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I have a 3 month golden shepherd pup. She's sweet and calm for the most part, but around 9 at night she starts to go crazy and charge me and bite even when I say no. It gets to the point where I'm grabbing her by the back of her neck, pinning her down on her side, closing her jaw shut, and yelling NO. But it seems to just make her more crazy and she isn't scared off by it at all. What should I do? I don't want to trigger something thatll make her aggressive later on.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Also I walk her twice a day, go to the park, and have training sessions twice a day. So it shouldn't be excess energy.
 

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I have a 3 month golden shepherd pup. She's sweet and calm for the most part, but around 9 at night she starts to go crazy and charge me and bite even when I say no. It gets to the point where I'm grabbing her by the back of her neck, pinning her down on her side, closing her jaw shut, and yelling NO. But it seems to just make her more crazy and she isn't scared off by it at all. What should I do? I don't want to trigger something thatll make her aggressive later on.
Sometimes puppies, like small children, can get tired and hyper when they are fighting the tired. Pinning her and shouting at her are things which might cause aggression problems. I would simply give her a time out.
 

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Sometimes puppies, like small children, can get tired and hyper when they are fighting the tired. Pinning her and shouting at her are things which might cause aggression problems. I would simply give her a time out.
Is there a particular method in giving he r a time out? Or do I just trap her in one area? :0
 

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I put my pup in time out in the bathroom. It was the easiest room to completely puppy proof. So play with your puppy in the the bathroom, when she gets mouthy, leave and close the door, wait only a couple of minutes and go back in. Play some more, she gets mouthy, leave and close the door again. It will take time and many closing the doors.

As the owner of a 12 week old puppy I learned that when she's really mouthy, she needs something, a potty break, a nap, food, or water. Yelling 'No' isn't going to solve the problem. Your pup doesn't come with 'No' already installed. So redirect your mouthy pup to an appropriate toy instead. I've had my pup since 10 weeks and I have yet to tell her, 'No.'
 

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I put my pup in time out in the bathroom. It was the easiest room to completely puppy proof. So play with your puppy in the the bathroom, when she gets mouthy, leave and close the door, wait only a couple of minutes and go back in. Play some more, she gets mouthy, leave and close the door again. It will take time and many closing the doors.

As the owner of a 12 week old puppy I learned that when she's really mouthy, she needs something, a potty break, a nap, food, or water. Yelling 'No' isn't going to solve the problem. Your pup doesn't come with 'No' already installed. So redirect your mouthy pup to an appropriate toy instead. I've had my pup since 10 weeks and I have yet to tell her, 'No.'
Oh wow! Those are a lot of helpful tips! Thank you for sharing them. I'll be sure to start that right away!
 

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Have you tried squeeling when your puppy nips at you? Puppies don't know their own strength and don't want to hurt you. If you act like a fellow puppy who's being mauled (Squeek, shy away, turn your back to them) They usually get the hint. But trying to verbally control a crazed puppy is beyond our mortal powers.

Cautionary tale of what not to do!
I had a friend with what we dubbed "the satan of puppies" and whenever it went into a frenzy my friend would put it on its back and hold it there until it was calm to mimic a submission pose, but after awhile everytime the dog played if my friend walked up to it it would roll over on its back. It was kind of sad really, how do you play with a dog that wont stand up? Took almost a year to snap him out of it.
 

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Have you tried squeeling when your puppy nips at you? Puppies don't know their own strength and don't want to hurt you. If you act like a fellow puppy who's being mauled (Squeek, shy away, turn your back to them) They usually get the hint. But trying to verbally control a crazed puppy is beyond our mortal powers.

Cautionary tale of what not to do!
I had a friend with what we dubbed "the satan of puppies" and whenever it went into a frenzy my friend would put it on its back and hold it there until it was calm to mimic a submission pose, but after awhile everytime the dog played if my friend walked up to it it would roll over on its back. It was kind of sad really, how do you play with a dog that wont stand up? Took almost a year to snap him out of it.
Yeah, the whole nip thing never worked with her. But I'll be sure to not do that anymore! So thanks for the warning. :D
 

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Never worked with my little Pug either, when I turned my back he'd just start yanking on my hair. Lol


Edit: You have a beautiful dog.
 

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Never worked with my little Pug either, when I turned my back he'd just start yanking on my hair. Lol


Edit: You have a beautiful dog.

Thank you very much :) I think so as well! Haha
 

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Welcome to the Overtired Zoomies. We had this for an hour a night while my pup was younger (8 wks to maybe 4 months?), usually between 8 and 9. I ended up solving the problem by giving him a rawhide chew he was really into as soon as he started going bonkers, and it took him about an hour to work through it, at which time he realized that he was, in fact, tired and went back to being a cuddle-pup. Now he's 6 1/2 months and he just gets annoying because he wants you to lay with him around 8:30 so he can go to sleep. Last night I was doing things so he just followed me around and found a way to be touching me and went to sleep in various odd locations until I finally went and sat on the couch with him.
 

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I LOVED my "zoomie" puppy and grieve that those days are over!

Let them zoom! If you can't, distract them with something fun. Or combine the two and have a cheap stuffed toy that they get when they start zooming. That way their mouth will be carrying the toy and when they tire, they can de-stuff it...

This will pass quickly! Hang in there!
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Welcome to the Overtired Zoomies. We had this for an hour a night while my pup was younger (8 wks to maybe 4 months?), usually between 8 and 9. I ended up solving the problem by giving him a rawhide chew he was really into as soon as he started going bonkers, and it took him about an hour to work through it, at which time he realized that he was, in fact, tired and went back to being a cuddle-pup. Now he's 6 1/2 months and he just gets annoying because he wants you to lay with him around 8:30 so he can go to sleep. Last night I was doing things so he just followed me around and found a way to be touching me and went to sleep in various odd locations until I finally went and sat on the couch with him.
Oh my goodness! That's too cute! I really Misha turns into that as time passes. :)

I LOVED my "zoomie" puppy and grieve that those days are over!

Let them zoom! If you can't, distract them with something fun. Or combine the two and have a cheap stuffed toy that they get when they start zooming. That way their mouth will be carrying the toy and when they tire, they can de-stuff it...

This will pass quickly! Hang in there!
Brilliant idea! I actually have a few toys I can stuff with treats.... why didn't I think of that before? Hahaha! And thank you! I'm trying!
 

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You really want to research clicker training. The methods you describe are old and we've known they don't work and cause problems for a long time now. Using them will result in aggression and a damaged relationship between owner and dog. Please also read Ian Dunbar, Culture Clash, Control Unleashed, just to name a few behaviorists/books that will help you really understand your dog so you don't have to do things that hurt your relationship.
 

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I agree with Pawzk9's explanation. At the end of the day, just before bedtime, my Lab-GSD used to have a final burst of energy. If it was cold outside (in Texas :) ) I'd chase him for 5 - 10 min., otherwise I'd take him for a 15 min. walk for potty and to burn off the energy... about 15 min. before he'd normally get his burst.

@trainingjunkie - My 11 yo dog still gets the zoomies ( a little less crazed, but still a zoom...) after a bath, when it's windy and cool, or when it's below 40 degrees.... He doesn't get the zoomies when it's 105 degrees :)
 
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