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Hello! A month ago we adopted a male Australian Shepherd puppy who is now just over 12 weeks old. Yesterday we got a female Golden Retriever puppy who is 12 weeks old (they are less than a week apart). He has been all over her and most of the time it's not normal "puppy fighting" its aggressive and its clear that they are establishing who is more dominant. The problem is that he (Aussie) is not getting it that he needs to move on after they play when she no longer wants to. Once he pins her down he is not letting it go, he will continue to pounce on her until we remove him from the room. He even does so when she is sleeping.

We have tried exhausting him with runs, walks, and trick training but he is relentless. I know this is common for the breed to have endless energy but we need help.

Any advice or suggestions are welcome!! Thank you
 

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Raising two puppies isn't twice the work, it's more like four times the work. Honestly, I'd return one of them to the breeder, and concentrate your efforts on the want you keep.

If you decide to keep both of them, you are going to have to separate them. Each one gets crated separately (different rooms, if possible), each one gets fed separately, each one gets house time separately, and each one gets trained separately. Any interactions are going to have to be short and heavily supervised. You will need to step in and get them apart to prevent things from escalating. There is always the possibility that they will never get along, and you will be living the rest of their lives in a complete crate and rotate situation (which ain't fun... been there, done that twice, don't care to do it again).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Raising two puppies isn't twice the work, it's more like four times the work. Honestly, I'd return one of them to the breeder, and concentrate your efforts on the want you keep.

If you decide to keep both of them, you are going to have to separate them. Each one gets crated separately (different rooms, if possible), each one gets fed separately, each one gets house time separately, and each one gets trained separately. Any interactions are going to have to be short and heavily supervised. You will need to step in and get them apart to prevent things from escalating. There is always the possibility that they will never get along, and you will be living the rest of their lives in a complete crate and rotate situation (which ain't fun... been there, done that twice, don't care to do it again).
Do you think that because of the two breeds themselves or because how close they are in age?
 

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The puppies are too short time with you. Don't rush to conclusions Establish yourself as a leader of the pack.,keep them together and make rules in your pack. Don't be afraid, leadership is the key.
 

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Pack theory between dogs and humans was debunked long ago. Dogs know that we're not dogs. They may look for leadership, but pack theory implies all sorts of ugly dominance practices that will damage your relationship.
 

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Pack theory between dogs and humans.........
Theories...I lern doghandling in the army. Everything army teaching you is effective. The rest was a practical experience. Keeping and fostering mastiffs. Not a poodle/Chihuahua/Maltese/Boston terrier/Miniature Schnauzer/Havanese. Every dog the size of a donkey, the strength of a bulldozer and bone crusher bite force. Big difference. Between Leadership and dominance big difference. Mastiff does not allow 3 y.o. daughter to come close to the pond = dominance, next thing she pooling meat from his mouth, it's ugly dominance and he has no problem with it. Did I teach him to do that? No. The natural behaviour of the pack member. He is the strongest member of the pack, but not a leader. Leadership does not base on domination. When I got lost in the woods he took the lead. Borrowed lidership. The leader makes the pack work in harmony and has access to the resources. Something like this.
 

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Congratulations. You've been here two weeks and you know all about my history with dogs based on my current signature. I'm very impressed.
 

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I am sure your history is interesting, but my post not about it. It's about understanding. pack, leadership dominance harmony. Just an opinion. Don't take it personally.
 

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You are absolutely entitled to your opinion. The polite thing would be for me to agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

Be very careful, though, about even the appearance of disparaging anyone's dog due to size.
 

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I am sure your history is interesting, but my post not about it. It's about understanding. pack, leadership dominance harmony. Just an opinion. Don't take it personally.
I'm going to go out on a limb here & say that (IMO) the army is not the best place to learn modern, scientific learning theory as related to dog training. Your relationship with your loved ones at home (including your dog/s) should not resemble military boot camp. Some light reading on the subject of alpha/dominance for you, in case you're interested in a more modern point of view:
 

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Do you think that because of the two breeds themselves or because how close they are in age?
I couldn't see if this was already answered because it seems like posts are getting off-topic. But I'd say it's because of the ages, not breeds. It's generally not a good idea to raise two puppies close in age together. Plenty of dogs from those breeds get along, and plenty of dogs of the same or "compatible" breeds don't get along when raised as puppies together.
 
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