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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Has anyone heard of such a dog? After spending loads of money looking for a tri-color Bernadoodle our baby boy is growing up (and shedding) and looking more like a tall and awkward hound dog with Bernese Markings, short hair and no curls.
The more research I do the more I learn about genes and incomplete coats the more I feel cheated we were sold something different than what we asked for.

And, the vet confirmed our dog has fur and will be hypoallergenic which is a big deal with one of our children.

Is this common with Bernadoodle breeds to get a unfurnished one?
 

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this is sadly the downfall of designer dogs you have no idea which one of the two parents the dog will take after if in fact the parents were actually pure bred dogs and note, most breeders will not use their purebred dogs to make what is essentially a mongrel.
 

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You bought a mixed breed dog, so there was never any guarantee that you'd get what you "asked for" in the first place.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You bought a mixed breed dog, so there was never any guarantee that you'd get what you "asked for" in the first place.
It wasn't what we asked for, it was what we were told we were getting. We were shown(alleged) previous pictures of pst litters as well.
 

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Berners and Poodles have vastly different coats.

Bernese Mountain Dog standard:
Coat: The coat is thick, moderately long and slightly wavy or straight. It has a bright natural sheen. Extremely curly or extremely dull-looking coats are undesirable. The Bernese Mountain Dog is shown in natural coat and undue trimming is to be discouraged.

Poodle standard:
Coat: (a) Quality - (1) Curly: of naturally harsh texture, dense throughout. (2) Corded: hanging in tight even cords of varying length; longer on mane or body coat, head, and ears; shorter on puffs, bracelets, and pompons

Keeping in mind that even in a purebred dog you will still wind up with dogs who have an incorrect coat, and that most purebred dogs used in designer cross breeding programs are typically not well bred themselves, mixes between two breeds like that can have coats all over the place, and require more extensive grooming than either parent breed.

Also, keep in mind that puppies can undergo several coat changes before they get their adult coat. If they are undergoing a major coat change, then their current coat can look a lot shorter than it will in a few months.

Most designer mix breeders are either uninformed themselves, or will deliberately mislead puppy buyers. There is no such thing as a truly hypoallergenic dog. There are breeds, typically single coated breeds (like Poodles), that do seem to be less likely to trigger allergic reactions, but even that can vary within the breed, with some dogs producing more dander, etc. than another. If your child has been tested, and found to have a very strong reaction to dogs, then there is a good chance that a mixed breed dog isn't a good idea.
 

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^^What LeoRose said. Seems to me that all designer breeders want to include a poodle in the mix, I suspect because I keep hearing how the poodle coat is non-shedding and hypo-allergenic. There are no guarantees with mixed breed dogs. Even good purebred puppies are sold as pet quality because they do not meet the breed standard.

Seriously, we adopted a rescue dog years ago and never knew what breed she was until a pomeranian breeder at a dog show asked us who our dog's breeder was. Our dog looked nothing like the pomeranians that we saw at AKC dog shows. Ours was parti-colored, long flat coat not fluffy, 15 pounds instead of the usual little 5 pounders we were used to seeing. She only came along to dog shows with us to keep our papillons company. The breeder explained that poms were bred out of Siberian breeds and a lot of breeders have had a "throw back" if they have been breeding long enough. But we had her genetically tested and sure enough she was 100% pomeranian.

Life is like a box of chocolates, even in purebreds. There is no standard for a mixed breed dog of uncertain origin. If a tri-colored coat is a coveted quality, that could easily come from a hound breed or a Swiss mountain dog which are all short haired breeds.
 
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