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Im currently a little worried about my new adoptee. As explained in my other posts, he was given to me (well, technically Ive just got him for the week to make sure everything works out) by a friend of the family who was unable to take care of him, and thought he would be better off with a dog person who really wants him. Aka me. Now, things have been going very smoothly. I will most defintaly be keeping him...
But I do have a few questions. He's going to the vet as soon as he can get in, but Im worried in the meantime.

1) He has nasty teeth. They are disgusting. He needs a dental, but those are expensive, so its going to have to wait a little while so I can save up the money. Till then, his teeth need help. When I was little I remember there being doggy toothpaste, but does that sort of thing still exist? Whats the best way to address this problem till I can get the money for a dental? Depending on the next question, this will come sooner or later.

2) his old owner revealed this AFTER we had fallen in love with him: when she first got Trout, about 4 years ago, she tried to surrender him to a shelter, but they refused him because he was heartworm positive. Of course Im going %#@%[email protected](%$*@%*(@$()#@_)_*@!_)$(%!!!!!!, but it was her choice not to treat him for it. Instead, she just hoped that they would go away if she kept up regular de-worming.....
What are the chances that it worked? Im guessing not that good. Or maybe they at least kept the worms at bay? And he's still healthy enough to undergo treatment? Im very worried about this. We all know how expensive it is to treat heartworms... and while money isnt really a problem, there are so many ways we spread out money around, its still a huge chunk of change, and it means that he wont be able to get a dental for a while.
So of course Im worried.
He dosent seem to have any of the symptoms... ugh, if he does... :(
 

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Beki

#1 . Start off by visiting your butcher shop or super market and ask for RAW lamb shoulder bones . They are great for cleaning your dogs teeth . It's a start !
Those raw lamb bones do wonders for my dogs teeth. Start there for the teeth.

#2 . Go to a vet and they can xray your pups heart and determine how much damage , if any has been done . Ask for advice .

I'm sure there will be other helpful advice here coming along soon .

Wish you the best of luck.
 

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You can 'slow kill' heartworms, but it should be done under vet supervision. The slow kill method can take 2 to 3 years to finally kill all the worms, but it also works like regular heartworm preventative during that period. If a dog has only a minor infection, it is a valid option.
 

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Someone just mentionned the ivermectine and doxycycline treatment option (to kill the worms slowly). Some vet schools question the safety of this treatment ( not for the dog but because it can greatly increase the chances of creating antibiotic resistance). Doxycycline is usually given at low doses for an extended period of time and thus this is the perfect recipe for antibiotic resistance.
 

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1) He has nasty teeth. They are disgusting. He needs a dental, but those are expensive, so its going to have to wait a little while so I can save up the money. Till then, his teeth need help. When I was little I remember there being doggy toothpaste, but does that sort of thing still exist? Whats the best way to address this problem till I can get the money for a dental? Depending on the next question, this will come sooner or later.
A prey model raw diet will take care of the teeth problem within weeks.

2) his old owner revealed this AFTER we had fallen in love with him: when she first got Trout, about 4 years ago, she tried to surrender him to a shelter, but they refused him because he was heartworm positive. Of course Im going %#@%[email protected](%$*@%*(@$()#@_)_*@!_)$(%!!!!!!, but it was her choice not to treat him for it. Instead, she just hoped that they would go away if she kept up regular de-worming.....
What are the chances that it worked?
If the dog is still alive after 4 years, it worked. I have never had a dog with heartworms but if I ever do, this is the method I will probably use.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
A prey model raw diet will take care of the teeth problem within weeks.



If the dog is still alive after 4 years, it worked. I have never had a dog with heartworms but if I ever do, this is the method I will probably use.
Raw diet?

Thats what we're hoping. I get the full blood workup back tomorrow, so Ill know for sure then.
 

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A raw diet is fine, but if the dog's teeth are that rotted, it will still need a professional dental cleaning, and possible extractions. No diet is a substitute for a good cleaning when a dog's mouth is already in that bad of shape. Feeding raw bones, if a raw diet is right for your particular dog, will help cut down on future plaque and tarter buildup after the dog gets a dental cleaning.

Fingers crossed that the bloodwork comes back with good results!
 

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Actually, according to the vet, his teeth actually arent that bad. I just used to looking at Charlee's teeth, which are spotless.
He said that while a dental would probably be a good thing, its not a terrible rush. No extractions needed.
 

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There are doggy toothpastes. You can get them at Petco or Petsmart. Probably other places. I brush my dogs' teeth. The three year old's teeth should have less tarter so I try to keep up on it. I got one of those dental picks and fortunately she lets me pick them. It is harder on small dogs. Use to do it on my bigger dog (deceased) and it was easier. Good luck.
 

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No diet is a substitute for a good cleaning when a dog's mouth is already in that bad of shape. Feeding raw bones, if a raw diet is right for your particular dog, will help cut down on future plaque and tarter buildup after the dog gets a dental cleaning.
I have adopted several dogs with terrible teeth and when taken to the vet for their initial checkup was told they needed an immediate cleaning and some possible extractions. Every one of their teeth cleaned up perfectly with a raw diet. No cleaning by a vet,, no brushing, no flossing, no nothing except a proper diet. I even had some loose teeth tighten back up. You are right that a raw diet won't help cavities.

In 15 years, I have never had a dog's teeth cleaned by a vet or had any other work done on them. Only by diet. I have never had a dog whose teeth didn't become clean in a month or two after coming to live with me.

To the OP: I'm pretty confident your dogs heartworm check will be OK. Good luck.
 

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If the owner has been giving him Heartgard (or ivermectin in another form) for 4 years, the heartworms are probably gone by now. Or at least knocked down to the point of not being a problem. Hopefully his test comes back clean!

If his teeth are just scuzzy and not rotted, try giving him a raw beef rib (meat and bone) once or twice a week for a few months (if you don't want to go all raw). That should really help.
 

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Hello,
Just pleas be carefull not to recommend raw bones to all dogs that have bad teeth. Dogs with parodontal disease can easily fracture their teeth and hurt themselves even more while chewing bones. In that case it is always better to have them consult a vet first. If a teeth cleaning only is recommended than they can give raw bones to help clean the teeth, if however tooth resorption and parodontal disease are suspected he should not be receiving bones until after his teeth have been carefully cared for by a vet with a professional cleaning.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
His gums are healthy and pink, not emflamed. There is a lot of buildup on his teeth, but the vet feels that with a good amount of scrubbing, it can likely be removed for the most part.

Just got the results back from the vet- heartworm NEGATIVE!
They said that the rest of him looked good too!
 
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