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I will also add, there is a reason. He was taken to a shelter. If his k9 trainer " didn't have time" its because the dog was not going to work for some reason or another. K9 trainers get paid for on the job dog training. It may ne nerves, may just not have what it takes, but be aware you are getting into a problem dog to begin with. Add that to the normal malinois behavior, and you may be fast in over your head.
 

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At the first night home he was left outside.
This was not a good idea for his first day at home with you. He needs to bond with you and get used to your smell and voice and the way you do things. He can't do that very well if he's outside, can he?
Every time I get a new dog, I stick to them like glue. They are always with me when I first bring them home whether they are inside dogs or outside dogs. If I'm going to do work outside then I will put the dog on a long tether where ever I'm going to be so they can be with me and explore the yard. If I go to town to run errands, they come with me. If I'm sitting inside reading a book, they are with me.

An unloved dog needs love. Spend lots of time with him, take him for walks, throw a ball in the back yard, just sit and pet him and talk to him, whatever; just spend time with him.
It would also be a good idea to get him on a schedule like, walk this time of day, feed this time of day, play in the back yard this time of day, etc. He's been bounced around in homes so much that he needs some sort of stability that he can count on every day. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thank you all for you replies. I really want to bring Dutch inside my home. The only thing stopping me is my mom though. She doesnt want dogs inside. I really love Dutch, I walked him this morning for a couple of hours and we played outside for and slept outside too. lol He knows tricks and is really loving. I will me moving out to college and im bringing him with me so he will be living indoors til then. But i really want him in for these last 2 months. :(
 

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And ... I hate to reduce this to semantics, but ... try to refer to your dog as just that, "my dog", not "it". Him, her, or my puppy works fine too. "It" seems to display a lack of regard towards a living being that most certainly deserves dignity, in most people's opinions anyway, whereas using the terminology my dog or my puppy is simply more respectful. Especially if creating love where no love previously existed is your goal.

Kind of a, *ahem*, petpeeve of mine. lol


OK, I'll step down from the pulpit now. :)
Thank you. o-o
 

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I will also add, there is a reason. He was taken to a shelter. If his k9 trainer " didn't have time" its because the dog was not going to work for some reason or another. K9 trainers get paid for on the job dog training. It may ne nerves, may just not have what it takes, but be aware you are getting into a problem dog to begin with. Add that to the normal malinois behavior, and you may be fast in over your head.
Yes the hairs on back of neck lifted when I read how OP got the dog and the unusual history.
 

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And ... I hate to reduce this to semantics, but ... try to refer to your dog as just that, "my dog", not "it". Him, her, or my puppy works fine too. "It" seems to display a lack of regard towards a living being that most certainly deserves dignity, in most people's opinions anyway, whereas using the terminology my dog or my puppy is simply more respectful. Especially if creating love where no love previously existed is your goal.

Kind of a, *ahem*, petpeeve of mine. lol


OK, I'll step down from the pulpit now. :)
Huh? I re-read the OP and they only refer to the dog as "it" a couple of times, the rest of the time it's "he".

I agree with you though, I don't like people referring to their dogs as "it", but I didn't think anything of the OP, didn't even notice it.
 

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I'm going to be blunt and to the point. Yours is not the right home for this dog. Contact a responsible trainer, one who can keep the dog while they train him and find a home for him when the dog is ready.
 

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I'm going to be blunt and to the point. Yours is not the right home for this dog. Contact a responsible trainer, one who can keep the dog while they train him and find a home for him when the dog is ready.
+1.
OP, I'll be happy to put you in touch with an experienced appropriate home or rescue. Seriously, once college begins, do you think you will have time for several hours of exercise a day?

Malinois are a wonderful breed, one of the smartest, most active there are. Problem is they often out smart their owners, and when bored, can be so much trouble. An older, retired mal may suit you. This is a pup. If you are serious about keeping the dog, get him into training immediately, bring him inside, and do not let him escape. Nothing is worse than an under exercised bored mal, who reaches adulthood and begins his nipping stage. I get more calls about mals who "attacked" or "bit someone" that never would have happened had the dog been in an appropriate home.
 

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The most important moment in your relationship with your dog is the moment you select him or her. All of the rest of the moments follow.

This selection, although motivated by all the right intentions, sounds like a near-certain failure.

I would strongly suggest moving this dog into a committed rescue and selecting a more suited pet or waiting for a more opportune time to get one.

You may be able to overcome the wrong dog at the right time or the right dog at the wrong time, but the wrong dog at the wrong time is an uphill journey.

I applaud your intentions and your willingness to seek help. I really, truly do. But this sounds like a mess.
 

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Huh? I re-read the OP and they only refer to the dog as "it" a couple of times, the rest of the time it's "he".
Yeah, five times in the course of two posts. I only mentioned it, reluctantly, because it was coupled with the fact they were also leaving this dog outside right from the get-go.

Really though, I think diction is the least of the OP's concerns at the moment.
 

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Thank you all for you replies. I really want to bring Dutch inside my home. The only thing stopping me is my mom though. She doesnt want dogs inside. I really love Dutch, I walked him this morning for a couple of hours and we played outside for and slept outside too. lol He knows tricks and is really loving. I will me moving out to college and im bringing him with me so he will be living indoors til then. But i really want him in for these last 2 months. :(
So, you're a college student with no support in raising this dog, likely very little money and you'll be bouncing around between college and home. This will be TERRIBLE for your dog. She needs stability. She needs a dedicated, experienced Mal owner. Mals weren't bred to be lapdogs. Mals are basically bred to be even more intense German Shepherds, and they're hard for inexperienced owners.

She's already got problems, already been bounced around a lot in her short life, you are not the proper owner for her. I'm glad you tried to help, but this isn't a dog you are in any way qualified to help. Please contact a Mal rescue immediately. That's the only way you can help her.
 
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